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How Long Do You Have To Wait Between Shots Of Insulin?

Diabetics Can Eat Right After Using Insulin: Study

Diabetics Can Eat Right After Using Insulin: Study

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People with type 2 diabetes are sometimes told to wait after using insulin for the drug to work its way into the body before they can begin eating, but a new study from Germany says that’s not necessary. In a group of about 100 diabetics, researchers found that blood sugar levels remained steady regardless of whether or not participants left a 20 to 30-minute gap between using insulin and eating a meal. The diabetics overwhelmingly preferred being able to eat right away, too. “It’s a very promising result. It will lead to better adherence and satisfaction,” said Dr. Aaron Cypess, a staff endocrinologist in the clinic of the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston who was not involved in the study. Insulin gives glucose - or blood sugar - access to the body’s cells to be used as fuel. But in type 2 diabetes cells are resistant to insulin or the body doesn’t make enough of the hormone, so glucose remains in the bloodstream and can climb to dangerously high levels. Injectable insulin is available for diabetics in a newer fast-acting form, but it’s expensive and many still use human insulin, which takes some time to become active in the body. So doctors often recommend waiting to eat after using human insulin to prevent blood sugar spikes. Not all experts think waiting is necessary, though, according to the researchers led by Nicolle Mueller of Universitätsklinikum Jena. To see what difference it makes, Mueller and her colleagues randomized type 2 diabetics into two groups. For four weeks, one group of 49 people waited 20 minutes to eat after using human insulin. Then they switched to eating immediately after injecting insulin for another four weeks. A second group of 48 diabetics did the same in reverse order, eating immediately after in Continue reading >>

Insulin Therapy

Insulin Therapy

Why do I need to take insulin? When you digest food, your body changes most of the food you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells of your body and be used as energy. When you have diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use it properly, so the glucose builds up in your blood instead of moving into the cells. Too much glucose in the blood can lead to serious health problems. All people who have type 1 diabetes and some people who have type 2 diabetes need to take insulin to help control their blood sugar levels. The goal of taking insulin is to keep your blood sugar level in a normal range as much as possible so you’ll stay healthy. Insulin can’t be taken by mouth. It is usually taken with injections (shots). It can also be taken with an insulin pen or an insulin pump. How often will I need to take insulin? You and your doctor will develop a schedule that is right for you. Most people who have diabetes and take insulin need at least 2 insulin shots a day for good blood sugar control. Some people need 3 or 4 shots a day. Do I need to monitor my blood sugar level? Yes. Monitoring and controlling your blood sugar is key to preventing the complications of diabetes. If you don’t already monitor your blood sugar level, you will need to learn how. Checking your blood sugar involves pricking your finger to get a small drop of blood that you put on a test strip. You can read the results yourself or insert the strip into a machine called an electronic glucose meter. The results will tell you whether or not your blood sugar is in a healthy range. Your doctor will give you additional information about monitoring your blood sugar. When should I take insulin? You and your doctor should discuss when and how you Continue reading >>

Diabetes Patients Can Eat Immediately After Taking Insulin

Diabetes Patients Can Eat Immediately After Taking Insulin

People with type 2 diabetes no longer have to wait to eat after taking insulin…. People with type 2 diabetes are sometimes told to wait after using insulin for the drug to work its way into the body before they can begin eating, but a new study from Germany indicates that it is not necessary to wait. In a group of about 100 diabetics, researchers found that blood sugar levels remained steady regardless of whether or not participants left a 20 to 30-minute gap between using insulin and eating a meal. The diabetics overwhelmingly preferred being able to eat right away, too. The result of the study can lead to better adherence and satisfaction. Injectable insulin is available for diabetics in a newer fast-acting form, but it’s expensive and many still use human insulin, which takes some time to become active in the body. So doctors often recommend waiting to eat after using human insulin to prevent blood sugar spikes. Not all experts think waiting is necessary, though, according to the researchers led by Nicolle Mueller of Universitätsklinikum Jena. To see what difference it makes, Mueller and her colleagues randomized type 2 diabetics into two groups. For four weeks, one group of 49 people waited 20 minutes to eat after using human insulin. Then they switched to eating immediately after injecting insulin for another four weeks. A second group of 48 diabetics did the same in reverse order, eating immediately after injection for the first four weeks, then observing a waiting period for the next four. Using a blood test that measures average glucose levels over time, the researchers found that all the participants had generally higher than ideal blood sugar levels but the difference in those levels between periods when they waited or didn’t wait to eat after insulin i Continue reading >>

Interval Between Insulin Injection And Eating In Relation To Blood Glucose Control In Adult Diabetics.

Interval Between Insulin Injection And Eating In Relation To Blood Glucose Control In Adult Diabetics.

In a survey of 225 diabetics treated with insulin 24 (10.6%) claimed never to have received advice concerning the interval between insulin injection and eating. Of the remainder, 67 (33%) admitted disregarding advice and using shorter intervals. There was a significant (p less than 0.01) difference between the reported frequencies of clinical hypoglycaemia in patients using different intervals. The effects on glucose control of intervals between insulin injection and breakfast of zero, 15, 30, and 45 minutes were studied for periods of one week in 11 patients with type I diabetes who were receiving twice daily injections of monocomponent porcine insulins and high fibre, high carbohydrate diets, using standard home blood glucose monitoring techniques to measure blood glucose concentrations each morning. The delay of 45 minutes resulted in the lowest frequency of hypoglycaemia and the most acceptable pattern of glucose concentrations measured one and two hours after breakfast and before lunch. Combining results obtained at these three times, the mean increment in blood glucose concentration was smaller after allowing a delay of 45 minutes than after delays of zero (p less than 0.001), 15 (p less than 0.03), and 30 (NS) minutes. A delay of 30 minutes resulted in smaller mean increments in blood glucose concentration than did delays of zero (p less than 0.001) and 15 (NS) minutes. These results suggest that this aspect of diabetic management may be neglected, with important consequences for blood glucose control. An increase in delay between insulin injection and eating to 45 minutes would be a simple and safe way of improving blood glucose control in at least the 37% of the diabetic population surveyed in this study who currently allow less than 15 minutes. Full text Full Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

How often should I test my blood sugar? This is a very common question, and the answer isn't the same for everyone. In general, you should test as often as you need to get helpful information. There's no point in testing if the information you get doesn't help you manage your diabetes. If you've been told to test at certain times, but you don't know why or what to do with the test results, then testing won't seem very meaningful. Here are some general guidelines for deciding how often to test: If you can only test once a day, then do it before breakfast. Keep a written record so that you can see the pattern of the numbers. If you control your blood sugar by diet and exercise only, this once-a-day test might be enough. If you take medicine (diabetes pills or insulin), you will probably want to know how well that medicine is working. The general rule is to test before meals and keep a record. If you want to know how your meals affect your blood sugar, testing about 2 hours after eating can be helpful. Test whenever you feel your blood sugar is either too high or too low. Testing will give you important information about what you need to do to raise or lower your blood sugar. If you take more than 2 insulin shots a day or use an insulin pump, you should test 4 to 6 times a day. You should test more often if you're having unusually high or low readings, if you're sick, under more stress than usual, or are pregnant. If you change your schedule or travel, you should also test your blood sugar more often than usual. Talk to a member of your health care team about how often to test based on your personal care plan. What should my test numbers be? There isn't one blood sugar target that's right for everyone with diabetes. It's important to work with your health care team to set Continue reading >>

Levemir® Works With Other Diabetes Medicines

Levemir® Works With Other Diabetes Medicines

Do not share your Levemir® FlexTouch® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Never inject Levemir® into a vein or muscle. Do not share your Levemir FlexTouch with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. Before taking Levemir®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should ch Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful as people imagine because the needles are short and thin. Insulin shots are given into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. The following instructions are for using most disposable insulin pens. If you are using a refillable pen, check with your doctor, diabetes educator or pharmacist on how to use. If you prefer to use a vial and syringe, refer to UPMC patient education page Insulin: How to Give a Shot. ADVANTAGES of insulin pens: Easy to use and carry Looks like a pen for writing (discreet/not easily noticed) No need to draw the insulin dose from a vial/bottle Can be used for most insulin types Doses can be easily dialed Less waste of expired insulin if not much insulin is used within time period designated (300 units in each pen)…see table end of this document To some people it may be less scary than a syringe DISADVANTAGES: Cannot mix different kinds of insulin together in a prescribed dose. Before you give the shot, you will need the following: Insulin pen Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Pen needle (be sure your doctor writes your prescription for the pen needles as well as the specific type of insulin pen) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of an Insulin Pen Wash your hands. Check the drug label to be sure it is what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date on the pen. Do not use a drug that is past the expiration date. Also do not use if beyond number of days listed in table at end of this document once opened and in use. Remove pen cap Continue reading >>

Using Insulin With I-port Advance®

Using Insulin With I-port Advance®

What should I do if my blood sugar remains unexplainably high after injecting my insulin through i-Port Advance®? Can I apply and use a new i-Port Advance® just prior to bedtime? Continue reading >>

Timing Is Everything | Pet Diabetes Care

Timing Is Everything | Pet Diabetes Care

A friend recently told me that she always comes up with the perfect comeback. Her problem is that she thinks of it 20 minutes too late. Yep, sometimes timing is everything. When it comes to diabetes care of our pets, timing can make the difference between a well regulated diabetic pet and a “mostly” regulated diabetic pet. Routines may not be exciting, but routines make for a well-regulated diabetic pet! After two plus decades practicing veterinary medicine, I sometimes think I have heard it all. Then a client comes along and proves me wrong. Recently one of my own veterinary clients told me he routinely gave his cat the insulin then waited an hour before feeding his pet. I don’t know where this client got this notion as I had told him what I tell all my clients, to feed and give insulin at the same time every 12 hours. Now, whether one waits to see if Fluffy is eating before giving the injection is another story. For folks who have a pet with a hearty appetite that couldn’t imagine missing a meal, they may give the injection as the pet dives into dinner. A feeding frenzy is definitely a distraction to the quick poke of an insulin needle. For folks who have a finicky eater, they might watch to make sure the pet truly eats before giving the injection. Nonetheless, I would feed the pet essentially at the same time as the injection rather than waiting any length of time. The insulin needs something to work with. If food is not given with the insulin the pet could become hypoglycemic. How about the timing of meals? Does it matter if a pet eats in between insulin injections? Yes. Just as giving insulin without food can cause a low blood glucose reading, giving food without insulin will cause an elevated blood glucose test result. If you give a snack in the middle of Continue reading >>

About Fast-acting Mealtime Insulin

About Fast-acting Mealtime Insulin

What is mealtime insulin? Mealtime insulins are fast-acting insulins that are taken immediately before or after meals. As you eat, your blood sugar naturally goes up, or “spikes.” Humalog® (a fast-acting insulin) works to manage those blood sugar spikes and may help keep your sugar levels in balance. Humalog should be taken within 15 minutes before eating or right after eating a meal. People who take Humalog will usually continue to take longer-acting insulin to help manage blood sugar levels at night and between meals. Taking mealtime insulin in addition to longer-acting insulin may help to control blood sugar levels throughout the day. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common side effect of Humalog that may be severe and cause unconsciousness (passing out), seizures, and death. Test your blood sugar levels as your doctor instructs. Talk to your doctor about low blood sugar symptoms and treatment. The orange area shows how blood sugar levels typically rise after meals. The pattern of insulin action may vary in different individuals or within the same individual. Comparing types of insulin Take a look at our overview below to find out about the different types of insulin. You’ll notice that there are differences in when the types of insulin reach your bloodstream, when they “peak” in your body, and how long they can last (length of time the insulin keeps lowering your blood sugar). Fast-acting insulin (also called rapid-acting) is absorbed quickly and starts working in about 15 minutes to lower blood sugar after meals. Humalog fast-acting insulin should be taken 15 minutes before eating or right after eating a meal. Depending on the type of diabetes you have, you may need to take Humalog with a longer-acting insulin or oral anti-diabetes medication. Continue reading >>

Facts About Insulin Treatment

Facts About Insulin Treatment

Insulin is an essential hormone. Without it, the body cannot control or properly use glucose (sugar) – one of its main energy supplying fuels. How does insulin help diabetes? People with type 1 diabetes produce inadequate amounts of insulin, so insulin replacement is their key treatment. Without adequate insulin replacement, people with type 1 diabetes will see their blood sugar levels rise and the body will start to burn up its fat stores. In a few days this leads to a condition called diabetic acidosis, which is life threatening. Too much insulin, on the other hand, leads to such low levels of blood sugar that it causes a condition called hypoglycaemia. The symptoms include paleness, shaking, shivering, perspiration, rapid heartbeat, hunger, anxiety and blurred vision. In some cases it can cause loss of consciousness (hypoglycaemic coma) and convulsions. In type 2 diabetes the problem is not a lack of insulin output, but increasing resistance of your cells to the effects of insulin. In the early years, the body compensates for this insulin resistance by increasing the output of insulin from the pancreas gland. Ultimately, the pancreas becomes unable to cope. About 30 per cent of people with type 2 diabetes eventually need treatment with insulin. The longer a person has type 2 diabetes, the more likely they will have to start insulin treatment at some point. There are four main kinds of injectable insulin. The type of insulin you use will depend on your individual needs and lifestyle. Rapid-acting insulin analogues start working within 10 or 15 minutes and last between 2 to 4 hours. Examples are insulin aspart, insulin aspart and insulin glulisine. Short-acting insulin, eg Actrapid: soluble insulin starts working within 30 to 60 minutes and lasts six to eight hours. Continue reading >>

Do My Dog's Insulin Injections Have To Be Exactly 12 Hours Apart?

Do My Dog's Insulin Injections Have To Be Exactly 12 Hours Apart?

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) In a perfect world, a dog’s insulin injections would be given exactly 12 hours apart, but rarely can an owner do this day in and day out. It is perfectly acceptable to give a dog its insulin injections a little early or late every so often (2 hours or so in either direction). If problems with scheduling are very frequent or result in doses that are routinely given more than two hours late or early, talk to your veterinarian. He or she will probably be able to come up with alternative dosing schedule that will be easier to maintain and result in more consistent blood sugar levels for the dog throughout the day. Keep in mind that is always safer to skip an insulin injection than risk giving two doses too close apart. Related entries: Continue reading >>

Insulin Treatment

Insulin Treatment

Insulin is a hormone made in your pancreas, which lies just behind your stomach. It helps our bodies use glucose for energy. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need to take insulin – either by injection or a pump – to control their blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels). Injecting insulin Insulin is injected using a syringe and needle, or an insulin pen or needle. The needles used are very small as the insulin only needs to be injected under the skin (subcutaneously) – not into a muscle or vein. Once it's been injected, it soaks into small blood vessels and is taken into the bloodstream. As your confidence grows and you become more relaxed, injections will get easier and soon become second nature. The most frequently used injection sites are the thighs, buttocks and abdomen. You may be able to inject into your upper arms, but check with your diabetes team first as this isn't always suitable. As all these areas cover a wide skin area, you should inject at different sites within each of them. It is important to rotate injection sites, as injecting into the same place can cause a build up of lumps under the skin (also known as lipohypertrophy), which make it harder for your body to absorb and use the insulin properly. The three groups of insulin There are three groups of insulin – animal, human (not from humans but produced synthetically to match human insulin) and analogues (the insulin molecule is like a string of beads; scientists have managed to alter the position of some of these beads to create 'analogues' of insulin). Nowadays, most people use human insulin and insulin analogues, although a small number of people still use animal insulin because they have some evidence that they otherwise lose their awareness of Continue reading >>

You Get The Beer, And I'll Get The Lantus

You Get The Beer, And I'll Get The Lantus

The other day, Steph and I were divvying up the shopping that we had to do. I was running low on Lantus, and our refrigerator was also running low on beer, so it was pretty obvious that someone had to get the refills. She also suggested that she would pick up some takeout pizza for supper. And I went to the pharmacy and picked up the insulin. The concept of beer, pizza, and insulin all being part of a tight-control diabetes program might strike some people as unreasonable. But let me assure you that it can work. My tight-control program consists of Novolog given immediately after most meals plus Lantus as basal insulin. Since starting this program a bit over a year ago, I’ve averaged 110 mg/dl on my blood glucose levels, and had normal A1cs, most recently 5.9 You might ask: do I have any restrictions on what I eat? Yup, but they have nothing to do with diabetes. If I eat too much, I’ll gain weight, and like most other people, I have no need to gain any more weight. How can such a program work? 1) Zillions of blood glucose measurements. For example, I always check my BG before driving. To be sure, once in a while, I’ll do only two BGs a day, but if things are exceptional, I have no hesitation to check 6-10 times in a day. 2) Figuring out how much insulin is needed for my routine foods. For me,** 1** slice of pizza takes 4 units of Novolog; 1 bottle of beer is 3 units; 1 English muffin with peanut butter is 3 units. 3) Counting carbs and taking the Novolog after eating. I simply add up the number of units of insulin I’ll need as I go, from salad (no insulin coverage needed) to main course to dessert. Then I pop the total number of units right then and there, using an insulin pen. 4) Injecting through clothing. I discussed this a while back at my other blog, in an Continue reading >>

What To Ask Your Doctor About Insulin

What To Ask Your Doctor About Insulin

Has your doctor prescribed insulin to help manage your type 1 or type 2 diabetes? You’ll want to know how and when to take it, what side effects could happen, and what other changes you may need to make. Use this list of questions as a starting point when you talk with your doctor. What type of insulin do I need? Insulin comes in four basic forms: Rapid-acting insulin starts to work within 30 minutes after injection. Its effects only last for 3 to 5 hours. Regular- or short-acting insulin takes about 30 minutes to work and lasts up to 12 hours. Intermediate-acting insulin takes up to 4 hours to work fully. It peaks anywhere from 4 to 12 hour, and its effects can last for up to 24 hours. Long-acting insulin begins to work in about 4 hours and then lasts up to a full day without a real peak Your doctor can tell you which type will work best with your diabetes type and blood sugar level. How should I give myself insulin? You can inject or inhale it. To inject insulin, you can use a syringe, pen, or pump. There is also a needle-free option called a jet injector. Pens are easiest to use, pumps deliver insulin continuously, and syringes are the least expensive. Find out how many times a day you'll need to inject, and how much insulin to inject in each dose. If you use an insulin pump, ask your doctor when you'll need to give yourself an extra amount of insulin (bolus). If you have type 1 diabetes, you may need up to three or four injections daily. People with type 2 diabetes may need just one shot of insulin a day, possibly increasing to three or four injections. There is also a rapid-acting inhaled insulin that you can use before meals only. If you have type 1 diabetes, you must also use long-acting insulin. Talk with your doctor about the pros and cons of each method. The Continue reading >>

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