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How Insulin Pump Works

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Insulin Pumps, How Insulin Pumps Work

Your doctor might have suggested that you need an insulin pump to manage your diabetes better. Or maybe someone mentioned an insulin pump to you in passing and you do not know much about it! Perhaps you have a relative or friend that uses one and you are wondering if it might work for you. Either way, the idea of having a pump connected to you can sound super scary. Truthfully, using an insulin pump is much more complicated than the machine itself. Although a lot of patients worry about having “something” connected to them all the time, people who use insulin pumps to manage their diabetes almost never complain about being connected. In fact, most people report that they would never go back to insulin injections once they receive their pump. Trust us, the insulin pump does not perform some kind of magical mind control. In fact it is the opposite. The patient runs the show, even when the pump is connected. Let us cover a little bit more about insulin pumps for diabetes before we review who is a good candidate for an insulin pump. How insulin pump works An insulin pump is simply a device used to deliver insulin continuously, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. If this sounds too s Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Jill

    How does an insulin pump work?

    This is my own explanation, in layman's terms how a pump basically works. Feel free to add to my explanation.
    My pump is filled with Apidra which is a newer rapid acting insulin like Novolog, Humalog or Novorapid. It is programmed (by me) to cover my basal needs (like what Lantus and Levemir do) but I can program it to give me different basal amounts at different times of the day. So, here is how it works, I have a very small tube (a cannula) in my tummy that is connected to a tube and then to my pump. My basal rate from 12:00 am to 2:59 am is .8 units per hour. That means that every hour from midnight until 2:59 am my pump slowly eeks out .8 units of insulin to keep my sugar level. at 3:00 am my basal rate changes to .85 unit per hour b/c my sugar tends to rise starting at this time. So from 3:00 am until 10:00 am I slowly get .85 units of insulin each hour. Then at 10:00 I have another rate set...you get it.
    Ok, so for meals, I carb count and bolus my insulin myself. So, say I'm eating a turkey sandwich and some chips. My doctor and I have worked out an insulin to carbohydrate ratio for me. My ratio is for every 10 grams of carbohydrate I eat I take 1 unit of insulin. So my turkey sandwich has 10 grams of carbs (I got this awesome new low carb bread) and I'm eating 25 grams of carbs worth of chips (you just read the labels on serving size and how many grams of carbs). My total carb for the meal would be 35 grams of carbs. That means I would need 3.5 units of insulin to cover my meal. I just dial up 3.5 units on my pump, push ACT and it delivers it to me. It also has a feature where, I test my sugar, I have my goal programmed into my pump (my goal is 90 mg/dl, that's 5 uk) if my sugar is higher than my goal then I also have my correction factors figured into my pump and the pump will tell me how much insulin I need to take to bring my sugar back to my goal and then I can put in the carbs I'm eating and it will tell me how much to take for the meal PLUS the correction factor. I change the cannula and fill my insulin reservoir every 3 to 4 days. I would like to end by saying pumping is the best decision I ever made.

  2. Lois

    I think you have said it all, but would note that everyone is different and it will take time to adjust basal/bolus amounts.
    Having been on the pump for almost 4 years, I would say that this is the best control that I have had. No problems with changing infusion sets or keeping up with the changes in my basal/bolus rates. As Jill said, this is the best decision I have ever made.

  3. tralea

    You said it pretty good Jill!!

  4. -> Continue reading
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Top 10 Best Selling Water Pumps In India Get the information about top 10 best selling brands pump units online in India! This information is shared on the behalf of pumpkart.com, for helping customers who are seeking for a desired pump unit online. Pumpkart is Indias leading online marketplace with a massive range of pumps from different manufacturers, dealers, distributors and other sellers. See what the customers were looking and ordering mainly from the pumpkart in the past few months. The list includes monoblock pump sets, borewell submersible pumps and booster pumps which are mainly used in residential applications. Khaitan Self Priming Monoblock Pump Gallop Hi-Flow (1HP) Havells Self Priming Monoblock Pump Hi-Flow S1 (1.0HP) Kops Sewage Submersible Pump KQ750B2 (1HP) B-Power 4 Submersible Single Phase 54M/F-170 (1HP) Oswal 3 Submersible Single Phase OSO-5 SF D (1HP) 5GL Mini Fresh 50 (0.5HP) CRI Self Priming Monoblock Pump PSM-7 (1HP) Lubi Single Phase Open Well Pump LHL-150B (0.5HP) Lubi Home Pressure Booster Pump LPD 90 Crompton Greaves Mini Marvel I (1HP) Crompton Greaves Mini Samudra II (0.5HP) Crompton Greaves Pressure Booster Pump 10MSMB5D1.00-O25 (1HP Cro

Insulin Pumps

Insulin pumps Insulin​ pumps continuously deliver insulin. Their formal name is continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump. The pump is ​about the size of a phone pager, and is worn on the belt or kept in a pocket. An insulin pump allows your child to get as much insulin as needed without having to get a new needle each time. How insulin pumps work An insulin pump system is made of four main parts: a small cartridge of insulin called a reservoir a thin plastic tube (the cannula) that sits under the skin flexible plastic tubing that connects the cannula to the reservoir a pump which allows you to set and change the amount of insulin delivered. The cannula within the infusion set is placed in the fat under your child’s skin with an infusion set insertion device. The insertion device pricks a needle through the skin. The needle brings with it the cannula. The infusion set insertion device is then removed along with the needle while the cannula stays in place within the infusion set. The infusion set must be replaced every two or three days. How an insulin pump works The insulin is delivered from the reservoir to your child’s body through flexible tubing to the cannula. You Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Jill

    How does an insulin pump work?

    This is my own explanation, in layman's terms how a pump basically works. Feel free to add to my explanation.
    My pump is filled with Apidra which is a newer rapid acting insulin like Novolog, Humalog or Novorapid. It is programmed (by me) to cover my basal needs (like what Lantus and Levemir do) but I can program it to give me different basal amounts at different times of the day. So, here is how it works, I have a very small tube (a cannula) in my tummy that is connected to a tube and then to my pump. My basal rate from 12:00 am to 2:59 am is .8 units per hour. That means that every hour from midnight until 2:59 am my pump slowly eeks out .8 units of insulin to keep my sugar level. at 3:00 am my basal rate changes to .85 unit per hour b/c my sugar tends to rise starting at this time. So from 3:00 am until 10:00 am I slowly get .85 units of insulin each hour. Then at 10:00 I have another rate set...you get it.
    Ok, so for meals, I carb count and bolus my insulin myself. So, say I'm eating a turkey sandwich and some chips. My doctor and I have worked out an insulin to carbohydrate ratio for me. My ratio is for every 10 grams of carbohydrate I eat I take 1 unit of insulin. So my turkey sandwich has 10 grams of carbs (I got this awesome new low carb bread) and I'm eating 25 grams of carbs worth of chips (you just read the labels on serving size and how many grams of carbs). My total carb for the meal would be 35 grams of carbs. That means I would need 3.5 units of insulin to cover my meal. I just dial up 3.5 units on my pump, push ACT and it delivers it to me. It also has a feature where, I test my sugar, I have my goal programmed into my pump (my goal is 90 mg/dl, that's 5 uk) if my sugar is higher than my goal then I also have my correction factors figured into my pump and the pump will tell me how much insulin I need to take to bring my sugar back to my goal and then I can put in the carbs I'm eating and it will tell me how much to take for the meal PLUS the correction factor. I change the cannula and fill my insulin reservoir every 3 to 4 days. I would like to end by saying pumping is the best decision I ever made.

  2. Lois

    I think you have said it all, but would note that everyone is different and it will take time to adjust basal/bolus amounts.
    Having been on the pump for almost 4 years, I would say that this is the best control that I have had. No problems with changing infusion sets or keeping up with the changes in my basal/bolus rates. As Jill said, this is the best decision I have ever made.

  3. tralea

    You said it pretty good Jill!!

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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Welcome to Type 1 overviews the OneTouch Ping.

Onetouch Ping® Insulin Pump And Meter Remote

Say hello to the OneTouch Ping® Glucose Management System The OneTouch Ping® is the two-part system with one thing on its mind: helping you perform at your best. When used together with the OneTouch Ping® Insulin Pump, the Meter Remote communicates wirelessly to deliver insulin from the pump. Start the process to get your OneTouch Ping® System Our inside sales department will help you every step of the way. GET STARTED The OneTouch Ping® Meter Remote controls pump functions from up to 10 feet away, which means you can keep your OneTouch Ping® Insulin Pump under cover. With the OneTouch Ping®, you get great clinical performance* and features designed with your lifestyle in mind. Basal insulin keeps your blood sugar steady between meals. OneTouch Ping® System gives you a wide range of dosing options with a low basal insulin increment of 0.025 U/hr. Because how much you need is unique to you, OneTouch Ping® System precision is key. Superior post-meal control1‡ The bolus calculator designed by Animas delivers superior post-meal control compared to the Medtronic Paradigm® Bolus Wizard®. The bolus calculator in the OneTouch Ping® System automatically determines how much bol Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Jill

    How does an insulin pump work?

    This is my own explanation, in layman's terms how a pump basically works. Feel free to add to my explanation.
    My pump is filled with Apidra which is a newer rapid acting insulin like Novolog, Humalog or Novorapid. It is programmed (by me) to cover my basal needs (like what Lantus and Levemir do) but I can program it to give me different basal amounts at different times of the day. So, here is how it works, I have a very small tube (a cannula) in my tummy that is connected to a tube and then to my pump. My basal rate from 12:00 am to 2:59 am is .8 units per hour. That means that every hour from midnight until 2:59 am my pump slowly eeks out .8 units of insulin to keep my sugar level. at 3:00 am my basal rate changes to .85 unit per hour b/c my sugar tends to rise starting at this time. So from 3:00 am until 10:00 am I slowly get .85 units of insulin each hour. Then at 10:00 I have another rate set...you get it.
    Ok, so for meals, I carb count and bolus my insulin myself. So, say I'm eating a turkey sandwich and some chips. My doctor and I have worked out an insulin to carbohydrate ratio for me. My ratio is for every 10 grams of carbohydrate I eat I take 1 unit of insulin. So my turkey sandwich has 10 grams of carbs (I got this awesome new low carb bread) and I'm eating 25 grams of carbs worth of chips (you just read the labels on serving size and how many grams of carbs). My total carb for the meal would be 35 grams of carbs. That means I would need 3.5 units of insulin to cover my meal. I just dial up 3.5 units on my pump, push ACT and it delivers it to me. It also has a feature where, I test my sugar, I have my goal programmed into my pump (my goal is 90 mg/dl, that's 5 uk) if my sugar is higher than my goal then I also have my correction factors figured into my pump and the pump will tell me how much insulin I need to take to bring my sugar back to my goal and then I can put in the carbs I'm eating and it will tell me how much to take for the meal PLUS the correction factor. I change the cannula and fill my insulin reservoir every 3 to 4 days. I would like to end by saying pumping is the best decision I ever made.

  2. Lois

    I think you have said it all, but would note that everyone is different and it will take time to adjust basal/bolus amounts.
    Having been on the pump for almost 4 years, I would say that this is the best control that I have had. No problems with changing infusion sets or keeping up with the changes in my basal/bolus rates. As Jill said, this is the best decision I have ever made.

  3. tralea

    You said it pretty good Jill!!

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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