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How Is Glucose Produced In Photosynthesis

Photosynthetic Cells

Photosynthetic Cells

Cells get nutrients from their environment, but where do those nutrients come from? Virtually all organic material on Earth has been produced by cells that convert energy from the Sun into energy-containing macromolecules. This process, called photosynthesis, is essential to the global carbon cycle and organisms that conduct photosynthesis represent the lowest level in most food chains (Figure 1). Plants exist in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. (A) Coleochaete orbicularis (Charophyceae) gametophyte; magnification x 75 (photograph courtesy of L. E. Graham). (B) Chara (Charophyceae) gametophyte; magnification x 1.5 (photograph courtesy of M. Feist). (C) Riccia (liverwort) gametophyte showing sporangia (black) embedded in the thallus; magnification x 5 (photograph courtesy of A. N. Drinnan). (D) Anthoceros (hornwort) gametophyte showing unbranched sporophytes; magnification x 2.5 (photograph courtesy of A. N. Drinnan). (E) Mnium (moss) gametophyte showing unbranched sporophytes with terminal sporangia (capsule); magnification x 4.5 (photograph courtesy of W. Burger). (F) Huperzia (clubmoss) sporophyte with leaves showing sessile yellow sporangia; magnification x 0.8. (G) Dicranopteris (fern) sporophyte showing leaves with circinate vernation; magnification x 0.08. (H) Psilotum (whisk fern) sporophyte with reduced leaves and spherical synangia (three fused sporangia); magnification x 0.4. (I) Equisetum (horsetail) sporophyte with whorled branches, reduced leaves, and a terminal cone; magnification x 0.4. (J) Cycas (seed plant) sporophyte showing leaves and terminal cone with seeds; magnification x 0.05 (photograph courtesy of W. Burger). Figure Detail Most living things depend on photosynthetic cells to manufacture the complex organic molecules they require as a source Continue reading >>

Howis Sugar Made By Photosynthesis In A Plant Cell?describe The Process Of Photosynthesis And Its Outcomes.

Howis Sugar Made By Photosynthesis In A Plant Cell?describe The Process Of Photosynthesis And Its Outcomes.

Howis sugar made by photosynthesis in a plant cell?Describe the process of photosynthesis and its outcomes. Let's look at this one from the most basic perspective possible: Leaves make chlorophyll, which in turn produces cellulose. The way they make chlorophyll is through the process of photosynthesis -- sunlight becoming food for plants. A simple way to think about it is this: Sunlight strikes plants, leaves ingest carbon dioxide and give off oxygen, and water is absorbed into the leaves, roots, or cells themselves. During this process, sugar is created as a... Let's look at this one from the most basic perspective possible: Leaves make chlorophyll, which in turn produces cellulose. The way they make chlorophyll is through the process of photosynthesis -- sunlight becoming food for plants. A simple way to think about it is this: Sunlight strikes plants, leaves ingest carbon dioxide and give off oxygen, and water is absorbed into the leaves, roots, or cells themselves. During this process, sugar is created as a byproduct of the photosynthesis. In a plant, the leaves have pigments (chlorophyll) that absorb light and have openings to let CO2 through called stroma. Photosynthesis is the process that plant use to trap the suns energy to build glucose as food. It happens in the chloroplast. It happens in two stages: the light dependent reaction (happens in the thylakoid membrane of the chloroplast) and the Calvin cycle (happens in the stroma) The equation for photosynthesis is: C02 + H20 -> C6H12O6 + 02 The light dependent reaction produced ATP and NADPH, energies that are needed to produce glucose (sugar) The light dependent reaction has these steps: 1. The light hits the chlorophyll in the thylakoid membrane, which excites electrons and releases enzymes that split H20 int Continue reading >>

Ib Bio Study Guide Flashcards | Quizlet

Ib Bio Study Guide Flashcards | Quizlet

The production of carbon compounds in cells using light energy state the word equation of photosynthesis Water and Carbon Dioxide in the presence of light produces glucose and oxygen State the symbol equation of photosynthesis State the two main uses of the glucose produced in photosynthesis state the word that is used to describe reactions and processes that consume energy With reference to the products of photosynthesis outline why the process of photosynthesis consumes energy Photosynthesis uses light energy, water and CO2 to create glucose and O2. Glucose and O2 are necessary for cellular respiration State the source of energy used in the process of photosynthesis State the name of the water splitting process State the waste product of photosynthesis and why it's considered a waste product Oxygen, because it is not recycled back into the plant for the next cycle of photosynthesis state the name of the main photosynthetic pigment State the location of the main photosynthetic pigment shows the rate of photosynthesis for all the wavelengths of light as a percent of the maximum possible rate shows the absorption of pigments such as chlorophyll for all the wavelengths of light Explain why the leaves of most plants appear as green to us Chlorophyll pigment reflects green light from the sun A. The plant will be respiring only, not photosynthesizing (night) B. As the light increases then the rate of photosynthesis increases C. At high light intensities the rate becomes constant, even with further increases in light intensity there are increases in the rate A. Increasing rate go photosynthesis as the kinetic energy of reactants increases B. Maximum rate of reaction of photosynthesis at the "optimum" temp. C. Decrease in rate of photosynthesis as the enzymes denature and bec Continue reading >>

Bbc - Standard Grade Bitesize Biology - Making Food : Revision, Page 4

Bbc - Standard Grade Bitesize Biology - Making Food : Revision, Page 4

Green plants make food in the form of carbohydrates by combining carbon dioxide and water using energy from sunlight. Carbohydrates are chemicals containing only the elements carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. The simplest useful form of carbohydrate produced by photosynthesis is glucose sugar. Glucose may be used as an energy source. Glucose may be converted into other carbohydrates such as starch (a storage carbohydrate), cellulose or lignin (structural carbohydrates). We can summarise the process of photosynthesis as follows - Green leaves use light energy to combine carbon dioxide and water together to make glucose and oxygen. This process is called photosynthesis and takes place in the leaves of green plants. Chlorophyll [chlorophyll: The green chemical inside the chloroplasts of plant cells. It enables photosynthesis to take place.] is a green chemical found in plant cells which is essential for photosynthesis because it captures light energy from the sun and converts it into chemical energy. In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed. A limiting factor is a factor which slows down a process because it is in short supply. You need to know that photosynthesis can sometimes be limited because certain factors are in short supply. The most common limiting factors in photosynthesis are: Continue reading >>

Biochemistry - Is The Glucose Produced From Photosynthesis Considered An Aqueous Solution When Written As A Chemical Reaction? - Biology Stack Exchange

Biochemistry - Is The Glucose Produced From Photosynthesis Considered An Aqueous Solution When Written As A Chemical Reaction? - Biology Stack Exchange

Is the glucose produced from photosynthesis considered an aqueous solution when written as a chemical reaction? In the very simplified reaction for photosynthesis, the states of the reactants and products are clear to me except for glucose. Inside a plant, it would be dissolved in water, so would it be an aqueous solution or be considered a precipitate in some way? In the reaction $$\ce{6CO_2 {_{(g)}} + 6H_2O{_{(l)}} \rightarrow C_6H_{12}O_6{_{(?)}} + 6O_2{_{(g)}}}$$ what would I put in the place of the question mark? Yes, immediately after synthesis, glucose is dissolved in water. However, it is later used by the plant to build more complex sugars as well as starches and celluloses, which are not necessarily water-soluble. MattDMo Aug 25 '16 at 21:00 Im curious as to why you ask this question what you will do with this equation when completed. You do realize that what you have written is not a reaction but a partial summary of a whole series of reactions, which, in addition, involve other substrates that you have not included. David Aug 26 '16 at 22:14 Continue reading >>

Photosynthesis - Wikipedia

Photosynthesis - Wikipedia

Schematic of photosynthesis in plants. The carbohydrates produced are stored in or used by the plant. Overall equation for the type of photosynthesis that occurs in plants Composite image showing the global distribution of photosynthesis, including both oceanic phytoplankton and terrestrial vegetation . Dark red and blue-green indicate regions of high photosynthetic activity in the ocean and on land, respectively. Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy into chemical energy that can later be released to fuel the organisms' activities ( energy transformation ). This chemical energy is stored in carbohydrate molecules , such as sugars , which are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water hence the name photosynthesis, from the Greek , phs, "light", and , synthesis, "putting together". [1] [2] [3] In most cases, oxygen is also released as a waste product. Most plants , most algae , and cyanobacteria perform photosynthesis; such organisms are called photoautotrophs . Photosynthesis is largely responsible for producing and maintaining the oxygen content of the Earth's atmosphere, and supplies all of the organic compounds and most of the energy necessary for life on Earth . [4] Although photosynthesis is performed differently by different species, the process always begins when energy from light is absorbed by proteins called reaction centres that contain green chlorophyll pigments. In plants, these proteins are held inside organelles called chloroplasts , which are most abundant in leaf cells, while in bacteria they are embedded in the plasma membrane . In these light-dependent reactions, some energy is used to strip electrons from suitable substances, such as water, producing oxygen gas. The hydrogen freed by the splitting of Continue reading >>

Photosynthesis & Respiration

Photosynthesis & Respiration

Photosynthesis Light interception by leaves powers photosynthesis All organisms, animals and plants, must obtain energy to maintain basic biological functions for survival and reproduction. Plants convert energy from sunlight into sugar in a process called photosynthesis. Photosynthesis uses energy from light to convert water and carbon dioxide molecules into glucose (sugar molecule) and oxygen (Figure 2). The oxygen is released, or “exhaled”, from leaves while the energy contained within glucose molecules is used throughout the plant for growth, flower formation, and fruit development. There are several structures within a leaf that have important roles in the movement of nutrients and water throughout a plant. Each plant contains a branched system of tubes called xylem, which is responsible for water transport from the roots (where it is taken up) to the leaves (where it is used in photosynthesis). Water flows up from the roots, through the trunk and branches, to the leaves, where it is used in photosynthesis. Alongside xylem is another system of tubes called phloem, which transports the glucose formed in photosynthesis into the branches, fruit, trunk and roots of the tree. The ends of both the xylem and phloem transport systems can be seen within each leaf vein (Figure 3). The structure of xylem and phloem in a plant is analogous to arteries and veins in humans, which move blood to and from the heart and lungs. For more information regarding the structure and function of xylem and phloem, review the Irrigation and Rootstock sections. Leaves contain water which is necessary to convert light energy into glucose through photosynthesis. Leaves have two structures that minimize water loss, the cuticle and stomata. The cuticle is a waxy coating on the top and bottom of Continue reading >>

Bbc - Gcse Bitesize: Photosynthesis

Bbc - Gcse Bitesize: Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis captures energy for life on Earth. Many chemicals are made to allow life processes to occur in plants. These chemicals can move in and out of cells by the process of diffusion. Osmosis is a specific type of diffusion. Photosynthesis is a process used by plants in which energy from sunlight is used to convert carbon dioxide and water into molecules needed for growth. These molecules include sugars, enzymes and chlorophyll. Light energy is absorbed by the green chemical chlorophyll. This energy allows the production of glucose by the reaction between carbon dioxide and water. Oxygen is also produced as a waste product. This reaction can be summarised in the word equation: The chemical equation for photosynthesis is: Glucose is made up of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms. Glucose made by the process of photosynthesis may be used in three ways: It can be converted into chemicals required for growth of plant cells such as cellulose It can be converted into starch, a storage molecule, that can be converted back to glucose when the plant requires it It can be broken down during the process of respiration, releasing energy stored in the glucose molecules Plants cells contain a number of structures that are involved in the process of photosynthesis: Diagram of a plant cell involved in production of glucose from photosynthesis Chloroplasts - containing chlorophyll and enzymes needed for reactions in photosynthesis. Nucleus - containing DNA carrying the genetic code for enzymes and other proteins used in photosynthesis Cell membrane - allowing gas and water to pass in and out of the cell while controlling the passage of other molecules Vacuole - containing cell sap to keep the cell turgid Cytoplasm - enzymes and other proteins used in photosynthesis made here Continue reading >>

How Is Glucose Made In Photosynthesis?

How Is Glucose Made In Photosynthesis?

Adam Cloe has been published in various scientific journals, including the "Journal of Biochemistry." He is currently a pathology resident at the University of Chicago. Cloe holds a Bachelor of Arts in biochemistry from Boston University, a M.D. from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. in pathology from the University of Chicago. Sunlight shining on trees in the forest.Photo Credit: alexkich/iStock/Getty Images The first step for the formation of glucose from photosynthesis is the absorption of light. According to Estrella Mountain Community College's website, when sunlight hits an organism that can perform photosynthesis (such as a plant), one of three things can happen. The light energy can be given off as heat; it can be re-emitted at a different wavelength (color); or it can set off a chemical reaction. Photosynthetic organisms contain various pigments, such as chlorophyll, that can absorb and harness light to make high-energy molecules. When light gets absorbed by these pigments, it causes the release of a high-energy particle (called an electron), which can then be used to convert the light energy into chemical energy. This portion of photosynthesis is called the light reaction. because it has to occur in parts of the organism that receive sunlight. Once high-energy electrons have been generated, the photosynthetic organism can turn these electrons into sugar. The first step is storing this energy in a more stable form. The electron gets absorbed by molecules in the organism that are able to perform a series of reactions. These reactions use the electron's energy to form a molecule called adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is a molecule that is similar to DNA but is used by organisms as a temporary energy reservoir. In order to turn the energy from ATP into gluc Continue reading >>

What Is Produced As A Result Of Photosynthesis?

What Is Produced As A Result Of Photosynthesis?

What Is Produced As a Result of Photosynthesis? All living things consume energy in order to survive. Animals get their energy from the food they eat, but plants must absorb energy in a different way. Though plants use their roots to pull water and some nutrients from soil, the majority of plants' energy comes from the sun. Plants are able to convert sunlight into usable energy, in the form of glucose, due to the structure of their cells and a process called photosynthesis. Plants get most of the energy they need to survive via a two-stage process called photosynthesis. In the first stage, called the light-dependent reaction, sunlight is converted into two molecules. In the second stage, called the light-independent reaction, these molecules work together to form and synthesize glucose. Glucose is a sugar that plants use for energy. The cells of plants and animals differ slightly, in structure. For example, certain plant cells contain organelles called plastids, which help the cells store energy. Chloroplasts are plastids that contain the green pigment chlorophyll. This pigment is responsible for absorbing sunlight during the process of photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is a two-stage process. The first stage of photosynthesis is called the light-dependent reaction because sunlight must be present in order for the reaction to occur. During this stage, chloroplasts absorb and trap sunlight, converting it into chemical energy. Specifically, the light is converted into two molecules to be used during the second stage of photosynthesis. These two molecules are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The second stage of photosynthesis is called the light-independent reaction because sunlight is not necessary for it to occur. In thi Continue reading >>

When Does A Plant Change Sugar To Starch?

When Does A Plant Change Sugar To Starch?

Plant photosynthesis and energy creation are complex processes involving carbon dioxide, water and sunlight, facilitated by multiple enzymes to create the basic sugar called glucose. Much of the glucose plants produce is immediately metabolized into different forms of energy that plants use to grow and reproduce. The portions of glucose that are not immediately converted to energy are converted to complex sugar compounds, called starches. These are produced after the photosynthesis cycle. Plants then store starches for future energy needs or use them to build new tissues. Photosynthesis Plants are photoautotrophs. Unlike humans and animals, they create their own energy from sunlight and naturally occurring organic compounds. Photosynthesis is the process by which plants use light energy to create glucose by reacting this energy, in the form of electrons, with water and carbon dioxide in cell membranes. Glucose is then used during cellular metabolism in plant tissues to create energy. When sunlight is ample, plants often create more glucose than is needed for immediate metabolism and store it in starches. Starches Plants store starches in a variety of ways. Starch molecules are enormous when compared to other simple molecules, often containing thousands of bonded sugars. Photosynthesis is carried out in plant cells and requires two distinct processes known as light dependent and light independent reactions. Both most occur for glucose to be synthesized. Thus, plants build starches only after the metabolic processes of photosynthesis. Enzymes bond glucose molecules into more complex sugars that form starches. Storing Starches Plants create, use and store starches for many purposes, but the two major ones are cellulose synthesis and energy storage. Cellulose is the primary Continue reading >>

Photosynthesis Flashcards | Quizlet

Photosynthesis Flashcards | Quizlet

What is the ultimate energy source for the process of photosynthesis? What is the basic food made by a plant during photosynthesis? In the cell chloroplasts found in the leaves of the plant Carbon dioxide enters the plant through the stomata. The energy from the sunlight chemically combines the carbon dioxide and water to form sugar and oxygen. The plant uses the sugar for its life processes. the oxygen is released through the stomata. Why do seeds grow temporarily without light? They are living off the stored food in the seed. Once the stored food is gone, the seed/plant will not continue to grow unless it can perform photosynthesis. Without light, can a plant produce carbohydrates, proteins, and fats? What are the reactants and products of photosynthesis? Plants use glucose along with minerals from the soil to form ___________, __________, and ____________. Water is absorbed through the roots with specialized root cells What specialized tissues transport the water throughout the plant? Do aquatic plants produce their own food through photosynthesis? What do plants do with the extra glucose that they produce? They use it to produce carbohydrates , proteins, and fats. These are used as sources of stored energy. What is the job of a potato in a potato plant? Stored food for energy use at a later time. *Some plants produce a high level of carbohydrates such as potatoes, corn, wheat, maple trees, and beet sugar. *Some plants produce a high level of fats such as avocado, olives, peanuts and palm nuts. *Some plants produce a high level of protein such as beans, quinoa and tree nuts. List each as an example of a high level source of carbohydrates, proteins, or fats? Sugars produced by photosynthesis are used to provide energy to make other Carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Continue reading >>

How Are Respiration And Photosynthesis Related?

How Are Respiration And Photosynthesis Related?

How are respiration and photosynthesis related? Question Date: 2002-09-07 Answer 1: During photosynthesis, a plant is able to convert solar energy into a chemical form. It does this by capturing light coming from the sun and, through a series of reactions, using its energy to help build a sugar molecule called glucose. Glucose is made of six carbon atoms, six oxygen atoms, and twelve hydrogen atoms. When the plant makes the glucose molecule, it gets the carbon and oxygen atoms it needs from carbon dioxide, which it takes from the air. Carbon dioxide doesn't have any hydrogen in it, though, so the plant must use another source for hydrogen. The source that it uses is water. There is a lot of water on the earth, and every water molecule is composed of two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. In order to take the hydrogen it needs to build glucose molecules, the plant uses the energy from the sun to break the water molecule apart, taking electrons and hydrogen from it and releasing the oxygen into the air. The electrons it takes are put into an electron transport system, where they are used to produce energy molecules called ATP that are used to build the glucose molecule-- all made possible by the sun's energy. Thus, during photosynthesis a plant consumes water, carbon dioxide, and light energy, and produces glucose and oxygen. The sugar glucose is important because it is necessary for cellular respiration. During cellular respiration, the chemical energy in the glucose molecule is converted into a form that the plant can use for growth and reproduction. In the first step of respiration, called glycolysis, the glucose molecule is broken down into two smaller molecules called pyruvate, and a little energy is released in the form of ATP. This step in respiration does not req Continue reading >>

Bbc Bitesize - National 5 Biology - Photosynthesis - Revision 3

Bbc Bitesize - National 5 Biology - Photosynthesis - Revision 3

Uses of the sugar produced by photosynthesis The sugar can be broken down in plant cells by the process of respiration to generate ATP. The chemical energy released by respiration can be used by the plant for cellular activities such as protein synthesis or cell division. The sugar produced by photosynthesis can be converted into the sugar glucose. Thousands of glucose molecules can be linked together to form the complex carbohydrate starch. Starch The sugar produced by photosynthesis can be converted into the sugar glucose. Thousands of glucose molecules can be linked together to form the complex carbohydrate cellulose. Cellulose is a very tough molecule that is used to build the cell wall of plant cells. A leaf magnified to show a plant cell, microfibril and cellulose molecule : it contains the chemical elements carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Plant cells can convert the sugar into another type of energy storage molecule - fat. Plant cells can also combine sugars with nitrates to make amino acids and use these to produce proteins. Continue reading >>

Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis is the process by which plants, some bacteria, and some protistansuse the energy from sunlight to produce sugar, which cellularrespiration converts into ATP ,the "fuel" used by all living things. The conversion of unusablesunlight energy into usable chemical energy, is associated with theactions of the green pigment chlorophyll .Most of the time, the photosynthetic process uses water and releasesthe oxygen that we absolutely must have to stay alive. Oh yes, weneed the food as well! We can write the overall reaction of this processas: Most of us don't speak chemicalese, so the abovechemical equation translates as: six molecules of water plus sixmolecules of carbon dioxide produce one molecule of sugar plus sixmolecules of oxygen Diagram of a typical plant, showing the inputs andoutputs of the photosynthetic process. Image from Purves etal., Life: The Science of Biology, 4th Edition, by SinauerAssociates ( www.sinauer.com ) andWH Freeman ( www.whfreeman.com ),used with permission. Plants are the only photosynthetic organisms tohave leaves (and not all plants have leaves). A leaf may be viewed as a solarcollector crammed full of photosynthetic cells. The raw materials of photosynthesis, water andcarbon dioxide, enter the cells of the leaf, and the products ofphotosynthesis, sugar and oxygen, leave the leaf. Cross section of a leaf, showing the anatomicalfeatures important to the study of photosynthesis: stoma, guard cell,mesophyll cells, and vein. Image from Purves et al., Life:The Science of Biology, 4th Edition, by Sinauer Associates( www.sinauer.com ) and WH Freeman( www.whfreeman.com ), used withpermission. Water enters the root and is transported up to theleaves through specialized plant cells known as xylem (pronounces zigh-lem). Land plants must guar Continue reading >>

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