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How Long Does It Take For 70 30 Insulin To Work?

Mix 70/30 Flexpen

Mix 70/30 Flexpen

Please scroll down for Important Safety Information and Prescribing Information. NovoLog® Mix 70/30 is a premixed insulin that works in 2 different ways to lower your A1C. It controls blood sugar in between meals for up to 24 hours and treats blood sugar spikes when you eat. NovoLog® Mix 70/30 is available in 10 mL vials, and in FlexPen®, a discreet, prefilled, dial-a-dose insulin pen. For more information, visit www.novologmix70-30.com. Indications and Usage What is NovoLog® Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart injectable suspension) 100 U/mL? NovoLog® Mix 70/30 is a man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes mellitus. It is not known if NovoLog® Mix 70/30 is safe or effective in children. Important Safety Information Do not share your NovoLog®® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Do not take NovoLog® Mix 70/30 if: your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog® Mix 70/30, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar. How should I take NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. NovoLog® Mix 70/30 starts acting fast. If you have type 1 diabetes, inject within 15 minutes before you eat a meal. If you have type 2 diabetes, inject within 15 minutes before or after starting your meal. Do not mix NovoLog® Mix 70/30 with othe Continue reading >>

Insulin For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

The different types of insulin are categorized according to how fast they start to work (onset) and how long they continue to work (duration). The types now available include rapid-, short-, intermediate-, and long-acting insulin. Injectable insulin is packaged in small glass vials (bottles) and cartridges that hold more than one dose and are sealed with rubber lids. The cartridges are used in pen-shaped devices called insulin pens. Insulin usually is given as an injection into the tissues under the skin (subcutaneous). It can also be given through an insulin pump , an insulin pen , or jet injector, a device that sprays the medicine into the skin. Some insulins can be given through a vein (only in a hospital). Research is ongoing to develop not only new forms of insulin but also insulin that can be taken in other ways, such as by mouth. Insulin lets sugar (glucose) in the blood enter cells, where it is used for energy. Without insulin, the blood sugar level rises above what is safe for the body. If the cells don't get sugar to use for energy, they try to use other nutrients in the body. When this happens, acids can build up. Too much acid production (ketoacidosis) can be serious or even life-threatening. Your body uses insulin in different ways. Sometimes you need insulin to work quickly to reduce blood sugar. Your body also needs insulin on a regular basis to keep your blood sugar in a target range. Rapid-acting and short-acting insulins reduce blood sugar levels quickly and then wear off. When you use intermediate- or long-acting insulin with rapid- or short-acting insulins, the longer acting insulin starts taking effect when the shorter acting insulin begins to wear off. For example, the long-acting insulin glargine (Lantus) starts to work within 1 to 2 hours after Continue reading >>

Novolin 70/30 U-100 Insulin Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Novolin 70/30 U-100 Insulin Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Combination isophane/regular insulin is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes . Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke . This man-made insulin product is the same as human insulin . It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It is a mixture of 70% intermediate-acting insulin (isophane) and 30% short-acting insulin (regular). It starts to work as quickly as regular insulin but lasts longer. This insulin product works by helping blood sugar ( glucose ) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This product may be used alone or with other oral diabetes drugs (such as metformin ). Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using combination isophane/regular insulin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Before using, gently roll the vial or cartridge, turning it upside down and back 10 times to mix the medication . Do not shake the container. Check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin . Combination isophane/regular insulin should look evenly cloudy/milky after mixing. Do not use if you see clumps of white material, a "frosty" appearance, or particles stuck to the sides of the vial or cartridge. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid d Continue reading >>

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides For Consumers [internet].

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides For Consumers [internet].

Go to: Fast Facts When people have type 2 diabetes, their body either does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin as well as it should. Many people with type 2 diabetes need to take insulin shots. Premixed insulin combines two kinds of insulin. The first kind helps the body control blood sugar (blood glucose) all through the day. The second kind helps the body control blood sugar at meal times. There are different types of premixed insulin. The different types of premixed insulin work equally well to lower your A1c. The A1c is a blood test that shows your average blood sugar over the past 2 to 3 months. The chance of your blood sugar dropping too low is the same with the different types of premixed insulin. Go to: What Does This Guide Cover? The information in this guide comes from a government-funded review of research about premixed insulin. This guide compares the benefits, side effects, and costs of a newer type of premixed insulin with other kinds of insulin and pills for diabetes. Has your doctor or nurse told you that you need insulin for your type 2 diabetes? There are many kinds of insulin and many different ways to take insulin. This guide can help you learn about them. It can help you talk with your doctor or nurse about whether premixed insulin may be a good choice. Go to: What Is Not Covered in This Guide? This guide does not cover all the possible ways to treat type 2 diabetes. It does not include information on diet and exercise. It does not cover using insulin in pumps or non-insulin shots like exenatide (Byetta®) or pramlintide (Symlin®). It does not cover the use of insulin by children, pregnant women, or people with type 1 diabetes. If your doctor has recommended pills for your type 2 diabetes, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Continue reading >>

Humulin 70/30 Suspension For Injection Drug Information, Side Effects, Faqs

Humulin 70/30 Suspension For Injection Drug Information, Side Effects, Faqs

-an unusual or allergic reaction to insulin, metacresol, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives This medicine is for injection under the skin. Use exactly as directed. It is important to follow the directions given to you by your doctor or health care professional. Your doctor or health care professional will tell you how long to wait after you inject your dose before eating a meal. Most of the time, you should wait about 30 minutes. You will be taught how to use this medicine and how to adjust doses for activities and illness. Do not use more insulin than prescribed. Do not use more or less often than prescribed. Always check the appearance of your insulin before using it. This medicine should be white and cloudy before mixing and uniformly cloudy after mixing. To mix, roll the vial gently 10 times in your hands. Do not use it if it is colored, if it has solid particles in it, or if it does not mix. It is important that you put your used needles and syringes in a special sharps container. Do not put them in a trash can. If you do not have a sharps container, call your pharmacist or healthcare provider to get one. Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for selected conditions, precautions do apply. It is important not to miss a dose. Your health care professional or doctor should discuss a plan for missed doses with you. If you do miss a dose, follow their plan. Do not take double doses. Visit your health care professional or doctor for regular checks on your progress. A test called the HbA1C (A1C) will be monitored. This is a simple blood test. It measures your blood sugar control over the last 2 to 3 months. You will receive this test every 3 to 6 months. Learn how to check your blood sugar. Continue reading >>

Novolin 70/30

Novolin 70/30

Generic Name: insulin isophane and insulin regular (IN su lin EYE soe fane and IN su lin REG ue lar) Brand Name: HumuLIN 70/30, HumuLIN 70/30 KwikPen, NovoLIN 70/30, ReliOn/NovoLIN 70/30 What is Novolin 70/30? Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane is a intermediate-acting insulin. Insulin regular is an short-acting insulin. This combination insulin starts to work within 10 to 20 minutes after injection, peaks in 2 hours, and keeps working for up to 24 hours. Novolin 70/30 is a combination medicine used to improve blood sugar control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Novolin 70/30 may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important Information Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Before taking this medicine You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Novolin 70/30 is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old. To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. Follow your doctor's instructions about using insulin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby. Blood sugar control is very important during pregnancy, and your dose needs may be different during each trimester of pregnancy. Your dose needs may also be different while you are breast-feeding. How should I take Novolin Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

Take A Closer Look At Novolog Mix 70/30

Take A Closer Look At Novolog Mix 70/30

Please scroll down for Important Safety Information and Prescribing Information. Levemiris a long-acting insulin analog that can help control high blood sugar for up to 24 hours in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Levemircan be dosed once or twice daily and is the first and only long-acting insulin analog that has been approved for use in children with type 1 diabetes as young as 2 years of age. Levemiris also the first and only man-made long-acting insulin to receive a Pregnancy Category B classification. Levemiris available in 10 mL vials, and in FlexTouch. LevemirFlexTouchis the only prefilled insulin pen with no push-button extension and is covered by most health insurance plans and Medicare part D plans. Ask your doctor if LevemirFlexTouchis right for you. For more information on LevemirFlexTouchand a money-saving offer, please visit www.levemir.com . Do not share your LevemirFlexTouchwith other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. you have an allergy to Levemiror any of the ingredients in Levemir. Read the Instructions for Useand take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin.Do notchange your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels.Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people.You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. NeverinjectLevemirinto a vein or muscle. What is Levemir (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection)? Levemiris a man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Levemiris not meant for Continue reading >>

Novolin 70-30 Innolet

Novolin 70-30 Innolet

Novolin® 70/30 InnoLet® 70% NPH, Human Insulin Isophane Suspension and 30% Regular, Human Insulin Injection (recombinant DNA origin) is a 3 mL disposable prefilled insulin syringe 100 units/mL (U-100) DESCRIPTION WARNING ANY CHANGE OF INSULIN SHOULD BE MADE CAUTIOUSLY AND ONLY UNDER MEDICAL SUPERVISION. CHANGES IN PURITY, STRENGTH, BRAND (MANUFACTURER), TYPE (REGULAR, NPH, LENTE®, ETC.), SPECIES (BEEF, PORK, BEEF-PORK, HUMAN), AND/OR METHOD OF MANUFACTURE RECOMBINANT DNA VERSUS ANIMAL-SOURCE INSULIN) MAY RESULT IN THE NEED FOR A CHANGE IN DOSAGE. SPECIAL CARE SHOULD BE TAKEN WHEN THE TRANSFER IS FROM A STANDARD BEEF OR MIXED SPECIES INSULIN TO A PURIFIED PORK OR HUMAN INSULIN. IF A DOSAGE ADJUSTMENT IS NEEDED, IT WILL USUALLY BECOME APPARENT EITHER IN THE FIRST FEW DAYS OR OVER A PERIOD OF SEVERAL WEEKS. ANY CHANGE IN TREATMENT SHOULD BE CAREFULLY MONITORED. PLEASE READ THE SECTIONS "INSULIN REACTION AND SHOCK" AND "DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS AND COMA" FOR SYMPTOMS OF HYPOGLYCEMIA (LOW BLOOD GLUCOSE) AND HYPERGLYCEMIA (HIGH BLOOD GLUCOSE). Product Description This package contains Novolin® 70/30 in an InnoLet® disposable prefilled insulin syringe. Novolin 70/30 is a mixture of 70% NPH, Human Insulin Isophane Suspension and 30% Regular, Human Insulin Injection (recombinant DNA origin). The concentration of this product is 100 units of insulin per milliliter. It is a cloudy or milky suspension of human insulin with protamine and zinc. The insulin substance (the cloudy material) settles at the bottom of the insulin reservoir, therefore, the Novolin 70/30 InnoLet (70% nph, human insulin isophane suspension and 30% regular, human insulin injection) must be rotated up and down so that the contents are uniformly mixed before a dose is given. Novolin 70/30 has an intermediate d Continue reading >>

Insulin Isophane Human/insulin Regular Human (otc)

Insulin Isophane Human/insulin Regular Human (otc)

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Suggested guidelines for beginning dose Ketones moderate or less: 0.5 U/kg/day SC Ketones large: 0.7 U/kg/day SC Typically, 50-75% of total daily dose is given as intermediate- or long-acting insulin May use this combination product if the dosage ratio of NPH (isophane) to regular is 2:1 Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Suggested guidelines for beginning dose; adjust according to blood glucose levels Initial dose: 0.5-1 units/kg/day in divided doses Typically, 50-75% of total daily dose is given as intermediate- or long-acting insulin May use this combination product if the dosage ratio of NPH (isophane) to regular is 2:1 Administer within 15 min before a meal or immediately after a meal Store unopened vials/pens refrigerated; do not freeze Opened (in-use) product may be stored at ambient room temperature (below 86°F [30°C]) and away from heat and light Dosage Adjustment Strategies Dosage of human insulin, which is always expressed in USP units, must be based on the results of blood and urine glucose tests and must be carefully individualized to optimal effect Dose adjustments should be based on regular blood glucose testing (See Dosage Adjustment Strategies) Adjust to achieve appropriate glucose control Adjust only one insulin dose at a time Correct hypoglycemia first Correct highest blood sugars next If all blood sugars are high (within 2.75 mmol/L [50 mg/dL]): correct morning fasting blood glucose 1st Many sliding scales exist to determine exact insulin dose based on frequent blood glucose monitoring - Commonly written for q4hr blood glucose test - Sliding scale coverage usually begins after blood glucose >11 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) - If coverage is needed q4hr x 24 hr, then base insulin dose is adjusted first; sliding scale doses may be adjusted upward Continue reading >>

Making Insulin Work

Making Insulin Work

As you all probably experience in your own lives, it often seems like things come in waves. And this past week the wave I have been experiencing has been full of worried emails from people who report that they or a loved one have recently started insulin but that it isn't working. In every case, the insulin is a slow acting insulin, Lantus or Levemir, and there's a good reason why the insulin isn't working. It is because the dose being used is far too low to have an impact on an insulin resistant Type 2. When doctors intially start a person with Type 2 diabetes on a slow acting insulin they start out with a very low dose, usually 10 units. This is prudent. One in ten "Type 2s" is not really a Type 2. Most of these misdiagnosed "type 2s" turn out to be people in the early stages of LADA, Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults, which is a a slow onset form of autoimmune diabetes. People with LADA usually have normal or near normal insulin sensitivity and for them an injection of ten units is a LOT of insulin. One or two percent of people diagnosed as Type 2 turn out to be people like me who have other oddball genetic forms of diabetes that also make them very sensitive to insulin. So starting everyone out at a low dose of insulin makes sense since this way the misdiagnosed people who turn out to have normal insulin sensitivity will avoid hypos caused by too much insulin. But once it is clear that a person really is a Type 2--since they see no response at all to a dose of 10 units of insulin, the doctor is supposed to raise the dose until it gets to the level where it will drop the fasting blood sugars. But many doctors do not explain this to their patients and quite a few raise the dose so slowly that it does seem to the poor patient that insulin won't solve their problems. Continue reading >>

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E Sf A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E Sf A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S

Diabetes Medications: 70/30 Insulin What is insulin, and what does it do? Insulin is a medication used to treat diabetes. It is given by shot (injected). Insulin moves glucose (sugar) out of your blood and into your body’s cells. Taking insulin helps lower your blood sugar level and makes it less likely that your diabetes will cause serious problems. Insulin works best when you follow the rest of your diabetes treatment plan. This means checking your blood sugar regularly, following your meal plan, and exercising every day. What kind of insulin will I use? There are many kinds of insulin. Some kinds work right away and don’t last very long. Others work more slowly, over a longer period of time. Your doctor has chosen a kind of insulin for you called 70/30 insulin. This is a mixture of fast- and slow-working medications. 70/30 insulin helps control blood sugar for about 10 to 16 hours, so you only need to take it twice a day. How do I give myself shots? • First, warm the insulin bottle by holding it in your closed hand for a minute or two. Insulin is easier to mix when it is warm, and the shots will hurt less. • Second, it is very important to mix your insulin well. To do this, roll the bottle between your palms 10 times. Don’t shake the vial — just roll it gently. • When the insulin is mixed, it will look cloudy or milky. Do not use your insulin if it is clear or has little bits of stuff floating in it. • Give yourself the shot right after you mix the insulin. Your doctor or a nurse will show you how to do this. You can also take a handout home to remind yourself. When do I give myself shots? • Many people who use 70/30 insulin give themselves one shot at breakfast time and one shot at dinner time. Your doctor wi Continue reading >>

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

What you need to know If you have to take insulin to treat diabetes, there’s good news: You have choices. There are five types of insulin. They vary by onset (how soon they start to work), peak (how long they take to kick into full effect) and duration (how long they stay in your body). You may have to take more than one type of insulin, and these needs may change over time (and can vary depending on your type of diabetes). Find out more about the insulin types best for you. Rapid-acting insulin What it’s called: Humalog (lispro), NovoLog (aspart), Apidra (glulisine) Rapid-acting insulin is taken just before or after meals, to control spikes in blood sugar. This type is typically used in addition to a longer-acting insulin. It often works in 15 minutes, peaks between 30 and 90 minutes, and lasts 3 to 5 hours. “You can take it a few minutes before eating or as you sit down to eat, and it starts to work very quickly,” says Manisha Chandalia, MD, director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch, in Galveston. Short-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin R, Novolin R Short-acting insulin covers your insulin needs during meals. It is taken about 30 minutes to an hour before a meal to help control blood sugar levels. This type of insulin takes effect in about 30 minutes to one hour, and peaks after two to four hours. Its effects tend to last about five to eight hours. “The biggest advantage of short-acting insulin is that you don't have to take it at each meal. You can take it at breakfast and supper and still have good control because it lasts a little longer,” Dr. Chandalia says. Intermediate-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin N (NPH), Novolin N (NPH) Intermediate-acting insulin can control blood sugar levels for about Continue reading >>

Humulin 70/30

Humulin 70/30

Generic Name: insulin isophane and insulin regular (IN su lin EYE soe fane and IN su lin REG ue lar) Brand Names: HumuLIN 70/30, HumuLIN 70/30 KwikPen, NovoLIN 70/30, ReliOn/NovoLIN 70/30 What is Humulin 70/30? Humulin 70/30 contains a combination of insulin isophane and insulin regular. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane is a intermediate-acting insulin. Insulin regular is an short-acting insulin. This combination insulin starts to work within 10 to 20 minutes after injection, peaks in 2 hours, and keeps working for up to 24 hours. Humulin 70/30 is used to improve blood sugar control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Humulin 70/30 may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important information Do not use Humulin 70/30 if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of Humulin 70/30. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, hunger, sweating, pale skin, irritability, dizziness, feeling shaky, or trouble concentrating. Watch for signs of low blood sugar. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Before taking this medicine You should not use Humulin 70/30 if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humulin 70/30 is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old. To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazo Continue reading >>

What Is Novolin® 70/30?

What Is Novolin® 70/30?

Novolin® 70/30 is a man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes mellitus. Novolin® 70/30 combines short-acting and intermediate-acting insulin. The effects of Novolin® 70/30 start working half an hour after injection. Take Novolin® 70/30 exactly as prescribed. Your health care provider will tell you how much Novolin® 70/30 to take and when to take it. Novolin® 70/30 is also known as human premix insulin. It's not a generic and is administered via vial and syringe. Continue reading >>

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