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How Long After Eating Can I Give My Dog Insulin

How To Give Insulin To A Dog

How To Give Insulin To A Dog

Dogs with diabetes aren't able to make enough insulin, a hormone that allows the body to store energy from food and move glucose into cells. Because this condition has serious and potentially fatal consequences, diabetic dogs are typically treated with insulin injections one or two times each day. Because insulin is not a sturdy substance, it is important to handle it gently and avoid exposing it to extreme temperatures or excessive motion. Store unopened bottles of insulin in your refrigerator. After they have been opened, it is still advisable to keep insulin in the fridge. It can tolerate short periods of time at room temperature in an area where it’s out of direct sunlight. Before attempting to give your dog insulin, it is wise to practice loading the syringe with the appropriate amount of sterile water or saline. You can even use an apple or orange to practice giving insulin injections until you feel you are ready to try it on your dog. Because there are many different kinds of dog insulin syringes, make sure you buy the size and type recommended by your veterinarian. Always use a new syringe and needle every time you give your dog an insulin injection. This will guarantee that your supplies are sterile and minimize risk of infection. Unwrap the syringe and needle, but leave the needle itself capped until you are prepared to load the syringe with insulin. Carefully roll the bottle of insulin in your hands to make sure the hormone is well mixed. Do not shake it. Remove the needle cap. Then, use the pointer finger and thumb of one hand to hold the insulin syringe while drawing back on the plunger with the other hand. Continue to pull back, filling the plunger with air, until you reach the correct marker for the amount of insulin your dog will need. Hold the bottle Continue reading >>

Regulation

Regulation

When your pet is first diagnosed with diabetes, your goal is to "regulate" the pet's blood glucose, which may take a few weeks. This process is basically the same as in type-1 diabetic humans. The goal is to adjust diet and insulin dose to keep the blood glucose values in a comfortable range for the pet during the whole day, or most of it. Regulated cats or dogs can "slip out" of regulation at any time because the body is not a static system. Regulation is best done with home blood sugar testing and a species-appropriate diet. The well-regulated diabetic pet should look and act the same as he/she did before diabetes, or like any other non-diabetic pet[1]. For cats, more and more vets are turning to a Low-carb diet to keep the cat's blood sugar levels as constant as possible and allow regulation with a single slow-acting insulin such as PZI, Levemir or Lantus. In this case, the effect on blood sugar of mealtimes is minimal. Dogs may in some cases have their mealtimes strictly scheduled and planned to match with injection times. Cats on faster-acting insulins such as Vetsulin, Caninsulin, Humulin N, or Lente may also benefit from scheduled meals. Free-feeding can work if the amount of food is measured and kept consistent[2]. Consult your veterinarian. For dogs, the most common protocol is feeding and giving insulin injections 12 hours apart, with an Intermediate-acting insulin[3][4]. Meals should be timed so that the maximum effect of the injected insulin occurs after it's been eaten, or post-prandially[5]. Since the insulin regimen for most dogs is of a fixed pattern, having a predictable glycemic response should be achieved each time. This means that each meal should be comprised of roughly the same ingredients and caloric content and fed at the same times each day. If Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog Threw Up All Food After Insulin Injection. Tested Glucose And Number Was 507. What Do I Do?

Diabetic Dog Threw Up All Food After Insulin Injection. Tested Glucose And Number Was 507. What Do I Do?

My dog is diabetic but she threw up all her food after her insulin injection. I do not want her to go into shock but she won't eat. Help please. Try tempting her with some chicken and if you have anyway if checking her blood glucose levels at home then do that. Otherwise monitor her and any signs of lethargy contact your emergency vet. When... 4 People found this answer helpful Mister PJ needs to go to a veterinary emergency clinic right away. You don't want to mess around with insulin doses at home because it can cause very confusing results and Mister PJ's blood glucose... When should I be doing blood glucose readings on my diabetic cat (what times during the day, before/after insulin)? Hi, thanks for using Petcoach!I think this is Veterinarian preference. If your Vet wants you to be doing this at home, double check with them on what time they want you to check Nappy's blood sugar... 1 Person found this answer helpful That is a high glucose reading, but unfortunately I cannot advise you if Kaiya needs more insulin or not. It's illegal for me to recommend giving her more insulin or not without seeing her in... Blood sugar levels can widely fluctuate due to changes in activity and stress. Continue to monitor your dogs BG and call your veterinarian if it remains high. Diabetes cat i give him insulin 0.3 and a wet food after 4 hours i check his glucose and it was low 43 i feed it dry food when i should test him again In about one hour, keep offering food in the meantime. Do not give the next dosage of insulin and contact your veterinarian to adjust it. The dosage may be too high and diabetes could even be in... 1 Person found this answer helpful Well controlled Elderly diabetic cat excessive drinking last 3 months. Kidney function, fructosamine and glucose curve all teste Continue reading >>

Timing Meals With Injections

Timing Meals With Injections

Pages 77 - 79 To review, unlike diabetes in humans, it is uncommon for dog diabetes to be well-controlled by simply adjusting the diet. Diet does, however, still play an important role in the dog's care. Chapter 7 described the importance of including high quality, species-appropriate ingredients in the diet. It also discussed the concept of how consistency from meal to meal can be achieved and how this will help regulate a dog's insulin dosage and glucose levels. We will discuss the spacing of meals in this chapter, as it is closely related to insulin activity. Depending on the type of food, blood sugar begins to rise 1 to 2 hours after a meal is ingested. Diabetic dogs typically do best when they are fed 2, 3, or 4 small meals each day. These dogs maintain more consistent blood sugar levels than those dogs fed only once a day. Severe highs and lows in glucose can be dangerous for your dog. Occasionally, a dog that is a finicky eater may have developed the habit of free-feeding, or nibbling all day long. In most cases it is better to permit this schedule. The goal in feeding is to ensure that the dog has food in his system when the insulin activity peaks. Dogs receiving two daily insulin injections at 12-hour intervals should also receive two meals at about 12-hour intervals. Dogs receiving only a single insulin injection should receive a main meal prior to that injection, but they too, will benefit from several more meals spaced throughout the day. Meals should be offered about 15 minutes to the insulin injection. This is a slight departure from the routine followed by human diabetics, but for good reason. Dogs with diabetes often suffer from other digestive complaints. They vomit more readily than do humans. Feeding the meal prior to injection helps ensure that gluco Continue reading >>

Do My Dog's Insulin Injections Have To Be Exactly 12 Hours Apart?

Do My Dog's Insulin Injections Have To Be Exactly 12 Hours Apart?

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) In a perfect world, a dog’s insulin injections would be given exactly 12 hours apart, but rarely can an owner do this day in and day out. It is perfectly acceptable to give a dog its insulin injections a little early or late every so often (2 hours or so in either direction). If problems with scheduling are very frequent or result in doses that are routinely given more than two hours late or early, talk to your veterinarian. He or she will probably be able to come up with alternative dosing schedule that will be easier to maintain and result in more consistent blood sugar levels for the dog throughout the day. Keep in mind that is always safer to skip an insulin injection than risk giving two doses too close apart. Related entries: Continue reading >>

Handling A Diabetes Emergency

Handling A Diabetes Emergency

Emergencies can happen at any time, so it's best to be prepared and know what to do if an emergency occurs. Talking with your veterinarian is a crucial part of being informed and prepared to handle emergencies. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) The most common side effect experienced with insulin therapy is hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can be caused by: Missing or delaying food. Change in food, diet, or amount fed. Infection or illness. Change in the body's need for insulin. Diseases of the adrenal, pituitary, or thyroid glands, or progression of liver or kidney disease. Interaction with other drugs (such as steroids). Change (increase) in exercise. Signs of hypoglycemia may occur suddenly and can include: Weakness Depression Behavioral changes Muscle twitching Anxiety Seizures Coma Death See below for a list of other side effects. What to do If your pet is conscious, rub a tablespoon of corn syrup on his or her gums. When your pet is able to swallow, feed him or her a usual meal and contact your veterinarian. If your pet is unconscious or having a seizure, this is a medical emergency. CONTACT YOUR VETERINARIAN. In the meantime, you should immediately treat your pet rather than delaying management. Pour a small amount of a sugar solution (eg, corn syrup) onto your finger and then rub the sugar solution onto your pet's gums. The sugar is absorbed very quickly and your pet should respond in 1 to 2 minutes. The sugar solution should never be poured directly into your pet's mouth since there is a risk that the solution will be inhaled into the lungs. Once your pet has responded to the sugar administration and is sitting up, it can be fed a small amount of its regular food. Once the pet has stabilized, it should be transported to your veterinarian for evaluation. Your pet's diet Continue reading >>

Feeding Schedule For Diabetic Dogs

Feeding Schedule For Diabetic Dogs

Go to site For Pet Owners Good glycemic control is dependent upon a controlled and consistent dietary intake. It is important to achieve and then maintain a normal body weight, because this is a strong indicator of good diabetic control. The dietary requirements of a diabetic dog are highly variable—diet must be individually tailored for each dog. Body weight is a major factor in diet selections. Obese dogs require reduced caloric intake, either through feeding a calorie-restricted diet or by feeding a reduced quantity of the normal diet. Increasing physical activity will also be beneficial in obese dogs. Conversely, underweight dogs may require calorie-rich diets such as pediatric or convalescent diets. Another important consideration is the presence of concurrent disease, for example, renal failure or pancreatitis. It may be that the dietary management for these associated problems is more critical than a specific "diabetic" diet. Dogs tend to gobble their food. Traditionally, the dog’s daily food intake should be divided into 2 meals. The first meal is given around the time of the morning insulin injection, and the second meal is given approximately 7.5 hours (6 to 10 hours) later, at the time of peak insulin activity. Fiber-rich diets have been shown to slow the postprandial glucose surge in dogs, which consequently improves glycemic control. Timing of meals Meals should be timed so that the absorption of glucose from the gastrointestinal tract coincides with the peak action of the administered insulin. This will minimize fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations and thus episodes of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. 1. Dogs administered insulin once daily The first meal (eg, 2/3 of the daily ration) is given prior to the morning insulin injection. This allows Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment In Dogs

By Ernest Ward, DVM & Robin Downing, DVM, DAAPM, DACVSMR, CVPP Emergency Situations, Medical Conditions This handout provides detailed information on insulin administration. For more information about diabetes mellitus, see the fact sheets "Diabetes Mellitus - General Information", and "Diabetes Mellitus - Principles of Treatment". What is diabetes mellitus? In dogs, diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar. This is Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (also called Type 1 Diabetes). This type of diabetes usually results from destruction of most or all of the beta-cells that produce insulin in the pancreas. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar levels. What do I need to know about insulin treatment for diabetes mellitus? In diabetic dogs, the main treatment for regulating blood glucose is giving insulin by injection. Dogs with diabetes mellitus typically require two daily insulin injections as well as a dietary change. Although the dog can go a day or so without insulin and not have a crisis, this should not be a regular occurrence; treatment should be looked upon as part of the dog's daily routine. This means that you, as the dog's owner, must make both a financial commitment and a personal commitment to treat your dog. If are out of town or go on vacation, your dog must receive proper treatment in your absence. Initially, your dog may be hospitalized for a few days to deal with any immediate crisis and to begin the insulin regulation process. For instance, if your dog is so sick that he has quit eating and drinking for several days, he may be experiencing “diabetic ketoacidosis,” which may require a several days of intensive care. On Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Food Should I Feed My Diabetic Dog?

What Kind Of Food Should I Feed My Diabetic Dog?

Controlling the diet of a dog with diabetes mellitus is probably the most important part of treating the disease, with the exception of insulin injections given at periodic intervals. Why Is Controlling the Diet of a Diabetic Dog So Important? Regulating the blood glucose levels (sugar in the blood) is the key to controlling and treating the symptoms of diabetes. Without a properly controlled diet, keeping the blood glucose levels within acceptable limits is impossible. This is because any food that your dog eats has a direct impact on his blood glucose levels and different types or quantities of food will cause differing reactions. What Type of Food Is Best for Dogs with Diabetes Mellitus? The type of food fed to a diabetic dog is much less important than the consistency of the diet. As long as the food is a high-quality diet that is complete and balanced, your diabetic dog will do fine with it. When Should A Dog with Diabetes Be Fed? Ideally, a diabetic dog should be fed twice daily, with each meal given 30-45 minutes prior to his insulin injections, assuming that he receives insulin twice daily. This is because after your dog eats, his blood glucose level will increase. The insulin will work to drive the glucose levels back down and keep them within a normal range. Consistency Is the Key to Feeding a Diabetic Dog Keeping the diet of your diabetic dog consistent is important. Feeding the same quantity of food at the same time each day and not varying the type of food given will help to keep your diabetic dog's blood glucose levels steady and within normal range. Keep Your Diabetic Dog Lean The quantity of food — or more specifically, the number of calories — should be geared toward keeping your dog at a lean body weight, or returning your dog to a lean body weight Continue reading >>

Guidelines For Insulin Shots For Diabetic Pets

Guidelines For Insulin Shots For Diabetic Pets

I can’t think of a disease that causes more owner anxiety than diabetes. Something about having to give a shot twice a day, every day, to an animal you love is very daunting. Then you do it a couple times and suddenly, it’s a breeze! I’ll try to help you get “breezy” fast! I’ll also answer the common question of “how far apart can I give the insulin?” Insulin is kept in the refrigerator. Some pens made for humans can be left out for periods of time, but for the most part, plan on refrigerating the insulin. If you have a decent drive to the pharmacy or vet office, bring a little cooler to bring the insulin home. It needs to be gently mixed before each dose. Vetsulin, an insulin made specifically for dogs and cats, can be shaken like a polaroid picture. Other insulins need to be gently inverted in a rocking motion, not shaken like orange juice. Your veterinarian will show you how to give shots, and make sure you get some practice with saline solution! Here’s some pointers (hoping to have a video soon!): We generally aim for the back, between the shoulder, but insulin can be given under the skin anywhere! Try not to hit the exact same place over and over. Some owners move it in a little circle on the back, some do a 4-corners approach. Do what works for you. You basically want a spot that has skin you can easily pinch. Pinch the skin with your thumb and middle finger. That leaves your index finger free. If you’re right handed, do this with your left hand. Feel the “tent” of skin that forms from your pinching. That’s where the shot goes. After drawing up the insulin and getting the bubbles out, hold the syringe with your thumb and middle finger, leaving your index finger free to depress the plunger. Insert the needle completely into the skin. You c Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Drug Name: Insulin Common Name: Vetsulin®, Humulin®, PZI Vet®, Novolin®, Iletin®, Velosulin® Drug Type: Synthetic hormone Used For: Diabetes mellitus Species: Dogs, Cats Administered: 40units/ml, 100units/ml, and 500units/ml Injectable How Dispensed: Prescription only FDA Approved: Yes General Description Insulin is used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps convert your pet’s food into energy by allowing the uptake of sugar by cells. By allowing this uptake and use of sugar, insulin decreases the blood glucose concentrations in the body. When you pet does not produce insulin, sugar can’t enter cells, your pet’s body cannot create fat, sugar, or protein. This also results in a dangerously high blood glucose level. How It Works Insulin replaces the insulin that your pet’s body does not produce. The type of insulin you give to your pet is a synthetic hormone derived from pigs or cows. Storage Information Some forms of insulin need to be refrigerated, pay close attention to the manufacturer’s label. DO NOT FREEZE. Protect from heat and sunlight. Do not use if past the expiration date. Insulin must be given to your pet by an injection 1 to 2 times a day. Because it is a protein, the acids in the stomach would digest it if you were to administer it orally. The proper dose of insulin is determined by your veterinarian through a series of glucose level tests. It is best to give this drug to a pet with a full stomach. It is best to give insulin right after a meal. DO NOT SHAKE THE BOTTLE OF INSULIN Proper handling of insulin: Be sure you have the appropriate size syringe for the concentration of insulin you are using. Variations include: U-40, U-100, and U-500 syringes which go to their c Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Dogs can have diabetes just like humans - both Type 1 and Type 2. Diabetic dogs are increasingly common, but the disease is entirely manageable unless left untreated. MY DOG HAS DIABETES: OVERVIEW 1. If your dog shows symptoms of diabetes (described below), seek veterinary care at once. 2. Work with your vet to determine the right type of insulin and the right dose for your individual dog. 3. Take your dog for frequent veterinary checkups. 4. Learn how to give insulin injections and reward your dog for accepting them. 5. Consistently feed your diabetic dog the same type of food at the same time of day. 6. Report any unusual symptoms or reactions to your vet. For years public health officials have reported a diabetes epidemic among America’s children and adults. At the same time, the rate of canine diabetes in America has more than tripled since 1970, so that today it affects about 1 in every 160 dogs. But while many human cases are caused and can be treated by diet, for dogs, diabetes is a lifelong condition that requires careful blood sugar monitoring and daily insulin injections. The medical term for the illness is diabetes mellitus (mellitus is a Latin term that means “honey sweet,” reflecting the elevated sugar levels the condition produces in urine and blood). Diabetes occurs when the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin to metabolize food for energy, or when the body’s cells fail to utilize insulin properly. The pancreas’s inability to produce insulin is known in humans as type 1 (formerly called juvenile or insulin-dependent) diabetes. This is analogous to the type that affects virtually all dogs. Dogs can also develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Type 2 (formerly adult onset) diabetes, which is the result of insulin resistance often l Continue reading >>

Animal Medical Clinic On Georgia

Animal Medical Clinic On Georgia

Canine diabetes Diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes) is a disease of the pancreas. This is a small but vital organ that is located near the stomach. It has two significant populations of cells. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta-cells, produces the hormone called insulin. Diabetes is a failure of the pancreas to produce adequate insulin, or a failure of the body cells to respond to insulin. In humans, two types of diabetes mellitus have been discovered. Both types are similar in that there is a failure to regulate blood sugar, but the basic mechanisms of disease differ somewhat between the two groups. Type I, or Insulin Dependent Diabetes, results from total or near-complete destruction of the beta-cells. This is the only type of diabetes known in dogs. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar. Type II, or Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, is different because some insulin-producing cells remain. However, the amount produced is insufficient, there is a delayed response in secreting it, and the tissues of the dog's body are relatively resistant to it. People with this form may be treated with an oral drug that stimulates the remaining cells to produce insulin in an adequate amount to normalize blood sugar. Because Type II diabetes does not occur in dogs, oral medications are not appropriate for treating diabetic dogs. Why is insulin so important? Glucose is a small sugar produced by metabolism of carbohydrates and proteins. Glucose is the main source of energy used by our body cells. Insulin is a protein messenger, or hormone, that acts like a gatekeeper. It stands at the surface of body cells and opens the door, allowing glucose to leave Continue reading >>

What To Do If Your Diabetic Dog Won't Eat

What To Do If Your Diabetic Dog Won't Eat

A diabetic dog who will not eat is not something to ignore. Many diabetic canines are given insulin shots to control their blood sugar levels, but giving insulin to a dog who has not eaten for some time can be extremely dangerous. It is never advised to give an insulin injection to your pet if he hasn't eaten his food. To learn more about what to do if your diabetic dog won't eat, read on. Insulin Injections and Diabetic Dogs As stated previously, many canines with diabetesare given insulin injections to control blood sugar levels. Insulin injections may be important when treating diabetes in your pet, in combination with the proper diet and exercise . But when a diabetic dog hasn't eaten, however, insulin therapy can be very dangerous. Insulin is a hormone that controls glucose levels in the blood, and giving a dog insulin when he has an empty stomach can cause hypoglycemia very quickly. The dangers of the hypoglycemia would be far worse than the dangers of missing an injection of insulin. Hypoglycemia can rapidly lead to death in dogs, which is why it is advised that pet owners skip an insulin injection if their pet hasn't eaten his meal. How Do I Get My Diabetic Dog to Eat? If your pet is ignoring his food or seems uninterested in it, pet owners should try mixing a small amount of wet canned food into the dry food. They should make sure that each piece of the dry dog food is coated with the wet food. If your pet does eat, you may then give him the insulin injection. If he still does not eat, do not give the injection. Your pet may experience high blood sugar for a very short time, but it will not be enough to cause harm. If your pet continues to have a decrease in appetite and will not eat, immediately consult your veterinarian. Especially in diabetic dogs, the prope Continue reading >>

How Long After The Dog Eats Can I Give Insulin

How Long After The Dog Eats Can I Give Insulin

Skip it and for future reference as well: if you accidentally miss a dose, relax, and just pick up again at next schedule time after eating. While it is always best to never miss a dose, that would be unreasonable to think we all don't miss it from time to time (I've had a few myself, having a diabetic cat in my household). It happens to us all. But you don't want to give it at an odd time, throwing off the schedule and possibly causing hypoglycemic reactions too. Just don't worry, that dose was skipped, and pick up again in the morning after his breakfast. Better to let the sugar be high for the night than too low and more dangerous. Best of luck. Let me know if I can help further with anything, Christine Continue reading >>

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