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How Long Does Humalog Stay In The Body?

Insulin Actions Times And Peak Times

Insulin Actions Times And Peak Times

A good way to improve your glucose levels is to track the peaks and drops in your glucose , so you can figure out why they happened and how to correct them. Once you identify glucose patterns (they ARE there!), you also want to understand when each of your insulins is active and when they typically stop lowering your glucose. This helps you adjust your doses or food intake to stop unwanted ups and downs in your readings. The table below shows the start, peak, and end times for various insulins with some explanations and typical uses for each. When Does My Insulin Peak and How Long Does It Last? designed to peak, covers meals and lowers high BGs Humalog , Novolog and Apidra insulins currently give the best coverage for meals and help keep the glucose lower afterward. Their glucose lowering activity starts to work about 20 minutes after they are taken, with a gradual rise in activity over the next 1.75 to 2.25 hours. Their activity gradually falls over the next 3 hours with about 5 to 6 hours of activity being common with these insulins.Although insulin action times are often quoted as 3-5 hours, the actual duration of insulin action is typically 5 hours or more. See our article Duration of Insulin Action for more information on this important topic. In general, "rapid" insulins are still too slow for many common meals where the glucose peaks within an hour and digestion is complete within 2-3 hours. The best kept secret on stopping post meal spiking is to eake the injection or bolus earlier before the meal and to eat slower low glycemic carbs. Regular insulin still carries its original name of "fast insulin" but its slower action often works better for people who take Symlin or for those who have gastroparesis (delayed digestion). It is also a great choice for those who Continue reading >>

About Fast-acting Mealtime Insulin

About Fast-acting Mealtime Insulin

What is mealtime insulin? Mealtime insulins are fast-acting insulins that are taken immediately before or after meals. As you eat, your blood sugar naturally goes up, or “spikes.” Humalog® (a fast-acting insulin) works to manage those blood sugar spikes and may help keep your sugar levels in balance. Humalog should be taken within 15 minutes before eating or right after eating a meal. People who take Humalog will usually continue to take longer-acting insulin to help manage blood sugar levels at night and between meals. Taking mealtime insulin in addition to longer-acting insulin may help to control blood sugar levels throughout the day. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common side effect of Humalog that may be severe and cause unconsciousness (passing out), seizures, and death. Test your blood sugar levels as your doctor instructs. Talk to your doctor about low blood sugar symptoms and treatment. The orange area shows how blood sugar levels typically rise after meals. The pattern of insulin action may vary in different individuals or within the same individual. Comparing types of insulin Take a look at our overview below to find out about the different types of insulin. You’ll notice that there are differences in when the types of insulin reach your bloodstream, when they “peak” in your body, and how long they can last (length of time the insulin keeps lowering your blood sugar). Fast-acting insulin (also called rapid-acting) is absorbed quickly and starts working in about 15 minutes to lower blood sugar after meals. Humalog fast-acting insulin should be taken 15 minutes before eating or right after eating a meal. Depending on the type of diabetes you have, you may need to take Humalog with a longer-acting insulin or oral anti-diabetes medication. Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin And How They Work

Types Of Insulin And How They Work

Insulin is a hormone the body makes to control the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood. It lowers blood sugar by allowing glucose to leave the bloodstream and enter body cells. Without enough insulin, the level of glucose in the bloodstream can become too high. Everyone needs insulin to use food properly. People without diabetes make enough of their own insulin to keep their blood sugar at healthy levels all the time. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin of their own. Instead, they need to take shots of one or more types of insulin to keep their blood sugars close to normal. Between 75 and 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes need to take insulin shots to help them get the best control of their blood sugar levels. Deciding How Much Insulin to Take The amount of insulin a person needs depends on: Body weight Percentage of body fat Activity level Diet Other medicines Emotions and stress General health Type of insulin When you first start taking insulin shots, your doctor might ask you to change the amount you take or the time you take it several times. You and your doctor will base these changes on the results of your blood sugar tests. You'll need to make adjustments until you find the dose and schedule that work best for you. Each person's need for insulin is different: Some people can control their blood sugar with one shot of insulin a day. Most people need more than three shots every day. Many people need more than one type of insulin. If you take several insulin shots a day or use more than one type of insulin, it doesn't mean your diabetes isn't in good control. Your blood sugar, not the amount or type of insulin you take, is the best way to judge how well you are doing. If you take three shots a day and your blood sugar is near normal, that's Continue reading >>

What Is Humalog Insulin Lispro: Onset Peak Time And Duration?

What Is Humalog Insulin Lispro: Onset Peak Time And Duration?

What is Humalog? Humalog is the brand name of insulin lispro, and is used to control high blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. This medication is a fast acting insulin, which begins to work quickly after injection. Insulin is a natural hormone that is produced by beta cells in the pancreas. This naturally occurring hormone works by helping glucose get into the cells for energy. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter the cells, hence they remain in the bloodstream. Too much glucose in the blood can lead to serious health complications such as blood vessel damage which could lead to life threatening conditions such as stroke. People with diabetes do not produce enough insulin or use it properly. As a result, they experience high blood sugar levels. How does this medication work? It works by replacing the naturally occurring insulin hormone and helping glucose move from the bloodstream to body tissues such as muscle and fat cells. Humalog also prevents the liver from producing more glucose which helps to control high blood sugar levels. Using this medication reduces your risk of developing serious health complications such as nerve damage and heart disease. Insulin lispro is part of a treatment program that consists of exercise program, diet plan and weight loss. It is important you follow your diet, exercise and medication program very closely during your treatment. Changing any of these factors can adversely affect your blood glucose levels. Insulin lispro does not cure diabetes, rather it helps to manage it. Humalog insulin lispro onset, peak time and duration The drug onset refers to the duration it takes before this medication starts to work in the body. On the other hand, humalog peak refers to the period it takes before the maximum effects are felt. The medica Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro Injection

Insulin Lispro Injection

Insulin lispro is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin lispro is always used with another type of insulin, unless it is used in an external insulin pump. In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin lispro may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin lispro is a short-acting, man-made version of human insulin. Insulin lispro works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin lispro comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid Continue reading >>

Humalog Side Effects Center

Humalog Side Effects Center

Humalog (insulin lispro [rDNA origin]) Injection is a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes in adults. Humalog is usually given together with another long-acting insulin. Humalog is also used together with oral medications to treat type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes in adults. Common side effects of Humalog include: injection site reactions (e.g., pain, redness, irritation). Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), is the most common side effect of insulin lispro such as Humalog. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusions, or seizure (convulsions). Low blood potassium levels (hypokalemia). Symptoms include dry mouth, increased thirst, increased urination, uneven heartbeats, muscle pain or weakness, leg pain or discomfort, or confusion The total daily insulin requirement varies and the dose is usually between 0.5 to 1 unit/kg/day. Insulin needs may be altered during stress, major illness, or changes in exercise, meal patterns, or co-administered drugs. Humalog may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, guanethidine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin lispro on lowering blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Humalog. Discuss a plan for managing blood sugars with your doctor before becoming pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin used during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our Humalog (insulin lispro, USP [rDNA origin]) Inj Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: How Long Does It Take For Insulin To Work?

Type 2 Diabetes: How Long Does It Take For Insulin To Work?

If you have been living with type 2 diabetes for a while, then you may be on a medication regimen that includes insulin. You’ve probably noticed that your type 2 diabetes is a bit different from other people’s. Every person’s body is different, and this is just one reason why the response to insulin treatments can vary from person to person. Read on to ease your confusion about insulin and learn how it supports blood sugar management on the individual level. How insulin works in the body Insulin is produced naturally in the body by the pancreas. The pancreas contains millions of beta cells, and these cells are responsible for making insulin. Whenever you eat food with carbohydrates, your beta cells release insulin so that other cells in the body can use the blood glucose it gets from food for energy. In a sense, insulin acts as a key, letting glucose into the cells. How insulin works without diabetes Under normal circumstances, the body produces insulin after digestion. The presence of insulin triggers cells to take in the glucose and use it as energy. The ability of your cells to respond to insulin is called insulin sensitivity. What happens to insulin when you have diabetes? If you have type 2 diabetes, your body either can’t produce any or enough insulin, or is resistant to its presence. That means glucose is not able to get into your body’s cells effectively. The inability for the cells to absorb the glucose in the blood causes elevated blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels will be high after meals, and even between meals, since the liver makes glucose when we are between meals or sleeping. People who have type 2 diabetes often take diabetes pills or insulin shots to improve their blood sugar levels. Characteristics of insulin Insulin exists in suspension Continue reading >>

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

Editor’s comment: The commentary by Dr. Grajower has such important clinical relevance that responses were invited from the three pharmaceutical companies that supply insulin in the U.S. and the American Diabetes Association, and all of these combined in this commentary. The commenting letter and individual responses were authored separately and are completely independent of each other. Diabetic patients treated with insulin, whether for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, are prone to often unexplained swings in their blood glucose. These swings can vary from dangerously low to persistently high levels. Most diabetic patients, and most physicians, will adjust insulin regimens so as to avoid hypoglycemia at the expense of hyperglycemia. Among the “textbook” reasons for variable glucose responses to any given insulin regimen are 1) site of administration, 2) exercise, 3) bottles not adequately mixed before drawing the insulin (for NPH, Lente, or Ultralente), and 4) duration of treatment with insulin (1). A new insulin was marketed by Aventis Pharmaceuticals about 1 year ago, insulin glargine (Lantus). The manufacturer seemed to stress that patients not use a started bottle of this insulin for >28 days (2). Two patients of mine highlighted this point. L.K. is a 76-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, diagnosed at 55 years of age, and treated with insulin since age 56. Her insulin regimen was changed to Lantus at night together with Novolog before meals. She monitors her blood glucose four times a day. She used a bottle of Lantus until it ran out; therefore, a bottle lasted for 2 months. Her recent HbA1c was 7.6%. I retrospectively analyzed her home glucose readings by averaging her fasting blood glucose levels for the first 15 days of a new bottle and the last 15 days of tha Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

What you need to know If you have to take insulin to treat diabetes, there’s good news: You have choices. There are five types of insulin. They vary by onset (how soon they start to work), peak (how long they take to kick into full effect) and duration (how long they stay in your body). You may have to take more than one type of insulin, and these needs may change over time (and can vary depending on your type of diabetes). Find out more about the insulin types best for you. Rapid-acting insulin What it’s called: Humalog (lispro), NovoLog (aspart), Apidra (glulisine) Rapid-acting insulin is taken just before or after meals, to control spikes in blood sugar. This type is typically used in addition to a longer-acting insulin. It often works in 15 minutes, peaks between 30 and 90 minutes, and lasts 3 to 5 hours. “You can take it a few minutes before eating or as you sit down to eat, and it starts to work very quickly,” says Manisha Chandalia, MD, director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch, in Galveston. Short-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin R, Novolin R Short-acting insulin covers your insulin needs during meals. It is taken about 30 minutes to an hour before a meal to help control blood sugar levels. This type of insulin takes effect in about 30 minutes to one hour, and peaks after two to four hours. Its effects tend to last about five to eight hours. “The biggest advantage of short-acting insulin is that you don't have to take it at each meal. You can take it at breakfast and supper and still have good control because it lasts a little longer,” Dr. Chandalia says. Intermediate-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin N (NPH), Novolin N (NPH) Intermediate-acting insulin can control blood sugar levels for about Continue reading >>

Humalog

Humalog

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps the body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. Insulin lispro is a rapid-acting insulin. It takes about 10 to 15 minutes after injection to begin working and has its maximum effect between 45 minutes and 150 minutes. It stops working after 3.5 to 5 hours. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? Humalog® Each 10 mL vial contains 100 units of human insulin analogue (insulin lispr Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog and Novolog are two diabetes medications. Humalog is the brand-name version of insulin lispro, and Novolog is the brand-name version of insulin aspart. These drugs both help control blood glucose (sugar) in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Humalog and Novolog are both rapid acting. That means they work more quickly than other types of insulin. There are important distinctions between Humalog and Novolog, however, and the drugs are not directly interchangeable. Check out this comparison so you can work with your doctor to choose a drug that’s right for you. Insulin is injected under your skin fat. It’s the most common type of treatment for type 1 diabetes because it works quickly. It’s also the only type of diabetes medication that’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Humalog and Novolog are both equivalent to the insulin made in your body. Unlike oral diabetes drugs, insulin provides fast relief for changes in your blood sugar. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes depends on how often and how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day. The table below provides quick facts at a glance. Brand name Humalog Novolog What is the generic drug? insulin lispro insulin aspart Is a generic version available? no no What does it treat? type 1 and type 2 diabetes type 1 and type 2 diabetes What form does it come in? solution for injection solution for injection What strengths does it come in? • 3-mL cartridges • 3-mL prefilled KwikPen • 3-mL vials • 10-mL vials • 3-mL FlexPen • 3-mL FlexTouch • 3-mL PenFill cartridges • 10-mL vials What is the typical length of treatment? long-term long-term How do I store it? Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Continue reading >>

Anyone On Humalog?

Anyone On Humalog?

Member NPH and Humalog and Metformin twice daily... If this is in the wrong forum, I apologize. I have started on Humalog (rapid acting) insulin. I am wondering if anyone has had any experience with it, good or bad? Diabetes is like being expected to play the piano with one hand while juggling items with another hand, all while balancing with deftness and dexterity on a tightrope" - Marlene Less D.D. Family T1 for 72 years, here to help Hello Heidi. I have used Humalog for about 8 years. I has done wonders for me! I was previously using Humulin R for my fast acting insulin and it too long to work and I had highs too much of the time until it did work. Humalog works much faster. Be careful with it. It should start lowering your BGL about 15 minutes after your injection. I assume you count carbs and will use the appropriate amount of Humalog prior to each meal or snack. You need to know your insulin/carb ratios for various times of the day to use Humalog in the most effective manner. Please ask questions about your specific concerns. D.D. Family Kidney/Pancreas transplant recipient I've also been using Humalog for 8 years, and I have found no problems with it .Like Richard said, it gets to work pretty quickly and so is injected immediately before you eat. It's worked well for me..I hope it works for you too! D.D. Family Type 1 since 2002, pumper since 2004 I have been using Humalog since I started on insulin and I have no complaints. Richard makes a good point about it starting to lower your levels about 15 minutes after injection. If you know what you are going to eat and you know that you will finish it, you may want to inject 10-15 minutes before you start eating to help keep your numbers steady. I would not recommend doing that at a restaurant though, as you never kn Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Lispro (humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog Kwikpen, Humalog Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Lispro (humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog Kwikpen, Humalog Pen)?

HUMALOG (insulin lispro) Injection DESCRIPTION HUMALOG® (insulin lispro injection) is a rapid-acting human insulin analog used to lower blood glucose. Insulin lispro is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. Insulin lispro differs from human insulin in that the amino acid proline at position B28 is replaced by lysine and the lysine in position B29 is replaced by proline. Chemically, it is Lys(B28), Pro(B29) human insulin analog and has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 and a molecular weight of 5808, both identical to that of human insulin. HUMALOG has the following primary structure: HUMALOG is a sterile, aqueous, clear, and colorless solution. Each milliliter of HUMALOG U-100 contains insulin lispro 100 units, 16 mg glycerin, 1.88 mg dibasic sodium phosphate, 3.15 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.0197 mg zinc ion, trace amounts of phenol, and Water for Injection. Insulin lispro has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. The pH is adjusted by addition of aqueous solutions of hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10%. Each milliliter of HUMALOG U-200 contains insulin lispro 200 units, 16 mg glycerin, 5 mg tromethamine, 3.15 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.046 mg zinc ion, trace amounts of phenol, and Water for Injection. Insulin lispro has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. The pH is adjusted by addition of aqueous solutions of hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10%. font size A A A 1 2 3 4 5 Next What is Type 2 Diabetes? The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes, formerly called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or "adult onset" diabetes, so-called because it typically develops in adults over age 35, though it can develop at any age. Type 2 diabetes i Continue reading >>

Rapid Insulins | Diabetesnet.com

Rapid Insulins | Diabetesnet.com

Thu, 11/18/2010 - 15:27 -- Richard Morris See also Kinetics vs. Dynamics , Humalog & Heat and Users' Reports Like Regular, Humalog and Novolog are used to cover meals and snacks. Most meals raise the blood sugar for only 2 to 3 hours afterwards. Once injected, Regular insulin takes 30 minutes to begin working, peaks between 2 and 4 hours and hangs on for 6 to 8 hours, long after the meal stopped raising the blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog, on the other hand, begin working in about 10 minutes, peaks at one to one and a half hours and are gone in about three and a half to four hours. Many people who've tried these faster insulins report that their control is improved and that they feel better. The great advantage of fast insulins are that they match the "action time" for most meals. You can take them as you begin eating, rather than the 30 to 45 minutes prior to eating required of Regular. No longer do you need to accurately anticipate when you (or your young child with diabetes) will begin eating. In addition, Humalog and Novolog leave your body faster so you don't have residual insulin causing low blood sugars in the late afternoon or, even worse, in the middle of the night. For most meals, fast insulins will be lowering the blood sugar at the same time the food is raising it. The rise in the blood sugar seen in the couple of hours after eating is much lower, especially with Novolog, and by the end of three hours the blood sugar is often back to its starting point. With Humalog or Novolog, you're better equipped to prevent spiking blood sugar between meals, while avoiding the lows that result from the combined buildup of Regular and long-acting insulins. The new Lantus insulin is an excellent choice when using these fast insulins to cover meals. The clearly defined ac Continue reading >>

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