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How Insulin Pump Works

What Is Insulin Pump Therapy?

What Is Insulin Pump Therapy?

Through the following simple questions and related answers, you can get an understanding of what an insulin pump is and how insulin pump therapy works, helping you keep your glucose levels under control whilst maintaining your lifestyle. What is a pump and how does it work? An insulin pump is a small electronic device, about the size of a mobile phone. It can be easily carried on a belt, inside a pocket, or even attached to a bra thus becoming virtually invisible to others and allowing a very discreet therapy. The pump can help you more closely mimic the way a healthy pancreas functions. The pump, through a Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII), replaces the need for frequent injections by delivering precise doses of rapid-acting insulin 24 hours a day to closely match your body's needs. Basal Rate: A programmed insulin rate made of small amounts of insulin delivered continuously mimics the basal insulin production by the pancreas for normal functions of the body (not including food). The programmed rate is determined by your healthcare professional based on your personal needs. This basal rate delivery can also be customised according to your specific daily needs. For example, it can be suspended or increased / decreased for a definite time frame: this is not possible with basal insulin injections. Bolus Dose: Additional insulin can be delivered "on demand" to match the food you are going to eat or to correct high blood sugar. Insulin pumps have bolus calculators that help you calculate your bolus amount based on settings that are pre-determined by your healthcare professional and again based on your special needs. What are the benefits of insulin pump therapy and how can it help you achieve better glucose control? Insulin pump therapy offers multiple clinica Continue reading >>

The Advantages And Disadvantages Of An Insulin Pump

The Advantages And Disadvantages Of An Insulin Pump

What is an insulin pump? An insulin pump is a small, computerized device that delivers insulin continuously throughout the day. It attempts to mimic the normal pancreas's release of insulin, but you must tell the pump how much insulin to inject. It delivers insulin in two ways: a basal rate which is a continuous, small trickle of insulin that keeps blood glucose stable between meals and overnight; and a bolus rate, which is a much higher rate of insulin taken before eating to "cover" the food you plan to eat. Effective, safe use of the pump requires: Commitment to checking blood glucose at least 4 times a day, every day. Adjusting insulin doses based on blood glucose levels, carbohydrate intake, and physical activity. The main advantages of pump therapy are: Increased flexibility in lifestyle. Predictable insulin delivery. Precise insulin delivery. Ability to accurately deliver 1/10th of a unit of insulin. Tighter blood glucose control, while reducing the risk of low blood glucose. Reducing episodes of severe hypoglycemia. Reducing wide fluctuations in blood glucose. Helping manage the "dawn phenomenon." The main disadvantages of pump therapy are: Risk of skin infections at the catheter site. Risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) from pump malfunction or absorption problems. Cost: pumps are expensive, plus the continuing cost of supplies. Checking blood glucose at least 4 times per day. Letting others know that you have diabetes. Is pump therapy for you? Ask yourself these questions: Are you ready to be attached to a device that lets people know you have diabetes? Do you have realistic expectations? It is not the "magic bullet" that will solve all your blood glucose problems. Are you comfortable with the technology and mechanics of operating a pump? Are you committed to c Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump For Diabetes

Insulin Pump For Diabetes

How does an insulin pump work? The typical insulin pump is attached to a thin plastic tube (an infusion set) that has a soft cannula (or plastic needle) at the end through which insulin passes. This cannula is inserted under the skin, usually on the abdomen. The cannula is changed every two days. The tubing can be disconnected from the pump while showering or swimming. The pump is used for continuous insulin delivery, 24 hours a day. The amount of insulin is programmed and is administered at a constant rate (basal rate). Often, the amount of insulin needed over the course of 24 hours varies depending on factors like exercise, activity level, and sleep. The insulin pump allows the user to program many different basal rates to allow for variation in lifestyle. In addition, the user can program the pump to deliver a bolus (large dose of insulin) during meals to cover the excess demands of carbohydrate ingestion. How common is an insulin pump? Hundreds of thousands of people with diabetes worldwide are using an insulin pump. Although insulin pumps were first used by people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 diabetes sometime use them as well. Many children successfully use insulin pumps. Insulin pumps allow for tight blood sugar control and lifestyle flexibility while minimizing the effects of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Newer models of the pump have been developed that do not require a tubing, in fact - the insulin delivery device is placed directly on the skin and any adjustments needed for insulin delivery are made through a PDA like device that must be kept within a 6 foot range of the insulin delivery device, and can be worn in a pocket, kept in a purse, or on a tabletop when working. Probably the most exciting innovation in pump technology is the ability to Continue reading >>

How Pumping Works

How Pumping Works

An insulin pump is a device about the size of a cell phone that contains a cartridge of rapid-acting insulin. A pump has a screen and buttons for programming the pump’s internal computer, and a precise motor that pushes the insulin from the cartridge into your body through a thin plastic tube called an infusion set. How is insulin delivered? Like your pancreas, an insulin pump releases small amounts of rapid-acting insulin to keep blood glucose levels steady between meals and during sleep. This is called the basal rate. Basal insulin takes the place of long-acting insulin. Then, at meal or snack time, you can tell the pump to deliver the amount of insulin needed to match the grams of carbohydrate in the food that is eaten, just like a healthy pancreas. This is called a bolus. A bolus can also be given to correct a high blood glucose. How is an insulin pump connected to my body? Every 2-3 days, a thin plastic tube called a cannula is inserted just underneath the skin using an infusion set. The infusion set is typically an all-in-one set that uses a thin introducer needle to insert the soft, thin cannula, which is then removed once the cannula is under the skin. A tube connects the infusion set to the pump using a Luer connector, a standard locking mechanism that securely attaches the tube to the pump.. Your healthcare professional will help you determine the best insulin infusion site for you. Typical infusion sites include the abdomen, hips, buttocks, upper back arm, and thighs. How is an insulin pump worn? Most pumps are so small and discreet, no one has to know you're wearing one unless you want them to. Plus, there are so many accessories available, you have many options to choose from. And for pumps that share information and communicate wirelessly using a meter-r Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin pump therapy can give you the better control you want for your lifestyle.1, 2 Technology for Joy & Jake What Is Insulin Pump Therapy? An insulin pump is a small device about the size of a small cell phone that is worn externally and can be discreetly clipped to your belt, slipped into a pocket, or hidden under your clothes. It delivers precise doses of rapid-acting insulin to closely match your body’s needs: Basal Rate: Small amounts of insulin delivered continuously (24/7) for normal functions of the body (not including food). The programmed rate is determined by your healthcare professional. Bolus Dose: Additional insulin you can deliver “on demand” to match the food you are going to eat or to correct a high blood sugar. Insulin pumps have bolus calculators that help you calculate your bolus amount based on settings that are determined by your healthcare professional. Buttons to program your insulin LCD screen to show what you are programming Battery compartment to hold 1 AAA alkaline battery Reservoir compartment that holds insulin A plastic cartridge that holds the insulin that is locked into the insulin pump. It comes with a transfer guard (blue piece at the top that is removed before inserting the reservoir into the pump) that assists with pulling the insulin from a vial into the reservoir. A reservoir can hold up to 300 units of insulin and is changed every two to three days. An infusion set includes a thin tube that goes from the reservoir to the infusion site on your body. The cannula is inserted with a small needle that is removed after it is in place. It goes into sites (areas) on your body similar to where you give insulin injections. The infusion set is changed every two to three days. An infusion set is placed into the insertion device and wi Continue reading >>

Convenient Diabetes Care: The Insulin Pump

Convenient Diabetes Care: The Insulin Pump

Insulin pumps are small, computerized devices that some people with diabetes use to help manage their blood sugar. They wear their pump on their belt or put it in their pocket. The pump releases rapid-acting insulin into your body through a small, flexible tube (called a catheter) which goes under your belly's skin and is taped in place. The insulin pump works nonstop, according to a programmed plan unique to each pump wearer. You can change the amount of insulin delivered. Between meals and overnights, the pump constantly delivers a small amount of insulin to keep your blood sugar in the target range. This is called the "basal rate." When you eat food, you can program extra insulin -- a "bolus dose" -- into the pump. You can calculate how much of a bolus you need based on the grams of carbohydrates you eat or drink. When you use an insulin pump, you must check your blood sugar level at least four times a day. You set the doses of your insulin and make adjustments to the dose depending on your food and exercise. Some doctors prefer the insulin pump because it releases insulin slowly, like how a normal pancreas works. Another advantage of the insulin pump is that you don't have to measure insulin into a syringe. Research is mixed on whether the pump provides better blood sugar control than more than one daily injection. An insulin pump is a small computerized device that delivers insulin into the body. This is different from injecting insulin throughout the day using insulin syringes and needles. Insulin pumps can be programmed to deliver very precise amounts of insulin in a continuous (basal) dose and in carefully planned extra (bolus) doses delivered at specific times throughout the day, usually when eating. Some pumps, like the one in this picture, connect to the body Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps, How Insulin Pumps Work

Insulin Pumps, How Insulin Pumps Work

Your doctor might have suggested that you need an insulin pump to manage your diabetes better. Or maybe someone mentioned an insulin pump to you in passing and you do not know much about it! Perhaps you have a relative or friend that uses one and you are wondering if it might work for you. Either way, the idea of having a pump connected to you can sound super scary. Truthfully, using an insulin pump is much more complicated than the machine itself. Although a lot of patients worry about having “something” connected to them all the time, people who use insulin pumps to manage their diabetes almost never complain about being connected. In fact, most people report that they would never go back to insulin injections once they receive their pump. Trust us, the insulin pump does not perform some kind of magical mind control. In fact it is the opposite. The patient runs the show, even when the pump is connected. Let us cover a little bit more about insulin pumps for diabetes before we review who is a good candidate for an insulin pump. How insulin pump works An insulin pump is simply a device used to deliver insulin continuously, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. If this sounds too sci-fi for you, let’s break it down to basics. An insulin pump is like a bicycle. You, the patient, are the operator. For most of the day and night, the bicycle (or pump) is headed down hill, meaning the bicycle driver (or patient) performs very little effort. The pump coasts by itself and delivers small amounts of insulin all day and all night. Doctors refer to this coasting function as “basal”, or, background insulin. The “basal” function of the pump requires such little effort from the patient because the pump is programmed to flow automatically. But, like any bike ride, things are Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump

Insulin Pump

An insulin pump is a medical device used for the administration of insulin in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy. The device configuration may vary depending on design. A traditional pump includes: the pump (including controls, processing module, and batteries) a disposable reservoir for insulin (inside the pump) a disposable infusion set, including a cannula for subcutaneous insertion (under the skin) and a tubing system to interface the insulin reservoir to the cannula. Other configurations are possible. For instance, more recent models may include disposable or semi-disposable designs for the pumping mechanism and may eliminate tubing from the infusion set. An insulin pump is an alternative to multiple daily injections of insulin by insulin syringes or an insulin pen and allows for intensive insulin therapy when used in conjunction with blood glucose monitoring and carb counting. Medical uses[edit] Advantages[edit] Users report better quality of life (QOL) compared to using other devices for administering insulin. The improvement in QOL is reported in type 1 and insulin-requiring type 2 diabetes subjects on pumps.[1] The use of rapid-acting insulin for basal needs offers relative freedom from a structured meal and exercise regime previously needed to control blood sugar with slow-acting insulin.[citation needed] Programmable basal rates allow for scheduled insulin deliveries of varying amounts at different times of the day. This is especially useful in controlling events such as the dawn phenomenon resulting in less low blood sugar during the night.[2] Many users feel that bolusing insulin from a pump is more convenient and discreet than injection.[2][3] Insulin pumps make it possible to deliver more pre Continue reading >>

How Insulin Pumps Work

How Insulin Pumps Work

Tweet An insulin pump is a machine which enables insulin to be delivered either automatically, or in response to instructions given by the pump wearer. It drip feeds insulin into the body through the day and can also deliver larger doses of insulin whenever needed, such as before meals. Insulin pumps can also be programmed to deliver specific doses at set times. Diagram of a tethered insulin pump An example of a typical ‘tethered insulin pump’ (insulin pumps connected to the body via tubing). Buttons: Allows the wearer to make choices about how much insulin to deliver and when. Display screen: Interacts with the buttons to display information and choices available to the wearer. Circuit board: Converts the wearer’s instructions into action – increasing the pump’s motor to deliver a faster rate of insulin. Motor: Turns round causing the plunger to push insulin through the reservoir and into the tubing. Reservoir: Holds insulin (usually enough for a number of days’ insulin use) Tubing: Links the reservoir in the pump to the cannula which goes into the wearer’s body. Cannula: A small tube that goes into and just under the skin, allowing insulin to pass from the tubing, through the cannula and into the body. The cannula is held in place by an adhesive patch. Battery: Provides the power needed for the insulin pump to work Note: The tubing, cannula and the adhesive patch are referred to as the infusion set. Patch pumps diagram Patch pumps work in a similar way to tethered insulin pumps but whereas tethered pumps are attached to the body via a tube, patch pumps attach directly to the surface of the skin with adhesive. Do pumps take blood glucose readings? Traditionally, pumps have not taken blood glucose readings but it is now possible to get pumps that have sens Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

What is an insulin pump? When you have diabetes and rely on insulin to control your blood sugar, insulin administration can mean multiple daily injections. Insulin pumps serve as an alternative. Instead of injections, the insulin pump delivers a continuous, preset amount of insulin, plus bolus doses when needed. Although you must still check your blood sugar levels, the pump can take the place of multiple daily insulin injections and help some people with diabetes better manage their blood glucose. An insulin pump is a small device that closely resembles a beeper or miniature computer. Slightly smaller than a deck of playing cards, the insulin pump has several key components: Reservoir: The reservoir is where the insulin is stored. It must be refilled periodically to ensure a steady stream of insulin. Cannula: A small needle and straw-like tube inserted in the fatty tissue under the skin that delivers insulin. The needle is withdrawn while the tube remains. You must switch out the cannula and its site periodically to reduce infection risk. Operating buttons: These buttons allow for programmed insulin delivery throughout the day and for programmed bolus dose delivery at mealtime. Tubing: Thin, flexible plastic transports insulin from the pump to the cannula. For some people, wearing an insulin pump provides more flexibility to administer insulin doses on the go without the need to carry many diabetic supplies. It also allows for a more fine-tuned dosing of basal insulin and possibly less structure around mealtime. Insulin pumps have two dose types. The first is basal rate, which is a continuous infusion that delivers a small amount of insulin throughout the day. This insulin helps keep your blood sugar levels stable between meals and at night. The other, called a bolus d Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Thinking about getting an insulin pump to manage your Type 1 diabetes? As an alternative to injecting insulin with a pen, an insulin pump can help improve your diabetes control and give you more flexibility. What does an insulin pump do? An insulin pump is a battery-operated device that provides your body with regular insulin throughout the day. The insulin is provided via a tiny, flexible tube (cannula), inserted under the skin. The tube can be left in for two to three days before it needs to be replaced and moved to a different insulin injection site. When eating, you can release extra insulin using the pump. This is known as a 'bolus dose'. Your nurse and dietitian will help you to work out how much insulin you need. How can I get an insulin pump? The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) haspublished criteria for suitability to use an insulin pump. Talk to your diabetes healthcare team about whether a pump is suitable for you. You're entitled to NHS-funded insulin pump therapy if you meet the following requirements: Your diabetes consultant recommends that you use an insulin pump. You'll need to show that you're committed to good diabetes control; for example, by having at least four insulin injections a day, checking your blood sugar levels at least four times a day, counting carbohydrates and adjusting insulin doses. You meet the NICE criteria (Technology Appraisal 151 (2008)) for NHS funding. You're having frequent hypos or hypos without warning that cause anxiety and have a negative impact on your quality of life, or your HbA1c is still 69mmol/mol (8.5%) or above, despite carefully trying to manage your diabetes. What pump types are available? Pumps vary in colour, battery life, screen size and extra features, such as a remote control. Your he Continue reading >>

An Overview Of Insulin Pumps And Glucose Sensors For The Generalist

An Overview Of Insulin Pumps And Glucose Sensors For The Generalist

Go to: 1. Introduction Diabetes is rapidly becoming a major health epidemic in most regions of the world [1]. All patients with type 1 diabetes and a significant number with type 2 diabetes require the use of insulin for controlling blood glucose. In the last 20 years, technological innovation and bioengineering has transformed the diabetes therapeutic landscape. There are several varieties of insulin and many different injection regimens that can be used. However, in spite of the availability of insulin vials and pens, the acceptability for patients and the glucose readings that are obtained with the use of single or multiple-dose injection regimens is not to the desired level. Insulin delivery with pumps, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), was introduced almost a half century ago. It utilizes short- or rapid-acting insulin types only, thus minimizing variability of administration and reducing the chances of glucose fluctuations. Pump technology has progressed to the level of precisely mimicking physiological demands. Programmable insulin administration in basal and bolus fashion is integrated and augmented with glucose biosensors to provide real-time, data-driven glycemic control and early detection of hypoglycemia. The prospect of a functional, closed-loop “artificial pancreas” with implantable or bionic capabilities is now within the realm of technological possibility in the near future. Continue reading >>

How Does An Insulin Pump Work?

How Does An Insulin Pump Work?

An insulin pump is a device about the size of a deck of cards that can be worn on a belt, kept in a pocket, or worn on your skin. It carries a reservoir of insulin connected to narrow, flexible plastic tubing (cannula) that is inserted just under the skin. Users set the pump to give a basal amount of insulin continuously throughout the day. Pumps also release bolus insulin to cover meals and at times when blood glucose levels are high, based on programming done by users. Insulin pumps control your blood sugar levels by delivering fast-acting insulin 24 hours a day. Before you can use an insulin pump, you must undergo a surgical procedure. Your doctor will create a place for the insulin pump to connect to your body. The area to insert the needle is usually created on your abdomen. You will need to use a needle to connect the pump's thin, plastic tube to your body. Once you have inserted the needle, you should cover and protect the site with a bandage. You will need to change the needle every few days. There are three different types of insulin dosages that will be used with your pump. Basal rates are the first type and are the dosages that are automatically given to you 24 hours a day. You can program your pump to give different dosages at different times of the day. For example, you may want your pump to deliver less insulin while you are sleeping. Bolus dosages are the second type; you will manually tell your pump to deliver a bolus dosage of insulin before you eat. You can also administer another bolus dosage if you eat more food than you expected. Supplementary or correction dosages are the final type; if you find that your blood sugar levels are too low or too high, you can tell your pump to give you extra insulin. For insulin pumps to work properly, they must remai Continue reading >>

What Is An Insulin Pump?

What Is An Insulin Pump?

An insulin pump is a small, portable and water-resistant device that continuously delivers rapid acting insulin 24 hours a day. Precise insulin delivery helps you achieve your ideal A1C and reduces the risks of highs without increasing lows.1,2 The benefits of insulin pump technology. Insulin pump technology offers benefits over multiple daily injections such as better HbA1c, fewer hypoglycemic events, reduction in glycemic variability and improved quality of life.1,2,3 It can help you better manage the need for insulin dose adjustments, particularly for meals and overnight and can help to achieve better glucose control.1,2,3 Instead of frequent injections, you change an infusion set every few days. Easier dosing: in the MiniMed 630G, the built-in Bolus Wizard® Calculator feature helps to ensure accurate dosing by taking into account any insulin already in the body, the current glucose levels, carbohydrate intake and personal insulin settings to determine the right dose you need. Fewer injections: precise amounts of rapid acting insulin are delivered throughout the day by the infusion set which is easily removed and replaced every 2 to 3 days Greater flexibility: the MiniMed 630G can be instantly adjusted to allow for exercise, during sick days or to deliver small boluses to cover meals and snacks. This can be easily done with a touch of a button, rather than with an injection. There is even a temporary basal rate option to proportionally reduce or increase the basal insulin rate, an option that can be used during exercise or during a sick day, for example. More convenience: the MiniMed 630G offers the additional convenience of a wirelessly connected blood glucose meter. This meter automatically sends blood glucose values to the pump, allowing more accurate Bolus Wizar Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

What is an insulin pump? An insulin pump is a small battery-operated electronic device that holds a reservoir of insulin. It is about the size of a mobile phone and is worn 24 hours a day. The pump is programmed to deliver insulin into the body through thin plastic tubing known as the infusion set or giving set. The pump is worn outside the body, in a pouch or on your belt. The infusion set has a fine needle or flexible cannula that is inserted just below the skin where it stays in place for two to three days. Only fast acting insulin is used in the pump. Whenever food is eaten the pump is programmed to deliver a surge of insulin into the body similar to the way the pancreas does in people without diabetes. Between meals a small and steady rate of insulin is delivered. The insulin pump is not suitable for everyone. If you’re considering using one, you must discuss it first with your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. How does it help me manage my diabetes? Research has shown that insulin pump therapy can reduce the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia as well as improve quality of life. Using a pump may also improve suboptimal blood glucose control. It is important that you have realistic expectations about pump therapy. It is not a cure for people who require insulin to manage their diabetes but a way of delivering insulin that may offer increased flexibility, improved glucose levels and improved quality of life. Pump therapy requires motivation, regular blood glucose checking, the ability to learn pump technology and the willingness to keep in regular contact with your diabetes educator or endocrinologist for review and adjustment of pump rates. Resources - Blog post- What I've Learned From 12 Years Pumping What insulin pumps are available to me? You can see av Continue reading >>

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