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How Long After My Dog Eats Should I Give Him His Insulin

What To Do If Your Diabetic Dog Won't Eat

What To Do If Your Diabetic Dog Won't Eat

A diabetic dog who will not eat is not something to ignore. Many diabetic canines are given insulin shots to control their blood sugar levels, but giving insulin to a dog who has not eaten for some time can be extremely dangerous. It is never advised to give an insulin injection to your pet if he hasn't eaten his food. To learn more about what to do if your diabetic dog won't eat, read on. Insulin Injections and Diabetic Dogs As stated previously, many canines with diabetesare given insulin injections to control blood sugar levels. Insulin injections may be important when treating diabetes in your pet, in combination with the proper diet and exercise . But when a diabetic dog hasn't eaten, however, insulin therapy can be very dangerous. Insulin is a hormone that controls glucose levels in the blood, and giving a dog insulin when he has an empty stomach can cause hypoglycemia very quickly. The dangers of the hypoglycemia would be far worse than the dangers of missing an injection of insulin. Hypoglycemia can rapidly lead to death in dogs, which is why it is advised that pet owners skip an insulin injection if their pet hasn't eaten his meal. How Do I Get My Diabetic Dog to Eat? If your pet is ignoring his food or seems uninterested in it, pet owners should try mixing a small amount of wet canned food into the dry food. They should make sure that each piece of the dry dog food is coated with the wet food. If your pet does eat, you may then give him the insulin injection. If he still does not eat, do not give the injection. Your pet may experience high blood sugar for a very short time, but it will not be enough to cause harm. If your pet continues to have a decrease in appetite and will not eat, immediately consult your veterinarian. Especially in diabetic dogs, the prope Continue reading >>

10 Must-dos When You Have A Diabetic Dog

10 Must-dos When You Have A Diabetic Dog

Diabetic dog? Here are some feeding, exercise and life tips. Is your dog more sluggish than usual? You may have a diabetic dog. The first step toward your dog's good health is a great relationship with your veterinarian. "Having someone you know and trust can make the stress of a chronic and potentially debilitating disease like diabetes much less stressful," says Dr. Denise Petryk, the director of veterinary services at Trupanion. Start with the basics - walking your dog. Your dog should be walked early or late in the day. Walking your pet then avoids the heat of the day, which is especially important for diabetic dogs. "If the dog is not walking in front of you, it's time to come home, as this a sign that the dog is tired. You should go home if your dog is wheezing, panting, limping or otherwise showing signs of exhaustion or discomfort," says Dr. Carol Osborne, an integrative veterinarian and director of the Chagrin Falls Pet Clinic in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. Keep that -- and these 10 tips -- in mind when caring for your diabetic dog. Feed Your Dog Healthy and Low-Fat Meals and Treats There are many types of healthy food available for diabetic dogs. "Commercial brands, whether they are canned or dry, are generally low in fat," says Dr. Osborne. But read the labels and look for low carb and high fiber, according to the American Animal Hospital Association. Bring on the Broccoli Have you considered giving your dog vegetables? "Fresh vegetables make excellent diabetic dog treats," says Dr. Osborne. Some choices dogs love include: broccoli, cauliflower, string beans, and cucumber slices. Veggies can be given to your dog fresh, cooked or frozen. Avoid Overfeeding Just like in humans, dog diabetes is best managed by portion control. Your dog may beg for more, but check with y Continue reading >>

How To Care For A Dog With Diabetes

How To Care For A Dog With Diabetes

How To Care For A Dog With Diabetes Diabetes in dogs is a complex disease caused by either a lack of the hormone insulin or an inadequate response to insulin. After a dog eats, his digestive system breaks food into various components, including glucose-which is carried into his cells by insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas. When a dog does not produce insulin or cannot utilize it normally, his blood sugar levels elevate. The result is hyperglycemia, which, if left untreated, can cause many complicated health problems for a dog. It is important to understand, however, that diabetes is considered a manageable disorder-and many diabetic dogs can lead happy, healthy lives. Why Dogs Get Diabetes Type 1 diabetes, the form of the disease that strikes the young, is actually quite rare in companion animals when they reach middle-age or senior years. Your dog is much more likely to develop Type II (adult-onset) diabetes around middle age or in his senior years, as a result of a lifestyle that has led to decreased production of insulin or the inability of his body to use it efficiently. Obesity is far and away the biggest reason pets become diabetic. You can help your dog stay trim by feeding him a portion controlled, moisture rich species-appropriate diet consisting primarily of a variety of unadulterated protein sources, healthy fats, veggies and fruit in moderation, and specific nutritional supplements as necessary. Your pet has no biological requirement for grains or most other carbs. Carbs, which can be as much as 80 percent the ingredient content of processed pet food, turn into sugar in your pet’s body. Excess sugar in dogs leads to diabetes. Another lifestyle-related reason pets develop diabetes, one that often goes hand-in-hand with poor nutrition, is lack of phy Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Food Should I Feed My Diabetic Dog?

What Kind Of Food Should I Feed My Diabetic Dog?

Controlling the diet of a dog with diabetes mellitus is probably the most important part of treating the disease, with the exception of insulin injections given at periodic intervals. Why Is Controlling the Diet of a Diabetic Dog So Important? Regulating the blood glucose levels (sugar in the blood) is the key to controlling and treating the symptoms of diabetes. Without a properly controlled diet, keeping the blood glucose levels within acceptable limits is impossible. This is because any food that your dog eats has a direct impact on his blood glucose levels and different types or quantities of food will cause differing reactions. What Type of Food Is Best for Dogs with Diabetes Mellitus? The type of food fed to a diabetic dog is much less important than the consistency of the diet. As long as the food is a high-quality diet that is complete and balanced, your diabetic dog will do fine with it. When Should A Dog with Diabetes Be Fed? Ideally, a diabetic dog should be fed twice daily, with each meal given 30-45 minutes prior to his insulin injections, assuming that he receives insulin twice daily. This is because after your dog eats, his blood glucose level will increase. The insulin will work to drive the glucose levels back down and keep them within a normal range. Consistency Is the Key to Feeding a Diabetic Dog Keeping the diet of your diabetic dog consistent is important. Feeding the same quantity of food at the same time each day and not varying the type of food given will help to keep your diabetic dog's blood glucose levels steady and within normal range. Keep Your Diabetic Dog Lean The quantity of food — or more specifically, the number of calories — should be geared toward keeping your dog at a lean body weight, or returning your dog to a lean body weight Continue reading >>

Homemade Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Homemade Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Ruby became sick in August of 2008. He was urinating a lot, had increased water consumption, and looked thinner than normal. He ended up in a veterinary hospital where he was diagnosed with diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, and pancreatitis. Ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening complication for those suffering from diabetes. It occurs due to a lack of insulin which the body responds to by burning fat for fuel and producing ketones. High levels of ketones can poison the body. Simply put, Ruby was quite ill. In an attempt to comfort Ruby, I would crawl into his hospital kennel, hold him, and sing to him. ‘You Are My Sunshine’ was on regular rotation. Perhaps I did less singing and more pleading and praying. Either way, after a week in the hospital I was able to take my sunshine home. It was a challenge to convince Ruby that getting two insulin shots a day was actually a good thing. I had success after following some great advice: use his food as a reward for receiving the shot. I started by putting his full food bowl on the counter while prepping his shot. Like any food-motivated dog, movement of his food bowl commands his attention. But then the approaching needle would make him run away. After he ran away, I would put his food bowl in the cupboard. That movement of his bowl would bring him back again. Round and round we went until he realized the simple equation of food bowl on counter + shot in dog = food bowl on floor + full dog belly. See, Ruby, insulin shots are a great thing! Now he rushes each injection along so he can eat. The hospital sent us home with a few samples of diabetic dog food. I sought advice from Ruby’s vet on both packaged and homemade diabetic dog food. Dr. Old Vet was quite ambivalent and offered little to no opinion or advice. His disinter Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

Diabetes mellitus is a common illness in dogs. It is caused by either a decreased production of insulin or decreased functioning of the insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps glucose move from the blood stream into the cells of the body where it can be used for energy. What causes diabetes in dogs? There appear to be many factors that can contribute to the development of diabetes in dogs. Genetics plays a role. Some diabetes may be immune-mediated. This means the dog's immune system works against the pancreas as it tries to produce insulin. What dogs are most at risk of developing diabetes? Dogs of any age can develop diabetes, but most are between 7 and 9 years old. Females appear to be at increased risk. Certain breeds appear to be more at risk, including Samoyeds, Australian terriers, miniature schnauzers, pugs, and miniature and toy poodles. Dogs who have had multiple episodes of pancreatitis also appear to be more likely to develop diabetes mellitus. What are the signs and symptoms of diabetes in dogs? Most dogs with diabetes will have increased thirst and urination. Although the appetite is usually good or increased, there is often weight loss. Some dogs, however, may become obese. In some cases, blindness due to cataracts may be the first indication to an owner that there is a problem. Cataracts would appear as cloudy eyes with vision loss. Several diseases often occur in conjunction with diabetes mellitus, including Cushing's disease (hyperadrenocorticism), urinary tract infections, hypothyroidism, acute pancreatitis and cancer. The presence of these diseases can complicate the diagnosis and effective treatment of diabetes. Dogs may develop a serious complication of diabetes known as ketoacidosis. In this emergency condition, the blood Continue reading >>

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes is a very serious issue – and not just in people either. That’s right, this chronic and potentially debilitating condition also affects cats (and dogs). And while it’s difficult to know the exact incidence of diabetes in cats, best estimates put it somewhere in the range of 1 cat in every 100-200 cats will become diabetic. What’s even sadder is that this incidence seems to be on the increase. Fortunately, armed with some good information, important tips, and a good working relationship with your veterinarian, you can give your cats the best chance at avoiding this frustrating condition. And if they’ve already developed it, know that these same tools can help you best manage your cat’s diabetic state; avoiding the potential complications and perhaps even getting them into diabetic remission. What is diabetes? In the most basic sense, diabetes mellitus is a disorder where blood sugar, or glucose, cannot be effectively utilized and regulated within the body. There are several hormones within the body that play important roles in glucose metabolism. Insulin is one of the most important, if not the most important, and it’s the hormone most central to the development and control of the diabetic state. Glucose fuels the body and insulin is the hormone that helps to get it into most cells within the body. Diabetes is often easily diagnosed and controllable. However, when undiagnosed or poorly managed, diabetes can be devastating. Diabetes can absolutely be managed and your cat can still lead a long and happy life. Routine veterinary care and evaluation are important, as is achieving and maintaining an appropriate weight in your cat and feeding him an appropriate diet. There are two types of diabetes – Type I and Type II. In Type I diabetes, the pancreas Continue reading >>

My Dog Has Diabetes, So Now What?

My Dog Has Diabetes, So Now What?

*Note* – I’ve updated this article – June 2015 Your life or your dogs life isn’t over with. My Dog, Bender leads a happy, health life. As of right now Bender is 10.5yrs old. He has had diabetes since he was 1.5yrs old. He goes for runs. Plays with his sister Luna, Eats and gets treats. But he also gets shots twice a day and his blood sugar checked regularly. I’ve learned a lot over these last 9 yrs. The key is getting your dog on a schedule with proper food and exercise. Find a high protein, low fat, no filler (corn, white rice), with zero to no added preservatives food. Such as Wellness Core Grain Free Reduced Fat. There are a lot of other foods out there that are similar, find one that works. Stay Away from Hill’s Science Diet W/D. Although your Vet will recommend it, it is terrible for diabetics. First ingredient: Corn = sugar. You will never get your dog regulated on it. Reading my original article. The reason I had so many problems getting Bender regulated was due to Hill’s Science Diet W/D. Cut out table scraps and find some diabetic friendly treats. Managing diabetes can be expensive. But taking short cuts will be worse in the long run. Here are a few tips. Get your dog on a good diabetic dog food. Better food will help regulate your dog and keep insulin needs down. The less insulin the better. If your dog needs more insulin it means there is more sugar in the body and the body is working harder. So good food that doesn’t produce a lot of sugar is a good thing. Get a glucose meter and supplies. Being able to test at home will help cut costs and help keep your dog regulated. My vet would charge me $80 to do a glucose curve. Just once a month for a year is $960. Plus it will never accurate as your dog will be stressed out at the Vet. Not eat right. Continue reading >>

Pomeranians With Diabetes: Story Of A Little Champion – Chip

Pomeranians With Diabetes: Story Of A Little Champion – Chip

I had no idea what the future held on February 16, 2011. My 7 year old Pomeranian, Chip, was diagnosed with Diabetes. I was shocked. I didn’t know dogs could be diabetic. Chip had always been overweight and that contributes to diabetes. No matter how hard I tried, I couldn’t get his weight down. It seemed the harder I tried, the more he gained. Chip was 18 pounds and diabetic… now what? The previous year during his yearly medical exam and blood work we discovered Chip had thyroid issues. It was a simple fix with prescription soloxine and monitoring through blood work. While monitoring his blood work, the Vet discovered Chip had diabetes. I started to notice that the water in the water bowl was disappearing faster than normal but didn’t think much of it. I also noticed there were “accidents” in the house but had difficulty figuring out who was actually responsible because I have another Pomeranian, D.D., a rescue Shepherd mix, Rhett, and a cat, Chloe. The diabetes diagnosis explains it, it was Chip, excessive urination and drinking are classic signs of diabetes. It seemed simple enough to fix… I guess – consistent feeding and insulin shots twice daily 12 hours apart. But I felt so intimated, so afraid. What if I hurt Chip? What if I gave him too much insulin? I could do it, I had to do it — for Chip. The vet’s office had me practice my shots and then sent me home… still basically an amateur shot giver. Whew, it was scary. My fear subsided when I felt I got the hang of it and it actually went pretty well. We had to run weekly blood curves which is a blood sampling which is administered like this: 1.) Just prior to insulin administration 2.) Then, in at least 60 to 120 minute intervals 3.) Over a period of 12 hours, ideally for 24 hrs This was done un Continue reading >>

Regulation

Regulation

When your pet is first diagnosed with diabetes, your goal is to "regulate" the pet's blood glucose, which may take a few weeks. This process is basically the same as in type-1 diabetic humans. The goal is to adjust diet and insulin dose to keep the blood glucose values in a comfortable range for the pet during the whole day, or most of it. Regulated cats or dogs can "slip out" of regulation at any time because the body is not a static system. Regulation is best done with home blood sugar testing and a species-appropriate diet. The well-regulated diabetic pet should look and act the same as he/she did before diabetes, or like any other non-diabetic pet[1]. For cats, more and more vets are turning to a Low-carb diet to keep the cat's blood sugar levels as constant as possible and allow regulation with a single slow-acting insulin such as PZI, Levemir or Lantus. In this case, the effect on blood sugar of mealtimes is minimal. Dogs may in some cases have their mealtimes strictly scheduled and planned to match with injection times. Cats on faster-acting insulins such as Vetsulin, Caninsulin, Humulin N, or Lente may also benefit from scheduled meals. Free-feeding can work if the amount of food is measured and kept consistent[2]. Consult your veterinarian. For dogs, the most common protocol is feeding and giving insulin injections 12 hours apart, with an Intermediate-acting insulin[3][4]. Meals should be timed so that the maximum effect of the injected insulin occurs after it's been eaten, or post-prandially[5]. Since the insulin regimen for most dogs is of a fixed pattern, having a predictable glycemic response should be achieved each time. This means that each meal should be comprised of roughly the same ingredients and caloric content and fed at the same times each day. If Continue reading >>

Mercy Animal Hospital

Mercy Animal Hospital

INFORMATIONAL TIDBITS The Itchy Dog Nutrition Pet Insurance On Fleas and Ticks Distemper Lyme Treatment Diabetic Management in Pets Diabetic Management in Pets Diabetic Management of the Dog Diabetes is a condition in which the patient is not producing enough insulin to meet their needs. The role of insulin is to allow the transport of glucose, (or sugar, the two terms are interchangeable,) from the bloodstream into the cells. Thus, if the dog does not produce enough insulin then the glucose builds up in the bloodstream to dangerous levels. Unlike people and cats, dogs very rarely get Type 2 diabetes, which can be managed by diet and weight control, thus dogs almost always need to take insulin. So the dog needs insulin, we give it insulin, just as if you had an underactive thyroid and needed thyroid medication. In theory all very simple. However, there is a major complication with diabetes as opposed to other hormone supplementation- there is a very narrow window of effective dosage. Thus, if a dog needs 10 units of insulin 7 units will not do him any good at all, and 10 will lower his blood glucose to where he goes into a coma. So diabetic control is all about 'finding the number'. It is important to 'find the number' as quickly as it is reasonable to do so. If a dog's blood glucose is too low, from too much insulin, they can go into a coma. HAVING A BLOOD GLUCOSE WHICH IS TOO HIGH FROM TOO LITTLE INSULIN IS MUCH LESS DANGEROUS THAN HAVING A LOW BLOOD GLUCOSE FROM GIVING TOO MUCH. We must be careful to avoid that one day when too much insulin is given, so we must be patient when finding the number. However, if it remains too high, then they will go into a condition called 'keto-acidosis', an acute shock reaction of extreme dehydration, which can rapidly be fatal. In ad Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Illustration of a dog's pancreas. Cell-islet in the illustration refers to a pancreatic cell in the Islets of Langerhans, which contain insulin-producing beta cells and other endocrine related cells. Permanent damage to these beta cells results in Type 1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, for which exogenous insulin replacement therapy is the only answer. Diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas either stop producing insulin or can no longer produce it in enough quantity for the body's needs. The condition is commonly divided into two types, depending on the origin of the condition: Type 1 diabetes, sometimes called "juvenile diabetes", is caused by destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas. The condition is also referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes, meaning exogenous insulin injections must replace the insulin the pancreas is no longer capable of producing for the body's needs. Dogs can have insulin-dependent, or Type 1, diabetes; research finds no Type 2 diabetes in dogs.[1][2][3] Because of this, there is no possibility the permanently damaged pancreatic beta cells could re-activate to engender a remission as may be possible with some feline diabetes cases, where the primary type of diabetes is Type 2.[2][4][5] There is another less common form of diabetes, diabetes insipidus, which is a condition of insufficient antidiuretic hormone or resistance to it.[6][7] This most common form of diabetes affects approximately 0.34% of dogs.[8] The condition is treatable and need not shorten the animal's life span or interfere with quality of life.[9] If left untreated, the condition can lead to cataracts, increasing weakness in the legs (neuropathy), malnutrition, ketoacidosis, dehydration, and death.[10] Diabetes mainly affects mid Continue reading >>

Getting Started

Getting Started

To start, I want to say, stop, take a deep breath. Now, let me say, canine diabetes is not usually a death sentence for a dog. In most cases, diabetic dogs will live a full and healthy life with proper management. My dog, Bender, was diagnosed with Diabetes back in 2007. You would never know he is diabetic. What is Canine Diabetes? Diabetes mellitus is a condition that affects the concentration of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Diabetes is the result of when a dog’s body makes too little insulin or doesn’t process insulin properly. When a dog eats, their digestive system breaks food down into various components, including glucose. The glucose is carried into the dog’s cells by insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas. When a dog does not produce insulin, does not produce enough insulin, or cannot utilize it normally, their blood sugar levels elevate. The result is hyperglycemia, an excess of glucose in the bloodstream. Without insulin, glucose stays in the bloodstream. Prolonged, elevated levels of glucose will cause damage to the organs, eventually leading to death. Is Canine Diabetes Treatable? At this point there is no cure for canine diabetes. Insulin must be provided through an injection after every meal. The good news is canine diabetes is manageable. How to Manage Canine Diabetes? The key to successful diabetes management is quality food, exercise and to get on a schedule that works for you and your dog. Although it is recommend to feed and give a shot afterwards every twelve hours. Some times life just doesn’t work that way. For example I feed Bender at 8:00am, shot right after, we go for a 3-4 mile run at 5:00pm. Then dinner at 6:00-6:30pm. This schedule works for us. You might find that you need to go for a walk at 6:00am, food and shot at 7:00am. Th Continue reading >>

How To Care For A Diabetic Dog

How To Care For A Diabetic Dog

Expert Reviewed Humans are not the only mammal that can get diabetes. Dogs can develop diabetes, especially later in life. If your dog has diabetes, there are many ways you can care for your dog. Make sure to medicate your dog with insulin correctly. Make changes to your dog's lifestyle to promote its health. Deal with the complications of a diabetic dog. You will have to be extra careful about managing things like vacations. 1 Make a plan for your dog's health with your vet. Diabetes requires swift treatment, but the treatment plan depends on your dog's current health. Insulin is usually required, and the vet will determine the amount. You also may have to make certain lifestyle changes. A long talk with a veterinarian is the first step [1] A simple test can diagnose diabetes in your dog. Your vet can also do blood tests to see how diabetes is affecting your dog's body. The sooner you begin treatment, the better. Your dog's health will suffer as long as diabetes goes untreated. Make sure to ask your vet any questions you have. Treating diabetes can be tricky, so you want to leave the office with a clear treatment plan in mind. If the vet has any pamphlets you can take home, take them with you. 2 Draw insulin correctly. You will have to give your dog insulin injections regularly. Make sure you know how to draw insulin safely. You will need a syringe to do so. Prior to injecting your dog, carefully draw out the correct amount of insulin.[2] First, remove the cap from the needle. Then, you will pull back the plunger of the needle until you reach the appropriate dose. Stick the needle in the spongy top of the bottle of insulin. Push down on the plunger, pushing air into the bottle. This will create a vacuum that allows you to more easily draw insulin from the bottle. Pull Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Dogs can have diabetes just like humans - both Type 1 and Type 2. Diabetic dogs are increasingly common, but the disease is entirely manageable unless left untreated. MY DOG HAS DIABETES: OVERVIEW 1. If your dog shows symptoms of diabetes (described below), seek veterinary care at once. 2. Work with your vet to determine the right type of insulin and the right dose for your individual dog. 3. Take your dog for frequent veterinary checkups. 4. Learn how to give insulin injections and reward your dog for accepting them. 5. Consistently feed your diabetic dog the same type of food at the same time of day. 6. Report any unusual symptoms or reactions to your vet. For years public health officials have reported a diabetes epidemic among America’s children and adults. At the same time, the rate of canine diabetes in America has more than tripled since 1970, so that today it affects about 1 in every 160 dogs. But while many human cases are caused and can be treated by diet, for dogs, diabetes is a lifelong condition that requires careful blood sugar monitoring and daily insulin injections. The medical term for the illness is diabetes mellitus (mellitus is a Latin term that means “honey sweet,” reflecting the elevated sugar levels the condition produces in urine and blood). Diabetes occurs when the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin to metabolize food for energy, or when the body’s cells fail to utilize insulin properly. The pancreas’s inability to produce insulin is known in humans as type 1 (formerly called juvenile or insulin-dependent) diabetes. This is analogous to the type that affects virtually all dogs. Dogs can also develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Type 2 (formerly adult onset) diabetes, which is the result of insulin resistance often l Continue reading >>

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