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How Long Does A Water Pump?

Determining The Lifespan Of A Well Pump? | A1 Well Drilling

Determining The Lifespan Of A Well Pump? | A1 Well Drilling

After making the investment of drilling a well, people often wonder how long their well pump will last. Water wells come in different sizes and have various uses, so there are many types of well pumps out there. These pumps have several variables that affect how long they will last. By analyzing these factors, you can determine how long it will be before you need a new pump. A water pumps duty cycle plays a large role in how long it will last. A duty cycle is how often the pump runs throughout the day. Some pumps are only called upon a few times a day, while others are under heavy or continuous use. Pumps that are frequently in use will have a much shorter lifespan than those that arent used often. It is also very important that the pump capacity matches the output rate that is safely recommended for a wells water yield. The type of motor that your well pump uses also plays a part in how long it will last. A larger motor with 1 horsepower will typically outlast a smaller, Horsepower engine for the same workload. The more horsepower your engine has, the longer it will typically last. Higher quality bearings within a motor also increase the lifespan of a well pump. Another thing to look out for is where your motor was manufactured. Your well drilling company can provide information on which manufacturers produce the highest quality motors. The sediment in the water plays a part in how long a water pump will last. Water sediment acts as an abrasive that wears down the bearings and moving parts within your pump. If the water in your area is filled with sediment, you will have to replace the pump sooner than areas with less sediment. For a well pump with a long lifespan, it is important that you hire the right company to do the installation. Make sure you hire a company tha Continue reading >>

About How Long Do You Expect A Good Water Pump To Last - Toyota Nation Forum : Toyota Car And Truck Forums

About How Long Do You Expect A Good Water Pump To Last - Toyota Nation Forum : Toyota Car And Truck Forums

Camry 3rd & 4th Gen (1992-1996 & 1997-2001)/1st Gen Solara (1999-2003) > About how long do you expect a good water pump to last In you experience about how long will a good water pump last in a well maintained car? I know standard procedure is to change it out with a timing belt change and I plan to do that. I have a rattle in the car and I am just wondering if it is likely to be a failing water pump or should I try and figure out exactly where and what it is before I get to the TB job. Right now it has 90,000 since swapped in new with the previous TB. I am hoping it is from the water pump as that will be coming out this summer with the TB anyway. The previous TB change also happened because a water pump rattle was noticed first. I am just not sure the rattle comes on the same way it did before but given the previous timing I just jumped right to that diagnosis.. well, since you're the one there on the spot with the car, you're gonna have to be the one to figure out where the rattle's coming from. could be wp, could be belt tensioner, could be a bad/cheap/incorrect pcv (ask me how i know - drove me nuts), and it could be stuff driven by the serpentine belt. why not remove that first and eliminate all the things driven by it? if it still rattles, then it's something inside the tb cover and you won't know what that is until you remove it. a 5 dollar h/f steth is the 5th thing to add to an essential DIY'ers toolbox, along with code scanner, dmm, owner's manual and haynes/fsm manuals. let us know what you find 'listening' around the engine room. I will put some more effort in trying to figure out the pattern of when it starts. It is not always when the engine is cold (that is what the last water pump did). The best pattern I can think of is under moderate load and trying t Continue reading >>

When To Replace Your Car's Water Pump

When To Replace Your Car's Water Pump

It's a good idea to change your car's water pump at the same time as the timing belt. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Angie's List magazine) Your car's water pump is out of sight, but don't keep it out of mind. The water pump receives little attention tucked away out of sight under your cars timing belt cover. But without a water pump, your car would overheat and you'd be left shopping around for a new engine. The water pump plays an important role in your cars cooling system and continually pumps coolant and water into the engine. Operated by the drive belt, blades on the pump allow coolant to flow into the engine. Although water pumps are built to last, they sometimes break down and require replacement. "Sadly, there are times that water pumps fail without any notice, says Lynn Beckwith, owner of Beckwiths Car Care in Humble, Texas. However, a small bit of attention can help you spot a possible problem. Water pumps can fail in several ways. They can leak and lose precious coolant, as well as fail internally with bearing and shaft issues, or have impellers fail." The electrical fuel pump transfers fuel from the fuel tank to the engine. It can last the life of your vehicle, but only if it's properly cared for. How to know when to replace the water pump A coolant leak near the timing belt often signals an issue with the water pump. "A coolant leak of any kind should never be ignored, and, when it's coming from under the timing belt cover, it's probably going to be from the water pump, Beckwith says. Overheating or a sudden change in the temperature gauge can also signal a problem. You can also check by pulling back and forth on the water pump pulley. Beckwith says if theres any play or you can move the water pump back and forth it could mean the shaft and bearings are loose. "W Continue reading >>

Chevy Small Block - Short Vs Long Water Pump

Chevy Small Block - Short Vs Long Water Pump

Chevy Small Block - Short vs Long Water Pump There are a just a couple basic things to consider when youre purchasing a new water pump. Do you have a short or long style pump, and is it v-belt or serpentine-belt driven ? Typically the small block Chevy (SBC) short pumps were used on 68 and earlier passenger cars and light duty trucks. With the exception to Corvettes, the SBC long water pump was typically used on 69 and up passenger cars and light duty trucks. Also, some of the later style aluminum water pumps with a serpentine-belt drive system used a reverse rotation pump. One other thing to consider is the diameter of your water pump snout. Chevy used two common sizes, which were either 5/8-inch or the heavy duty 3/4-inch. Keep in mind that mixing and matching pulleys between short and long pumps can cause misalignment issues. To be 100% sure before you order, the check is simple. Just set your original pump on a flat surface with the pulley flange facing up, take a straight edge and lay it across the pulley mount face and measure the distance between the block-side mount flange and pulley flange. All applications can vary and pulley alignment can change on custom set-ups. In certain cases it may be handy to purchase water pump pulley shims or spacers to achieve the correct alignment. Continue reading >>

How Long Does A Water Pump Last?

How Long Does A Water Pump Last?

NEXT Small parts on a car's engine are often easy to overlook, but those components are often some of the most important to keep everything running properly. In the case of keeping your engine cool, the water pump is an effective and integral part of the process. But how long can you expect it to last? The water pump endures constant use inside an engine and allows the engine to endure the intense heat that internal combustion produces. When your engine is on, the water pump circulates coolant, or antifreeze, in the cylinder head and the engine block to cool the engine down. After the coolant passes through the engine it's sent back into the radiator to be cooled before entering the engine again. When it comes to water pump longevity, they actually tend to last a long time. It's recommended that your engine's water pump be replaced when the timing belt is serviced. Water pumps are driven by the timing belt, or an accessory drive belt that spins a pulley outside of the pump which turns the internal impeller. On different makes and models of cars, these belts can last anywhere between 60,000 and 90,000 miles (96,561 to 144,841 kilometers), so you can expect your water pump to last about that long, too. Of course, some water pumps may not last quite that long, but manufacturers make efforts to ensure water pumps last a long time due to negative effects on the engine if they fail. To avoid running into the problem of a failed water pump, there are a couple warning signs that you can look for. The first is if coolant is leaking around the water pump. Weep holes located on the casing of the water pump will leak coolant when the pump is failing. The second red flag is if the water pump is making more noise than usual. This may be from a defective impeller or an impeller that's Continue reading >>

Water Pump Replacement Explained In 13 Easy Steps | Gates Europe

Water Pump Replacement Explained In 13 Easy Steps | Gates Europe

Always wait until the engine is cool before working on any part of the cooling system. Remove the belt drive components following the vehicle manufacturers recommended procedures. Remove the hose attached to the water pump. Be aware that a considerable amount of coolant can pour out of the hose when you take it off. Loosen the bolts and remove the old water pump. Remove the old seal/gasket or old sealant remains and make sure the mounting surface is clean. Before installing the new water pump, inspect the other cooling system service parts: coolant hoses , thermostat and pressure cap(s) . Install the new water pump. Do not force the pump on by striking the pump shaft. Old gaskets and seals should be replaced by new ones. Carefully follow installation instructions. Only apply sealant if specifically recommended by the vehicle manufacturer. Put an even bead of sealant along the edge of the part, but dont use too much sealant. If you do get too much sealant on the part, wipe off the excess before mounting the new water pump. Too much sealant compromises the correct installation and will break off within the cooling system, contaminating it. Sealants are also made with different drying rates, so respect the sealant's printed instructions. Tighten the bolts evenly to the manufacturers torque specifications. Refill the cooling system with the correct vehicle manufacturers recommended coolant. Manually rotate the pump and make sure it rotates freely. Make sure the belt drive system that will drive the new water pump is in perfect condition and installed following the vehicle manufacturers recommended procedures The belt drive system works hand in hand with the water pump. That is why according to Gates changing the water pump, belt and other drive components at the same time Continue reading >>

How Long Does A Water Pump Impeller Last

How Long Does A Water Pump Impeller Last

Welcome to the MarineEngine.com Boat Repair and Parts Forum! You can view forums as a guest. Please register or log in to actively participate. " When I went to pick up my 1972 Evinrude 85 hp today after a new power pack was installed, the mechanic asked me how old the water pump was. I told him that it's the original, so it's 30 yrs old. He said I might want to think about a new impeller, to save the nuisance of having it die at a very inopportune time. Even though this goes against my "if it's not broke - don't fix it philosphy" and having read just recently how the impeller flexes at various speeds, so thinking of how many times the thing has flexed over the years....I gave in and said to go ahead and replace it. Being that it's an electric shift and I guess that makes it a more difficult replacement...Do you think I did the right thing, or should I have waited until it died and replaced it then? FYI, the motor is used up here in Minnesota where the lakes are fresh water and usually pretty crystal clear, so degrading from abrasion of suspended solids isn't usually an issue. " Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of A Bad Or Failing Water Pump

Symptoms Of A Bad Or Failing Water Pump

Common signs include coolant leaks at the front-center of the car, loose water pump pulley, overheating engine, and steam coming from the radiator. by a top-rated mechanic at your home or office In order to run cool on those hot summer days, your engine needs to have a consistent flow of coolant supplied from the radiator throughout the engine. The water pump is the primary component responsible for maintaining this flow. When it works properly, your car will maintain a consistent operating temperature, run smoothly, and take you anywhere you need to travel. When the water pump fails or is beginning to wear out, it can lead to complete engine failure. When the water cooled (as opposed to air cooled) engine was introduced, many automotive experts believed that the water pump circulating coolant through the engine block was just as critical to engine protection as oil. This philosophy holds true even as technology has improved over the years to create more efficient cooling systems in today's modern cars. Your cars water pump is the key to making the entire system work. It is an impeller pump and is usually buried under the timing belt cover on the side of the engine. The pump is operated by the engines drive belt as the belt turns, the pump turns. Blades on the pump force coolant to flow through the engine and back to the radiator to be cooled by a forced air cooling fan. Although the water pumps in most modern cars, trucks, and SUVs will last a long time, they are by no means indestructible. Like any other mechanical device, they will produce a few warning signs that they are wearing out , so that car owners can contact a local ASE certified mechanic to replace the water pump before additional engine components are damaged. Here are some common symptoms that hint towar Continue reading >>

How Long Does A Well Pump Last Water Well Pump Replacement

How Long Does A Well Pump Last Water Well Pump Replacement

A Properly Sized Well Pump Should Last 8 to 10 Years A modern well pump installed by certified professionals should last for many years, but many homeowners find they do not have enough information when it comes to the age and condition of their well pump to know if it needs replacing. A well pump is a mechanism that drives water from the ground into a home. The pump is usually paired with a pressure tank, which evens the water pressure throughout the home and reduces the number of times the pump needs to turn on and off. If there seems to be a problem with your water pump, it could mean the pump is old and needs replacing. It could also mean the pump is undersized, or there are other problems with your water system. Calling professional water system specialists, like Skillings & Sons, will help you determine the source of the problem. Different Kinds of Well Pumps Knowing what kind of pump your home water system uses is the first step in determining the source of any pump problems. Jet Well Pumps Jet pumps come in two varieties, shallow and deep, and are often combined with a pressure tank. The shallow well pumps use a single pipe to draw water from about 25 feet. Deep well jet pumps can draw water from more than 100 feet and use a two-pipe system to draw water from the ground. Centrifugal Well Pumps Centrifugal pumps consist of one pipe inserted into the water column at a shallow depth, usually no more than 25 feet. The pump then sucks water from the ground and into the home. Submersible Well Pumps Submersible pumps are installed inside a home well and pumps water into the home only when needed. These are the most common type of well pump and can be used in deep wells. How Long Do Water Well Pumps Last? Submersible pumps, which are located in the well last 8 to 10 yea Continue reading >>

Definition Of Types Of Water Pumps And Life Expectancy Of Drinking Water Well Pumps & Pump Controls, Factors Affecting Water Pump Life And Pump Control Life

Definition Of Types Of Water Pumps And Life Expectancy Of Drinking Water Well Pumps & Pump Controls, Factors Affecting Water Pump Life And Pump Control Life

InspectAPedia tolerates no conflicts of interest. We have no relationship with advertisers, products, or services discussed at this website. Well pump definitions, types, & water pump life: This article series describes the different types of water pumps or well pumps, and we list the factors affecting the life expectancy of water pumps and we include a list of steps to take to maximize the life of a well or water pump and its motor. We also provide a MASTER INDEX to this topic, or you can try the page top or bottom SEARCH BOX as a quick way to find information you need. Green links show where you are. Copyright 2017 InspectApedia.com, All Rights Reserved. Life Expectancy of Water Pumps - varies by pump type, usage, and other factors In this article we discuss how long you can expect a water pump to last and what factors affect its life. Specifics of different types of water pumps can be read in detail at these articles: Well pump life depends - on pump type, duty cycle, usage, water chemistry, even voltage levels. An above-ground one line (shallow well) or two line (deep well) jet pump often operates for a considerable range ofyears, as few as 4 years or as many as 15 or 20 years before needing replacement. A typical well pump life expectancy (lumping both the electricpump motor and the pump assembly together) is about 10 years in the U.S. and Canada, and about 5 years in Mexico and Central America. Sketch of a jet pump shown at above left is courtesy of Carson Dunlop Associates . At below- left our sketch of a types of well water pumps is courtesy of Carson Dunlop Associates . The drawing shows the key differences between a one line jet pump, two line jet pump, and a submersible water pump. A submersible well pump, perhaps because the motor is kept cool by being imme Continue reading >>

Water Pump Replacement: The Dos And Donts

Water Pump Replacement: The Dos And Donts

Water pump replacement: the dos and donts Water pump replacement: the dos and donts Replacing a water pump requires a fair amount of technical expertise. Are you planning on installing a new water pump? These dos and donts will help you avoid 9 common mistakes. 1. Dont worry if the new water pump looks a little different from the old one It is possible that theres a visual difference between the new water pump youre about to install and the old pump you have just removed. Perhaps the new one has a metal paddle wheel while the old one had a plastic paddle wheel, or perhaps its shape is somewhat different. Dont worry about these minor differences; all that matters is the position of the water pump pulley. It should be at the same height as in the old pump because if the belt starts rubbing against the pulley it will become frayed. To check if youre good to go, simply put both water pumps on your workbench, face down (i.e. with the side that touches the engine), and compare the position of the pulley. Not flushing the cooling systemis a common mistake that could cost you dearly. After all, the old coolant is likely to be contaminated, and its impurities could settle where the dynamic seal is supposed to form. As a result, these impurities will cause scratches on the dynamic seal surface, which could, in turn, lead to premature pump failure.To remove all the debris from the cooling system, flushing is key. A hose and a standard cleansing agent might do, but using a flush tool like the Gates Power Clean Flush tool will help you to do the job properly. Tip: if you flush the cooling system with a water pump attached, use the old water pump and not the new one, to prevent impurities from contaminating the new pump. 3. Dont apply sealant to an O-ring or a dry seal When changing Continue reading >>

How To Tell If A Car's Water Pump Needs Replacement

How To Tell If A Car's Water Pump Needs Replacement

How to Tell if a Car's Water Pump Needs Replacement Your car's water pump is an important part of your vehicle. It is the part that continually pumps coolant to your vehicle's engine so that it doesn't overheat. A leak or a faulty bearing can cause serious damage to your car's engine. Puddles of coolant underneath your vehicle or high temperature readings may be signs that your water pump needs replacing. Let your car sit overnight, parked in a garage with a clean concrete floor. If it's not possible to park it inside on a clean concrete surface, place a piece of light-colored cardboard underneath your car directly under the motor. Be mindful that water pumps are more likely to leak while the vehicle engine is running, so this is a poor reference for finding a leak. Examine the cardboard the next morning. If it appears to be wet from coolant, you have a leak somewhere, possibly in your water pump, but other sources of leaking coolant could be radiator hoses, heater hoses, freeze plugs, gaskets, or the radiator itself. To narrow the search down, try to place the cardboard directly underneath the water pump itself. If you notice green liquid on the cardboard, it's antifreeze. This means you have a coolant leak somewhere. Check the water pump pulley. Find the round part at the front of your water pump that the belt is around. Attempt to rock the pulley back and forth. If it seems to be loose, it may be time to replace it, because the bearing is going bad. Listen to your car. Start your car's engine with the hood up. If you hear a low-pitched grinding noise, it may indicate that your water pump bearing is going bad. You can often hear it plainly if it's gone bad. You also have similar bearings in your AC compressor, power steering pump, and alternator, so you need to be ab Continue reading >>

Diagnosing And Resolving Water Pump Problems | Gates Europe

Diagnosing And Resolving Water Pump Problems | Gates Europe

Guidelines for replacing water pumps in 13 easy steps Appearance: The pump's internal mechanical seal seals the shaft towards the cooling circuit, protecting the bearings by preventing coolant from passing into the bearing assembly. When a water pump is new, some seepage from the weep hole is normal as it takes about ten minutes of operation for the mechanical seal to properly seat itself (break-in period). More pronounced seepage and drips from the weep hole after this break-in period or a large coolant bleed mark around the weep hole are abnormal and indicate impending water pump failure. Cause: Contaminated coolant is the main cause of weep hole leakage. Solution: Thoroughly flush the cooling system before installing the new pump and refill the system with the correct vehicle manufacturers recommended coolant. Never dry run a water pump, not even for a few seconds. Dry running of the pump ruins its mechanical seal. Replacing the water pump is critical for a complete overhaul. Find out more by downloading the product brochure. To share and download this file, please login or register . Appearance: Seepage, drips or large coolant bleed marks on or around the mounting surface or on the housing. Cause: Improper water pump installation or improper use of seals/gaskets or sealant. Solution: In case of a recently installed new water pump: carefully remove, check and re-install the water pump . Strictly follow the torque specifications. Make sure seals/gaskets are in perfect condition and are installed correctly. When sealant is prescribed, clean the rims of the part and the mounting surface and apply new sealant evenly along the edge of the part. If the leakage is not the consequence of an improperly installed new water pump, the pump must be replaced immediately. Appearan Continue reading >>

Automotive Engine Water Pump: How Many Miles Should Pumps Last?

Automotive Engine Water Pump: How Many Miles Should Pumps Last?

With Drivers Racking Up More Miles, Brakes Shouldn't Be Ignored The service life of most original equipment water pumps should be 100,000 miles or longer. Some cheap replacement water pumps, however, may not last 30,000 miles before they start to leak. Thats why you should recommend a top-quality replacement water pump if a customers old water pump has called it quits. Several factors can shorten the life of any water pump. These include internal corrosion in the cooling system (old neglected coolant that is worn out and should have been changed), as well as cavitation wear (which can be a problem with some water pumps that have plastic impellers). The pump shaft is supported by bearings, and there is usually a ceramic seal around the shaft. Antifreeze contains lubricants for the shaft bearing, as well as corrosion inhibitors to prevent internal rust and corrosion. But these additives eventually wear out over time. If the coolant is worn out or dirty, it will shorten the life of the water pumps bearings and seals, as well as other cooling system components. A water pump with bad bearings may make noise and/or wobble as it turns. There should be no play or movement in the pump shaft if the pump pulley is wiggled sideways by hand when the engine is off. Coolant leaking out of the vent hole on the housing means the shaft seal has failed and the pump needs to be replaced. If an engine has been overheating, but the coolant level is full and there are no signs of coolant leaks externally or internally (such as a bad head gasket), the problem may be the water pump impeller. Steel impellers can rust or even separate from the shaft. Plastic impellers can erode and wear down, reducing the pumps ability to circulate coolant. Either way, a pump that isnt pumping very well needs to Continue reading >>

Replacing Your Water Pump

Replacing Your Water Pump

Bombing down the interstate, you glance at the odometer and realize you've just reached an automotive milestone: 100,000 miles with no major repairs. Time was a car that had passed its belly over that much real estate was considered pretty much used up, but yours still runs great and looks practically new. Amazing how technology has advanced. Then you notice the temperature gauge. Holy smokes--pegged! You put it in neutral, coast off onto the shoulder and shut her down. There's that maple-syrup-spilled-on-the-radiator odor again--you've smelled it before, but filed it under "things to think about later." Sooner would've been better--now you're walking. The biggest change in water pump design occurred decades ago when the spring-loaded mechanical seal was adopted. However, its rubber parts may disintegrate if the engine overheats, and its polished sealing faces can wear and warp if the engine is run dry. Typically, pumps will start leaking catastrophically shortly after a boil-over. This kind of failure can be worse than it sounds. Besides the vastly expensive internal engine damage that running without coolant may cause, a leaking seal can wash away the shaft bearing's lubricant, perhaps resulting in a snapped shaft, and a flying fan or belt pulley can destroy the radiator or even dent the hood. So, leakage is the No. 1 failure. Noise is second, and is always indicative of a terminal condition. While service literature on water pumps often will show a picture of a badly eroded impeller that contributes to overheating, technicians say that's not as common as it once was. Another possible problem with the same consequences is an impeller that's come loose from its shaft. Erosion of the inside surfaces of the pump chamber caused by cavitation (a weak cap or a chronically Continue reading >>

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