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How Long Does A Medtronic Cgm Transmitter Last

Diabetes Technology: Dexcom G5 Cgm Review - So Much Wasted Potential

Diabetes Technology: Dexcom G5 Cgm Review - So Much Wasted Potential

As you may know, I'm a Type 1 Diabetic and have been for well over 20 years. I wear a Medtronic Insulin Pump 24 hours a day and use a Dexcom CGM (Continuous Glucose Meter) to monitor my blood sugar, also 24 hours a day. This post won't explain how diabetes works to you, so check these posts out (or this video) first if you're not familiar. Moving from a Dexcom G4 to a Dexcom G5 A CGM (Continuous Glucose Meter) doesn't keep you from pricking your fingers. You'll still do finger sticks in order to calibrate a CGM, at least twice a day. The Dexcom G4 "with Share" worked like this. There was a small transmitter that is attached to me, and it talks a proprietary RF wireless format to a Receiver and then the Receiver talks Bluetooth LE to your iPhone, like this picture below. Once the sugar number got to my iPhone it's then optionally uploaded to the Dexcom Share Cloud. My wife can install the Dexcom Follow application on her iPhone and see my sugar on her phone. She also gets the same notifications and warnings I get. When you "upgrade" to the G5 from the G4, you'll likely do what I did. I called Dexcom support to see if I was eligible. They had a US$199 upgrade fee which I paid, and the G5 transmitter showed up a week later. I then called them back to get an "upgrade code" which was a 12 digit unique number (GUID) that I had to enter into their Dexcom Studio application on my Windows machine. I plugged in my Dexcom G4 with Share Receiver to my Windows machine using Microsoft USB and ran the upgrader. I needed that upgrade key. Then about 20 minutes later the G4 receiver (remember it talked RF to the G4 transmitter) is now a G5 and only speaks Bluetooth directly to the Bluetooth-enabled G5 transmitter. That means it works like this now: The G5 software that runs on the iPhon Continue reading >>

Review: Medtronic’s Minimed 630g Insulin Pump

Review: Medtronic’s Minimed 630g Insulin Pump

I have used the Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System by Medtronic for the past 30 days. This review is my opinion of the pump, both positive and negative. I have used insulin pumps since I got my first Disetronic H-Tron V-100 in 1994. I got a Minimed 506 pump in 1998 and have been a fan of the Minimed/Medtronic pumps since. Until now. Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System The Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System comes with the pump, the CGM transmitter, and a Contour Next Link 2.4 blood glucose meter. The three devices work well together, once set up right. Medtronic also has an early access program. This lets you buy the Minimed 630G now, and upgrade to the upcoming Minimed 670G in spring of 2017. Receiving the Pump The 630G Pump comes in several boxes. The pump comes in an 8″x10″x2.25″ box that has the pump and several small items like clips, batteries, a manual, and a quick start guide. Another box of the same size has the Contour Next Link 2.4 meter. A second box arrived a few days later with the infusion sets and reservoirs, followed by another box a few days later with the CGM sensors. I got another box a week later with the CGM transmitter. In the past, the local Medtronic trainer would call me to train me on using the pump, with a request not to use it before the training. I normally ignore this request, since I have used Minimed pumps for so long. I do go to these trainings every once in a while, but I was never contact this time. Unusual, considering how new this version of the pump is. Even so, the pump was fairly easy to set up. I also got a pile of 8.5″x11″ manuals. One was a “previous pump users manual” and one was a “pump users manual’. There was a large manual in the box that had everything in it. And another “how to use the CGM” manual. Quite d Continue reading >>

Medtronic 530g Insulin Pump And Enlite Sensor Review

Medtronic 530g Insulin Pump And Enlite Sensor Review

Back in May I upgraded to the new Medtronic 530G insulin pump and Enlite sensor. I started the new pump right away but I waited until I used up some of my old sensors (since Medtronic wouldn’t take back the ones I had bought with the old sensor after upgrading to the new sensor) and finally switched over to the Enlite two weeks ago. Insulin pump: It’s essentially the same as my old pump. It does have the threshold suspend feature in place but I don’t have it activated because it still concerns me how it handles my blood sugars. Being pregnant, there is a fine line between “low” and “too low”. Technically, I should be starting pre-meals as low as 60mg/dl but then if I’m in the 50’s I feel really low and drop quickly to 40’s. If I were to use the threshold suspend feature, I’m not sure what I would set it to, so for the time being, I’m not using the feature. One thing I LOVE about the new pump is the pink color. In the past ten years or so I’ve basically stuck with the grey/clear insulin pump because it was more “professional” looking and I didn’t want to draw a lot of attention to it. Now that I’m older and don’t care as much and I also work from home, I thought it was time for a change so I changed the color to PINK! One negative I have noticed about the pump is the battery life. I never wrote down concrete data but I’m pretty sure my old pump would only need a new battery every month or two. My husband bought a big pack of batteries for me and I didn’t go through them very fast. Now on the new pump, I probably go through a new battery at least once per week! One time I changed my battery and 36 hours later I needed to change it again. It could have been the battery but since they were from the same pack, I’m thinking it had mor Continue reading >>

Cgm Sensor Delays Plaguing Medtronic | Diabetesmine

Cgm Sensor Delays Plaguing Medtronic | Diabetesmine

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Not surprisingly, there's been a lot of hype about Medtronic's new 670G "hybrid closed loop" semi-automated insulin delivery system since it was approved by the FDA just over a year ago. After all, it's the first of its kind -- so far the only "pre-Artificial Pancreas" technology connecting an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor with smart algorithms that's gotten the green light from regulators, much quicker than anyone expected in fact. Truly, there's a lot to be exited about. Yet despite all the good vibes (and mostly good press), Medtronic has faced a number of speed bumps over the past year -- from the company's slower-than-announced rollout that left many would-be customers frustrated, its inability to keep up with the high demand for CGM sensors and other supplies, to Anthem's initial refusal to cover the 670G, and Hurricane Maria in September hobbling Medtronic's Puerto Rico manufacturing operations. Of course any company can be hit with operational snags, or be affected by a natural disaster. But what makes this particularly alarming for the D-Community is the contracting of the diabetes device market these days, with a Nov. 12 Star Tribune story noting that some now see Medtronic as the "only game in town" for some of these products. With the insulin pump market shrinking and access to diabetes necessities becoming more uncertain, Medtronic is edging ever closer to monopolizing this med-tech segment and that means people with diabetes may not have many options except to make do. Bottom line: Many patients face fewer choices, and are afraid of being left twisting in the wind if they can't even get acces Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Tech On The Horizon: What’s Coming By Mid-2017 In The Us?

New Diabetes Tech On The Horizon: What’s Coming By Mid-2017 In The Us?

By Lynn Kennedy, Ava Runge, and Adam Brown What Abbott, Dexcom, LifeScan, Medtronic, Tandem, and others are bringing to make diabetes easier and less burdensome Want more news just like this? We’re living in the most exciting time ever in diabetes technology, and a slew of soon-to-launch products are going to subtract hassle from living with diabetes – fewer injections and fingersticks, less math, less data overload, less pain, and less worry. Equally important, most emerging technology shows excellent potential to improve glucose outcomes that matter, among them hypoglycemia, time-in-range, hyperglycemia, and A1c. Curious what’s coming? Read on for a summary of the insulin delivery and glucose monitoring devices expected to launch in the US by mid-2017 or earlier, based on the most recent company timelines (listed chronologically). This list is not fully comprehensive, but does cover the major device launches expected. A more detailed description of each device follows further below. New Insulin Delivery Devices Tandem’s t:slim X2 Insulin Pump – October-December 2016. The latest Tandem pump will add a new Bluetooth radio and enable software updates to add future Dexcom G5 connectivity and automated insulin delivery algorithms. Medtronic MiniMed Pro Infusion Set with BD FlowSmart technology – around late 2016. The long-awaited infusion set has several key improvements, most notably a new catheter that allows insulin to flow out of two holes (less occlusions). LifeScan’s OneTouch Via – early 2017. The bolus-only, super slim wearable device holds 200 units of insulin and can be worn for three days. Squeezing two buttons (including through clothes) – will discreetly deliver a two-unit bolus. Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G/Enlite 3 Hybrid Closed Loop – by Ap Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems (cgm) Medtronic & Dexcom Review & Comparison

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems (cgm) Medtronic & Dexcom Review & Comparison

Since my first detailed report comparing the various Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems (CGMs) back in 2014, a lot has happened. And not much has changed. The systems have improved in terms of accuracy, features and ease of use, but the main players remain the same (Medtronic and Dexcom). Access via insurance coverage and professional loaner systems has grown exponentially, yet less than 20% of those eligible for CGM are currently using them. In many cases, insurers make the process of receiving coverage onerous and needlessly complex. This doesn’t even touch on Medicare, which continues to sit idly by with its head up its proverbial butt while older Americans suffer needlessly from dangerous glucose swings. New and improved software programs (plus a brilliant new book called “Practical CGM”) provide guidance on how to interpret/analyze CGM reports, yet few patients bother to look at their own data, and very few healthcare providers have the expertise to convert the reports into useful therapeutic insight to help guide their patients. So let’s get down to business. How do the latest Medtronic and Dexcom CGM systems compare? Dexcom’s latest and greatest, the G5, features a transmitter that sends data directly to either a handheld receiver or a mobile phone. Dexcom’s G5 Mobile App displays data on the phone and generates the various alerts; Dexcom’s Clarity App generates reports for retrospective analysis. G5, as well as G4 Platinum, utilizes Dexcom’s up-to-date 505 algorithm for translating subcutaneous electrical impulses into glucose values. Why call it 505? My best guess is that Medtronic copyrighted every other number below 1000. (for some reason, they skipped 505 when naming their various pumps) Medtronic’s latest CGM features their new-generati Continue reading >>

*attention Cgm Users* Time To Change?

*attention Cgm Users* Time To Change?

Have you or a loved one taken advantage of the recent Federal Government CGM subsidy initiative? A CGM has the potential to change the lives of young people with type 1 diabetes and their carers, but its important to know how to correctly use it. It has come to the attention of Diabetes WA that there may be confusion amongst CGM users about how often to change the transmitters on their CGM. Heres the facts; The glucose sensor is the tiny electrode that sits under your skin and measures your glucose levels. Timespan: Each glucose sensor can be worn for around one week, depending on the product manufacturer (see table below). Glucose sensors have a 6-month expiration date from the time they are manufactured. The expiration date is on the outside of the glucose sensor box and on each individual glucose sensor package. The transmitteris the small, lightweight device that attaches to the glucose sensor, gathers your glucose data, and sends it wirelessly to the larger monitoring and display device. Timespan: If used continuously, the transmitter has a life of approximately 3-12 months, depending on the product manufacturer (see table below). The below information specifies the usage timeframes and the compatible sensors and transmitters for each CGM device. The lifespan field shows how long each sensor and transmitter should be used for, this is not to say that the sensor or transmitter will cease to function after these timeframes, it is the recommended timeframes supplied by the manufacturer. Continue reading >>

Caring For Your Sensor & Transmitter | Medtronic Diabetes

Caring For Your Sensor & Transmitter | Medtronic Diabetes

It is recommended to recharge the transmitter after each sensor use (that is every 3 days). If a green light on the transmitter is lit or flashing, do not connect it to the charger. The transmitter will not charge with its green light on. Wait for the green light to turn off (approximately 30 seconds), then connect the transmitter to the charger. Connect the transmitter to the charger by lining it up, flat side down, with the charger. Push the two components together fully. Within 10 seconds after the transmitter is connected, a green light on the charger will flash for 1-2 seconds as the charger powers on. For the rest of the charging time, the charger's green light will continue to flash in a pattern of 4 flashes with a pause between the 4 flashes. When charging is complete, the green light on the charger will stay on, without flashing, for 15-20 seconds and then turn off. After the green charger light turns off, disconnect the transmitter from the charger. The green light on the transmitter will flash for about 5 seconds and then turn off. Turn the sensor feature OFF to avoid getting a LOST SENSOR alert. Store the transmitter, charger and tester in a clean, dry location at room temperature. Although not required, you may store the transmitter on the charger. If the transmitter is not in use, you must charge the transmitter at least once every 60 days. Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring: Everything You Need To Know

Continuous Glucose Monitoring: Everything You Need To Know

Continuous glucose monitors or CGMs can be a lifesaving device for people with any type of diabetes. They continually check your blood sugar 24 hours a day and alert you you before you begin experiencing low or high blood sugar levels. They can reduce the number of times you have to check your blood sugar each day which is welcome news for everyone with diabetes! Insurance coverage is changing this year with Medicare jumping on board also, so this is the time to learn about this awesome piece of technology available to you. I know there are a lot of questions surrounding the use of continuous glucose monitoring, so we will break it all down here for you! What is a CGM and how does it work? Is it right for me? Will I still have to check my blood sugar? What choices do I have currently on the market? Will my insurance cover a CMG? How much will it cost? Can I travel and play sports with a CGM? In this article I will answer all your questions. What Is Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM)? A continuous glucose monitoring system or CGM is a system that does just what it sounds like, it monitors you glucose (blood sugar) continuously…well, every 5 minutes, 24 hours a day! You are able to see what your blood sugars are with a receiver; the data is transmitted from a sensor which is inserted right beneath your skin which is attached to a transmitter which sends the data to the receiver. Now, the newest system are even integrated with a Smartphone; with this advancement you can check your data right from your cell phone. For parents with children, this technology is peace of mind, allowing them to check their child’s blood glucose level any time-day or night. There are two different types of systems: The first is a personal continuous glucose monitoring system that you wear a Continue reading >>

Www.realitycheck.org.au

Www.realitycheck.org.au

This is a secure and safe place for people to bitch, moan, argue, or rejoice (yes, really) about having Type 1 Diabetes. If something has inspired you or enraged you, here's your opportunity to let everyone know. I am looking at the costs between dexcom and Medtronic CGM. THe Dexcom transmitter as I understand, eg the G4 lasts 6 months then needs replacing The Medtronic transmitter. ie the thing that is attached to the skin that sends the signal. This gets recharged each time, so in theory may last forever, but does it really last forever? Or does it only last a year or so? And then does it then cost XX to replace? If used continuously, the transmitter has a life of approximately 12 months. Re: Medtronic CGM transmitter how long lasts by straygaijin Mon Aug 22, 2016 7:15 pm I've had a Medtronic transmitter for about 6 years. The first two years I used it continually, since then about 3 weeks every 3 months. I still get about 1 week use between charges. The plastic of the transmitter is starting to crack so it may not last too much longer but it is still waterproof. Re: Medtronic CGM transmitter how long lasts My first Medtronic transmitter lasted about 15 months. I was then given one because of the deal I'd signed up for comprising transmitter and sensors. To buy they are about $700.They are under warranty for 12 months. Re: Medtronic CGM transmitter how long lasts My first transmitter I got over four years with almost constant use. Then almost four yrs from the next one, only Cha bed as I upgraded to the 640g a month ago and got a new transmitter to synch to the new pump. P.s I had issues with this one within an lonth and they have just replaced with the brand spanking new model which was just released in early August so a heads up for those on the 640g, the new trans Continue reading >>

Medtronic 640g And Enlite Sensor Life

Medtronic 640g And Enlite Sensor Life

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community On the Veo I could always get an extra 24 hours beyond the 6 day sensor life by immediately restarting my old sensor as a new sensor. Since having the 640g and new Guardian transmitter I've not been able to extend the sensor life beyond 6 days whatever I try either by reconnect old sensor/start new sensor/find lost sensor etc. The extra 24 hours on the old transmitter and Veo gave me time, if the sensor ended at an inconvenient time, to keep CGM running until I was able to insert a new sensor plus it was always on the same day of the week. Has anyone on the 640g and Enlite sensors had any luck in extending the sensor duration beyond 6 days and if so please can you tell me what you did? Thanks. I certainly haven't,but will keep trying different ways! Flowerpot are you on facebook? I definitely know some people on their have extended their sensors... I couldn't tell you specifically how because I don't have a pump/Cgm yet so it's all slightly 'foreign' to me, but I do know I've seen people with 640gs extend them because I was thinking how good that was... If you do have facebook I *think* I saw it in the group 'T1-cgm information'... Thanks @-Artemis- , I'm not on facebook but will have a look around to see what I can discover about restarting the sensor after 6 days. Fingers crossed something works ! you have to take the transmitter off, give it a little charge and then reattach and then start new sensor that could well be a challenge too far for me as I'm partially sighted and struggle to see well enough to connect the transmitter to the sensor in the first place. I'll have a try and see if it is possible. It's interesting that the transmitter battery Continue reading >>

Sensors And Transmitters Support | Medtronic Diabetes

Sensors And Transmitters Support | Medtronic Diabetes

The glucose sensor is a tiny electrode that sits under the skin in your interstitial fluid (which is where cells get oxygen and nutrients, including glucose) and measures glucose levels. Glucose sensors are easily inserted using an automatic insertion device. Like many types of infusion sets, a needle is used to introduce the glucose sensor but is then removed leaving just the tiny flexible electrode just under the skin. The glucose sensor is then connected either to a transmitter or recorder so the readings from the glucose sensor can either be transmitted to your insulin pump or monitor, or recorded for downloading to software once removed. Do I still need to do fingerstick readings if I use the MiniMed Veo System? The CGM feature of the MiniMed Veo System does not replace fingerstick measurements. You still need to use your blood glucose meter to confirm a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) reading before treating or to calibrate the CGM system. What are the highest and lowest glucose alarm thresholds that I can set? High alarm thresholds can be set as high as 400mg/dL (or 22.2 mmol/L) and the minimum low alarm threshold can be set as low as 40mg/dL (or 2.2 mmol/L). High and low threshold ranges can be customised by the user. You should discuss your personal threshold levels and alert settings with your healthcare provider. The high and low glucose alarms have to be at least 10 mg/dL (or .6 mmol/L) apart. If you set your high glucose limit at 180 mg/dL (or 10 mmol/L), then you cannot set your low glucose limit greater than 170 mg/dL (or 9.4 mmol/L). Conversely, if you set your low glucose limit at 50 mg/dL (or 2.8 mmol/L) then you cannot set your high limit lower than 60 mg/dL (or 3.4 mmol/L). How long do glucose sensors last? Do they expire? Each glucose sensor ca Continue reading >>

Are Implantable Cgms The Wave Of The Future?

Are Implantable Cgms The Wave Of The Future?

Science appears to be overtaking fiction as a continuous glucose monitor implanted under the skin for three months or more is now being sold in Europe and could become available in the U.S. this year. Though not without its critics, the new technology represents a significant step forward in the development of implantable glucose monitoring for diabetics. “Implantables are the future,” says Mirasol Panlilio, Vice President of Global Sales and Marketing for Senseonics. “Whether we are talking about drug delivery systems, or monitoring systems, there are many implantables out there and many more coming.” Sensonics’ Eversense is an implantable CGM sensor system that is now available in Africa and in many countries in Europe. It lasts up to 90 days between the need for reimplantation at a doctor’s office. Panlilio says. She adds that the sensor as now designed can actually last 180 days and will, in the near future, be marketed as such. “It’s a fluorescence-based product implanted under the skin,” Panlilio says. “The technology means that it doesn’t have to be removed and reinserted on a weekly basis, like most of the other monitors now on the market,” such as those made by Abbott, Dexcom, and Medtronic that need to have their subcutaneous cannula replaced every seven to 14 days. The sensor itself is about half the length of a matchstick and is implanted usually, but not always, in a patient’s upper arm. The sensor, which is housed in a biocompatible material, measures glucose levels from interstitial fluid just below the skin surface on a continuous basis, just like other monitors. Compared to other CGM monitors, Eversense stacks up favorably in accurately reading glucose levels. “Senseonics’ Eversense CGM has shown exceptional results in a cl Continue reading >>

Failure Of Minimed Cgm Transmitter?

Failure Of Minimed Cgm Transmitter?

Member T1 since 1994. MM 522 pump/CGM since 2009. How long does the transmitter last? Years? Not the sensor, but the actual transmitter. Are they meant to last forever, or does some component eventually fail in it. Maybe the rechargeable internal battery? Also, HOW does it die? Is it a sudden failure where it just stops, or can you tell if it's going to fail soon? I'd like to know because I plan on going on a holiday but don't want to take along an extra "just-in-case" transmitter. The one I currently have is about 1.5 years old. How old is yours? I think their warranty is 6-8 months, which is a total joke. Mine just died and it was about 14 months old. The way I knew something wasn't right was when I charged if for 30 minutes - unplugged it - and there was NO flashing green light. I went ahead and plugged it into my sensor and again - no flashing green light. When this happened, it indicated my transmitter was dead. Lifespan varies like many things. I called the MM hotline and we did the testing and they also stated that it appeared the transmitter was dead. Pretty darn expensive 6-8 month warranty item. I was talking to a friend about this transmitter from mini med. It is our experience that the transmitter starts losing accuracy usually within about 6 to 7 months, and this has happened multiple times with multiple transmitters over the years. I came home from work one day to have smoke pour out the door of my house when I opened it, and to find my son on the floor in an insulin seizure. His food he was cooking was burning on the stove. His transmitter had failed, and the CGM was giving him readings about 40 points higher than they actually were that day. This was the last straw and was the end of him using mini med's CGM system. It is dangerous. My friend, who is ve Continue reading >>

Guardian Connect Faq | Medtronic-diabetes.com.au

Guardian Connect Faq | Medtronic-diabetes.com.au

The Guardian Connect system measures glucose in the body and sends it to the Guardian Connect app approximatively every five minutes (about 288 readings a day). The transmitter communicates with the mobile app via Bluetooth connection. The mobile app utilises wireless connection to send data to CareLink Personal. Your care partners can also access your information from the CareLink website on most smartphones, tablets, or computers. These must be connected to the internet to receive information. Care partners can also elect to receive SMS messages for any applicable alerts. Guardian Connect will be available on the MiniMed eShop as a subscription. Please note - your healthcare professional will need to sign an order form before you can be granted access to purchase a subscription. A Medtronic representative will be in touch with you on how to purchase the subscription via the MiniMed eShop as anexclusive deal. How long will it take me to get initially set up? Depending on the person, it is estimated that it will take two hours to set up the Guardian Connect system. It is estimated to take approximately one hour to insert your sensor the first time, pair your transmitter, and set up the app. Once inserted, it will take up to approximately two hours for the sensor to warm up. How does CGM differ from Flash Glucose Monitoring? The Guardian Connect System is real-time Continuous Glucose Monitoring with sensor glucose readings provided every five minutes. Flash does not provide a continuous transmition or display of data, but relies on patients scanning the sensor. CGM is prescribed to patients who are hypo prone, hypo unaware, poorly controlled, or with significant glucose variability. The key benefits of CGM for these patients are ensuring excursions are detected by the s Continue reading >>

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