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How Having An Insulin Pump May Decrease The Chance Of A Diabetic Having A Diabetic Emergency.

Explain How Having An Insulin Pump May Decrease The Chance Of A Diabetic Having A Diabetic Emergency? | Yahoo Answers

Explain How Having An Insulin Pump May Decrease The Chance Of A Diabetic Having A Diabetic Emergency? | Yahoo Answers

Explain how having an insulin pump may decrease the chance of a diabetic having a diabetic emergency? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: A diabetic pump allows the basal dose to be reduced during night time lows. It takes careful planning in advance to do the same with slow acting insulins. If the pump is paired with a continuos glucose meter, the reduction in the basal drip can be automatic. Note that night time lows are dangerous as the diabetic may not be able to respond in time. Generally speaking, my young friend, a diabetic emergency would consist of a person having a hypoglycemic event/attack (lower than 'normal' level of blood glucose). This CAN be more immediately dangerous than having a hyperglycemic attack (having a higher than 'normal' blood glucose level) as they tend to come on rapidly ... within minutes, rather than the hours or days that a hyperglycemic event would take. The person, without immediate treatment could lose consciousness and even enter a comatose state or die. With a pump, basal rates of insulin can be adjusted ... however many times a day that would be appropriate ... to infuse insulin at very tiny rates. i.e. so that there's less danger of receiving too much insulin, which is what would cause the hypoglycemic event/attack. The pump user would only need to infuse a bolus of insulin each time they ate or drank anything that contained carbohydrates. What MUST be born in mind, however, is that pumps only use fast-acting insulins. Therefore, if a blockage should occur, or the cannula become detached, hyperglycemia would very quickly develop. This is why it's so important the pump users test their blood sugar (glucose) levels frequently throughout the day and, initially at least, the night. (Hyperglycemia can also lead t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management

Diabetes Management

The term diabetes includes several different metabolic disorders that all, if left untreated, result in abnormally high concentration of a sugar called glucose in the blood. Diabetes mellitus type 1 results when the pancreas no longer produces significant amounts of the hormone insulin, usually owing to the autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Diabetes mellitus type 2, in contrast, is now thought to result from autoimmune attacks on the pancreas and/or insulin resistance. The pancreas of a person with type 2 diabetes may be producing normal or even abnormally large amounts of insulin. Other forms of diabetes mellitus, such as the various forms of maturity onset diabetes of the young, may represent some combination of insufficient insulin production and insulin resistance. Some degree of insulin resistance may also be present in a person with type 1 diabetes. The main goal of diabetes management is, as far as possible, to restore carbohydrate metabolism to a normal state. To achieve this goal, individuals with an absolute deficiency of insulin require insulin replacement therapy, which is given through injections or an insulin pump. Insulin resistance, in contrast, can be corrected by dietary modifications and exercise. Other goals of diabetes management are to prevent or treat the many complications that can result from the disease itself and from its treatment. Overview[edit] Goals[edit] The treatment goals are related to effective control of blood glucose, blood pressure and lipids, to minimize the risk of long-term consequences associated with diabetes. They are suggested in clinical practice guidelines released by various national and international diabetes agencies. The targets are: HbA1c of 6%[1] to 7.0%[2] Preprandial blood Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies

Diabetic Emergencies

Tweet Diabetes can become serious in the short term if blood sugar levels become either too high or too low. The following information details what to do in an emergency. This covers low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), very high blood sugar (diabetic ketoacidosis) and what to do if you are left without your diabetes medication and/or supplies. What counts as a diabetic emergency? It can be a difficult area sometimes to know what counts as a genuine emergency. News reports in recent years have highlighted that a significant number of ‘999’ ambulance call-outs have not been necessary - for example to treat mild hypoglycemia which, in some cases, has been successfully treated befor e the ambulance has arrived. This isn’t to say that conditions, such as hypoglycemia, are not dangerous but that it’s important to know when a situation really is an emergency so that an ambulance is not unnecessarily called. When should I call an ambulance? An ambulance will be needed if someone has either very high or very low blood sugar levels that presents an immediate danger and neither they nor anyone around is confidently able to treat them. Ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome are both life threatening conditions. Hypoglycemia can also be life threatening in some cases. Someone with diabetes that is unconscious is one of the situations in which you should call for an ambulance. If you have doubts about whether the situation is serious enough to warrant an ambulance, call 111. Severe hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia can become dangerous if it is not treated quickly, particularly if it is a result of an insulin overdose. Severe hypoglycemia is generally recognised as hypoglycemia involving: Convulsions (fitting) Unconsciousness Hypoglycemia can often be treated at Continue reading >>

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Comprehensive Guide to Research on Risk, Complications and Treatment Substance abuse is described as the excessive use of a substance such as alcohol or drugs that results in significant clinical impairments as well as the loss of ability to function academically, professionally, and socially [1]. An individual who was healthy before the substance abuse began will typically begin to experience serious health problems over time, but extensive damage may be avoided or reversed if effective substance abuse treatment is received. This is not the case, however, for individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes, and although this is a manageable disease with proper treatment, substance abuse may cause it to become life-threatening. This guide will discuss, in detail, how substance abuse can negatively impact the life and health of a person with diabetes. Diabetes, also referred to as diabetes mellitus, is a condition in which the body is unable to properly regulate blood sugar levels. There are two forms known as type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but in order to better understand the difference between the two types, the role that insulin plays in the regulation of healthy blood sugar levels will be briefly described. During the digestive process, carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is a form of sugar that easily enters the bloodstream and is used by the body for energy. The pancreas normally responds to increasing blood sugar levels by initiating the production of the hormone known as insulin. As insulin levels increase, it signals the transfer of glucose into cells throughout the body and it also ensures that excess glucose will be stored in the liver in order to prevent high blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes, which is also called juvenile or insulin dependent Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

What is an insulin pump? When you have diabetes and rely on insulin to control your blood sugar, insulin administration can mean multiple daily injections. Insulin pumps serve as an alternative. Instead of injections, the insulin pump delivers a continuous, preset amount of insulin, plus bolus doses when needed. Although you must still check your blood sugar levels, the pump can take the place of multiple daily insulin injections and help some people with diabetes better manage their blood glucose. An insulin pump is a small device that closely resembles a beeper or miniature computer. Slightly smaller than a deck of playing cards, the insulin pump has several key components: Reservoir: The reservoir is where the insulin is stored. It must be refilled periodically to ensure a steady stream of insulin. Cannula: A small needle and straw-like tube inserted in the fatty tissue under the skin that delivers insulin. The needle is withdrawn while the tube remains. You must switch out the cannula and its site periodically to reduce infection risk. Operating buttons: These buttons allow for programmed insulin delivery throughout the day and for programmed bolus dose delivery at mealtime. Tubing: Thin, flexible plastic transports insulin from the pump to the cannula. For some people, wearing an insulin pump provides more flexibility to administer insulin doses on the go without the need to carry many diabetic supplies. It also allows for a more fine-tuned dosing of basal insulin and possibly less structure around mealtime. Insulin pumps have two dose types. The first is basal rate, which is a continuous infusion that delivers a small amount of insulin throughout the day. This insulin helps keep your blood sugar levels stable between meals and at night. The other, called a bolus d Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

What do Scott Verplank (5 time PGA tour winner), Jay Cutler (Quarterback for the Denver Broncos and the Chicago Bears), and Jackie Robinson (Brooklyn Dodgers) all have in common? Besides having achieved immense success in their sports career, they have also achieved a measure of success when managing their diabetes. Had they not managed their diabetes very well, it is safe to say that they would have not been at the top of their careers. Their performance would have been impeded by signs and symptoms of low or high blood sugar. When not performing at their best on a professional team, sportsmen can be fired for poor performance. So if an athlete is managing their diabetes, they should not be kept from playing professional or any kind of sports when they have the ability to do so. With all of their team mates counting on them, athletes with diabetes have a lot to think about, prepare for, and do, because of the added complexity that their diabetes brings to the playing field. There is a list of people in sports with diabetes on Wikipedia. Looking at the length of the list, it is clear that it is possible to succeed in just about any sport with diabetes. There are literally people with diabetes in every sport imaginable. There are people in football, baseball, basketball, canoe slalom, cricket, cycling, soccer, golf, ice hockey, and more. What does it take to be an athlete with diabetes? To be a successful athlete with diabetes, it is going to take some stellar self-management skills. The most important thing that an athlete with diabetes has to worry about is low blood sugars. With proper nutrition and strict control, you too can hit the ball out of the park, or reach the finish line, (all without episodes of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia). Hard work or low blood sugar? Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

LOW BLOOD SUGAR OVERVIEW Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, occurs when levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too low. Hypoglycemia is common in people with diabetes who take insulin and some (but not all) oral diabetes medications. WHY DO I GET LOW BLOOD SUGAR? Low blood sugar happens when a person with diabetes does one or more of the following: Takes too much insulin (or an oral diabetes medication that causes your body to secrete insulin) Does not eat enough food Exercises vigorously without eating a snack or decreasing the dose of insulin beforehand Waits too long between meals Drinks excessive alcohol, although even moderate alcohol use can increase the risk of hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes LOW BLOOD SUGAR SYMPTOMS The symptoms of low blood sugar vary from person to person, and can change over time. During the early stages low blood sugar, you may: Sweat Tremble Feel hungry Feel anxious If untreated, your symptoms can become more severe, and can include: Difficulty walking Weakness Difficulty seeing clearly Bizarre behavior or personality changes Confusion Unconsciousness or seizure When possible, you should confirm that you have low blood sugar by measuring your blood sugar level (see "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)"). Low blood sugar is generally defined as a blood sugar of 60 mg/dL (3.3 mmol/L) or less. Some people with diabetes develop symptoms of low blood sugar at slightly higher levels. If your blood sugar levels are high for long periods of time, you may have symptoms and feel poorly when your blood sugar is closer to 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Getting your blood sugar under better control can help to lower the blood sugar level when you begin to feel symptoms. Hypoglyc Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Shut-off Feature Prevents Low Blood Sugar, Study Finds Webmd

Insulin Pump Shut-off Feature Prevents Low Blood Sugar, Study Finds Webmd

TUESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of insulin pump reduced the number of moderate to severe low- blood -sugar episodes experienced by people with type 1 diabetes . The pump has a special sensor that can detect dropping blood - sugar levels and then suspend insulin delivery to prevent the development of dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), according to the researchers. "Hypoglycemia is a major problem in diabetes treatment ," said study senior author Dr. Timothy Jones, of Princess Margaret Hospital for Children in Perth, Australia. "The aim of the trial was to test whether a new type of insulin pump reduces life-threatening hypoglycemic events in patients with type 1 diabetes ." "We found, in a randomized trial, that this technology was able to prevent severe hypoglycemia," he said. "We don't like to be dramatic, but this may save lives, and certainly will improve quality of life and diabetes control." The findings are published in the Sept. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the body's immune system mistakenly destroys the insulin -producing cells in the pancreas . Insulin is a hormone that helps usher blood sugar into the body's cells to be used as fuel. Without insulin, blood- sugar levels rise and eventually reach life-threatening levels. Since their bodies no longer produce insulin, people with type 1 diabetes must replace that lost insulin. To do this, they must either take multiple daily injections of insulin or use an insulin pump that has a tiny catheter inserted underneath the skin to deliver the insulin. Getting the right amount of insulin can be difficult, however. People with diabetes have to factor in the amount of food they've eaten, their activity levels an Continue reading >>

2.3.2 Biomed Flashcards | Quizlet

2.3.2 Biomed Flashcards | Quizlet

Explain the role exercise plays in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. Exercise allows cells to get glucose without insulin, helps increase insulin sensitivity, burns the extra glucose that cannot get into the cells, which can help if blood sugar levels are too high. If you exercise too much, blood sugar levels can also drop too low and cause problems. Describe what happened to the model cell that was submerged in a low glucose solution for 20 min. The model cell swells because it is in a hypotonic solution. The water enters the cells to move the glucose out into the solution to create equilibrium. Explain why hospitals use saline solutions to hydrate patients instead of distilled water. It allows for more water to get into the cells. The sodium in the saline solution attracts the sodium in the cell, and replacing the sodium in the cells with water. How does preventing a diabetic emergency affect the day to day life of a diabetic? What special considerations do they have to make as they go about their day. Preventing a diabetic emergency affects the day to day life of a diabetic because they have to be constantly thinking about their symptoms, and how to deal with/prevent those symptoms. The special considerations they have to make is what they eat, how much they exercise, and how much insulin they need. Explain how having an insulin pump may decrease the chance of a diabetic emergency. An insulin pumps works constantly. This allows the diabetic to keep their blood glucose levels in range during meals and at night. The insulin pump decreases the chance of a diabetic emergency because the insulin is always available. It can also makes sure that your blood glucose levels stay in range. Continue reading >>

2.3.2.p Diabeticemergencyf Jjwoods.docx - Project 2.3.2...

2.3.2.p Diabeticemergencyf Jjwoods.docx - Project 2.3.2...

2.3.2.P DiabeticEmergencyF JJWOODS.docx - Project 2.3.2 Diabetic Emergency Introduction Insulin is needed to maintain proper blood sugar levels but in 2.3.2.P DiabeticEmergencyF JJWOODS.docx - Project 2.3.2... 100% (3) 3 out of 3 people found this document helpful This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 8 pages. Project 2.3.2: Diabetic Emergency!IntroductionInsulin is needed to maintain proper blood sugar levels, but in Type 1 diabetics, this balance does not happen naturally. The diabetic not only has to inject him or herself with insulin, but they also must keep the insulin level in balance with blood sugar, a feedback mechanism that happens naturally in non-diabetics. Since her diagnosis, Anna adjusted to checking and regulating her blood sugar with insulin. But on more than one occasion, she lost control of this balance and her body experienced a diabetic emergency. Read about each of these incidents and connect her symptoms to what was happening with her blood sugar, and consequently, her cells. In Activity 2.3.1 you learned that monitoring blood sugar is vital for the health of Type1 diabetics like Anna Garcia. The food Anna consumes is digested by the body and glucose is released into the bloodstream. Blood courses through the network of vessels connecting the top of the head to the tip of the toes. It transports the nutrients, oxygen, enzymes, and hormones that the bodys cells need to function and transports waste for disposal. Blood is filtered by the kidneys and excess water and other materials not needed by the body are then excreted as urine. In this activity you will use a model of a cell to simulate how the body reacts to varying blood glucose concentrations. Cells in your body are surrounded by a semi-permeable membrane that regulates which molecules and su Continue reading >>

Pltw: Biomedical Science – Unit 2: Diabetes

Pltw: Biomedical Science – Unit 2: Diabetes

Glucose Tolerance Testing can be used to diagnose diabetes by giving a person a large amount of sugar when they have not eaten, and then examine how their body responds to the sugar by watching the glucose levels in the blood. If the glucose levels maintain a high level of glucose, then they most likely have diabetes. Insulin injections are not the course of treatment for all diabetics because people with type 2 diabetes cannot do anything with insulin already produced, thus they would not be able to put the extra insulin injections to use. However for people with type 1 diabetes, then they need the insulin because their body does not produce it. *(Type 2 Diabetes can be reversed.)* Write my sample Activity 2.1.1 – Explain how lifestyle choices can impact a person’s risk for developing diabetes. Lifestyle choices can impact a person’s risk for developing diabetes because if someone is overweight, has very little activity, and has bad eating habits (such as eating food with high fat content or sodium), then they will become more likely for developing diabetes. On the other hand, people can reduce their chances of developing diabetes by eating a healthy diet, have a “normal” weight, and exercising regularly. When a doctor say that a person is “pre-diabetic”, it means that the patient does not have diabetes, but they may be showing symptoms of becoming a diabetic. In the activity we did, the patient A’s glucose levels stayed high for a short period of time before dipping lowing, therefore, patient A could be labeled as pre-diabetic. This means that if patient A were to change their eating habits and increase their activity level, then they would be able to avoid becoming a diabetics. One benefit of using models to represent scientific processes is enlarging Continue reading >>

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2)

A A A Are There Home Remedies (Diet, Exercise, and Glucose Monitoring) for Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition characterized by the body's inability to regulate glucose (sugar) levels in blood. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes can produce insulin, but the body is not able to use the insulin effectively. The cause of type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune reaction. Combinations of genetic risk factors and unhealthy lifestyle choices cause type 2 diabetes. The main diagnostic test for diabetes is measurement of the blood glucose level. Changes in lifestyle and diet may be adequate to control some cases of type 2 diabetes. Others with type 2 diabetes require medications. Insulin is essential treatment for type 1 diabetes. No effective approach yet exists to prevent type 1 diabetes. Prevention of type 2 diabetes can be accomplished in some cases by maintaining a healthy weight, exercising, sustaining a healthy lifestyle. Prediabetes is a condition that can occur before development of type 2 diabetes. Complications of any type of diabetes include damage to blood vessels, leading to heart disease or kidney disease. Damage to blood vessels in the eye can result in vision problems including blindness. Nerve damage can occur, leading to diabetic neuropathy. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a set of related diseases in which the body cannot regulate the amount of sugar (specifically, glucose) in the blood. The blood delivers glucose to provide the body with energy to perform all daily activities. The liver converts the food a person eats into glucose. The glucose is then released into the bloodstream from the liver between meals. In a healthy person, several hormones tightly regulate the blood glucose level, primarily insulin. Insulin is Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

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Ms.rex Science

Ms.rex Science

Blood Spatter Lab - At what height did the blood fall at the crime scene? Official Lab Report Due next Class (9/25)- Lab Report needs to be typed and printed when you come to class Use the data: Crime Scene Blood Spatter AVG: 13mm DNA basics - Reviewed shape, structure -- 4 nitrogen bases and how they bond together Built 3D models of DNA Review DNA basics DNA analysis - Gel Electro (paper version) to compare crime scene DNA to suspects and Anna's DNA Human Body system matching activity Reviewed first autopsy report Write the Following, it will be graded like a test NEEDS TO BE PRINTED OUT AND TURNED IN Introduction: Provide a brief case description. Summary of Findings: Provide evidence and support for your findings for each piece of evidence you analyzed – fingerprints, blood type, shoeprint, hair, unknown substance, blood spatter, and DNA analysis. Discuss any inconsistencies in the data and address the limitations of these methods in reconstructing what happened at the scene. Conclusion: Sum up the case findings and describe your conclusions as to the manner of death (natural, accident, or homicide) of Anna Garcia. NOTE: Think about your analysis as a whole and describe how combined data led you to a conclusion ****IN YOUR CAREER JOURNAL**** 1.Medical Examiner 2.Toxicologist 3.Morgue Assistant Please research and document the following information for the above listed careers. 1.Job Growth 3.Education needed ***YES, you need to cite your sources*** 10/5/17 HIPAA Review HIPAA Case Study HOMEWORK: FINISH CASE STUDY -- DUE NEXT CLASS 10/9/17 Turned in HIPAA Case Study Intro into what is diabetes Medical History of Anna and 2 other patients Glucose Tolerance Testing Lab -- Answer Lab specific questions and graph in journal 10/11-19 Diabetes research and posters Poster Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis Diagnostic tests include: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates diabetes. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as pregnancy or an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use these tests: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time and may be confirmed by repeat testing. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. If you're diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may also run blood tests to check for autoantibodies that are common in type 1 diabetes. These tests help your doctor distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes when the diagnosis is uncertain. The presence of ketones — byproducts from the breakdown of fat — in your urine also suggests type 1 diab Continue reading >>

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