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How Does Radiation Affect Insulin Pumps

Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

Indications, Contraindications, Warnings and Precautions All Medtronic MiniMed devices and associated components listed below are limited to sale by or on the order of a physician and should only be used under the direction of a healthcare professional familiar with the risks associated with the use of these systems. Patients should always discuss potential risks and benefits with a physician. Please review the product manual prior to use for detailed instructions and disclosure. For a full list of reference documents please visit our Download Library. Insulin Pumps Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) Sensors and Serters Meters Injection Port Mobile Accessory Remote Glucose Monitor CareLink Therapy Management Software Medtronic MiniMed® Insulin Infusion Pumps This section applies to insulin infusion function of all MiniMed external pumps, with or without Continuous Glucose Monitoring function, including MiniMed pump model MMT-508 or older, MiniMed Paradigm pumps, MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time pumps and MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time Revel pumps. Please refer to Medtronic MiniMed REAL-Time Continuous Glucose Monitoring section for important safety information regarding Continuous Glucose Monitoring function of the MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time pumps or MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time Revel™ pumps. Indications for Use The insulin pump is indicated for the continuous delivery of insulin, at set and variable rates, for the management of diabetes mellitus. Age restrictions apply depending on pump model. Contraindications Pump therapy is not recommended for people who are unwilling or unable to perform a minimum of four blood glucose tests per day and to maintain contact with their healthcare professional. Successful insulin pump therapy requires sufficient vision or hearing to allow recogn Continue reading >>

Evaluating Insulin Pump Functionality During Ionising Radiation Exposure

Evaluating Insulin Pump Functionality During Ionising Radiation Exposure

Concerns exist about the safety of ionising radiation on the components of insulin pumps and whether these will induce electronic failure or dysfunction. In this article, the authors explain how they subjected six insulin pumps to two radiation exposure protocols, firstly in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory and subsequently in computerised tomography scanning, in order to determine the probability of pump dysfunction being caused by radiation exposure. Continue reading >>

Fda: Ct Scans Safe For Patients With Electronic Medical Devices

Fda: Ct Scans Safe For Patients With Electronic Medical Devices

FDA: CT scans safe for patients with electronic medical devices Theres no need to let fear of electronic interference between computed tomography and electronic medical devices preclude the ordering of such scans for patients with insulin pumps, cardiac implantable electronic devices, or neurostimulators, the Food and Drug Administration said in a written notification. The probability of an adverse event being caused by exposing these devices to CT irradiation is extremely low, and it is greatly outweighed by the clinical benefit of a medically indicated CT examination, according to the new notification , which updates and replaces a preliminary health notification released on July 14, 2008. The preliminary notification said there was a possibility that the x-rays used during CT examinations may cause some implanted and external electronic medical devices to malfunction. It also included recommendations to reduce the potential risk of such events from occurring and cited adverse events experienced by a few patients with medical devices who had undergone CT scanning, including unintended shocks from neurostimulators, malfunctions of insulin infusion pumps, and transient changes in pacemaker output pulse rate. The new notification says there is an extremely low probability that a CT scanner directly irradiating the circuitry of certain implantable or wearable electronic medical devices can cause sufficient electronic interference to affect the function and operation of the medical device, and this probability is even lower when the radiation dose and the radiation dose rate are reduced. The FDA also notes that the interference is completely avoided when the medical device is outside of the primary x-ray beam of the CT scanner. The update, which provides additional report Continue reading >>

Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump and CGM System Intended Use of System The Animas® Vibe® System consists of the Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump paired with the Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor and Transmitter. The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump is indicated for continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion for the management of insulin-requiring diabetes. It can be used solely for continuous insulin delivery and as part of the Animas® Vibe® System to receive and display continuous glucose measurements from the Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor and Transmitter. The Animas® Vibe® System’s continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is indicated for detecting trends and tracking patterns in persons (age 2 and older) with diabetes, and is intended to complement, not replace, information obtained from standard home glucose monitoring devices. CGM aids in the detection of episodes of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, facilitating both acute and long-term therapy adjustments, which may minimize these excursions. Interpretation of results from the Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor and Transmitter should be based on the trends and patterns seen with several sequential readings over time. The System is intended for single patient use and requires a prescription. Pediatric Use (2-17 years old) Consider the following for pediatric use of the Animas® Vibe® System. Refer to the Caregiver Warnings in the “Before You Begin” section of the Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump & CGM System Owner’s Booklet for more information. Description of System The Animas® Vibe® System consists of the Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump and the Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor and Transmitter. The pump is used to deliver insulin continuously throughout the day (basal insulin), and to deliver a single amount (bolus insulin) at meal times to co Continue reading >>

Safety Information Article

Safety Information Article

Safety Information Article Information on this page is limited by the terms of our Disclaimer. Please Read! Insulin Pumps An insulin pump allows the replacement of slow-acting insulin for basal needs with a continuous infusion of rapid-acting insulin. By using an insulin pump, the patient can typically match the dosage of insulin to lifestyle and activities, rather than adjusting those to the body’s response to insulin injections. The advantages of using an insulin pump include the fact that it replaces the need for periodic injections by delivering rapid-acting insulin continuously throughout the day via a catheter, which greatly simplifies the management of diabetes. There are two basic types of insulin pumps, one is used as an external device and the other is implanted. Both types currently pose hazards to patients referred to MRI procedures. For an external insulin pump, in general, the device typically needs to be removed and kept out of the MRI environment to ensure that there is no adverse impact on the functionality of the external pump. The information below provides examples of MRI information for several, commonly used insulin pumps. Insulin Pumps, Animas Corporation This MRI information pertains to the following insulin pumps from the Animas Corporation: Animas 2020 Insulin Pump IR Animas 1200 IR 1000 Insulin Pump IR 1100 Insulin Pump IR 1200 Insulin Pump OneTouch Ping Insulin Pump Each insulin pump indicated above should not be exposed to very strong electromagnetic fields, such as MRIs, RF welders, or magnets used to pick up automobiles. Very strong magnetic fields, such as that associated with MRI, can “magnetize” the portion of the insulin pump’s motor that regulates insulin delivery and, thus, damage the device. For the patient: If you plan to u Continue reading >>

Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information - t:slim X2 Insulin Pump The t:slim X2 Insulin Pump with Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM (t:slim X2 System) consists of the t:slim X2 Insulin Pump paired with the Dexcom G5 Mobile Sensor and Transmitter. The t:slim X2 Insulin Pump is intended for the subcutaneous delivery of insulin, at set and variable rates, for the management of diabetes mellitus in persons requiring insulin. The t:slim X2 Insulin Pump can be used solely for continuous insulin delivery and as part of the t:slim X2 System to receive and display continuous glucose measurements from the Dexcom G5 Mobile Sensor and Transmitter. The t:slim X2 System also includes continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) indicated for the management of diabetes. The Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM is designed to replace fingerstick blood glucose testing for diabetes treatment decisions. The t:slim X2 System aids in the detection of episodes of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, facilitating both acute and long-term therapy adjustments, which may minimize these excursions. Interpretation of the t:slim X2 System results should be based on the trends and patterns seen with several sequential readings over time. The t:slim X2 System is indicated for use in individuals 6 years of age and greater. The t:slim X2 System is intended for single patient use and requires a prescription. The device is indicated for use with NovoLog or Humalog U-100 insulin. The t:slim X2 System is not intended for anyone unable or unwilling to: Test blood glucose (BG) levels as recommended by your healthcare provider Demonstrate adequate carbohydrate-counting skills (preferred, not required) Maintain sufficient diabetes self-care skills See your healthcare provider(s) regularly You must also have adequate vision and/or hearing in order to recognize you Continue reading >>

Interference Between Ct And Electronic Medical Devices

Interference Between Ct And Electronic Medical Devices

This website provides information about a rare and preventable type of interference between Computed Tomography (CT) and electronic medical devices. This information updates and replaces our 2008 preliminary public health notification. CT is a valuable type of diagnostic imaging. Most patients undergo CT scans without any adverse consequences. However, the FDA has received a small number of reports of adverse events that we believe to be associated with CT imaging of some implantable and wearable electronic devices (eg. insulin pumps, cardiac implantable electronic devices and neurostimulators). Our current understanding is that when a CT scanner directly irradiates the circuitry of certain implantable or wearable electronic medical devices (i.e. when the device is visible in the resulting CT image), it can cause sufficient electronic interference to affect the function and operation of the medical device. The probability that this interference can cause clinically significant adverse events is extremely low. Furthermore, the probability of x-ray electronic interference is lower when the radiation dose and the radiation dose rate are reduced. Interference is completely avoided when the medical device is outside of the primary x-ray beam of the CT scanner. The electronic medical devices for which we have received reports of adverse effects and have updated our recommendations are: Insulin pumps Cardiac implantable electronic devices (pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators) Neurostimulators Patients: Physicians recommend CT scans for medical reasons. The probability of an adverse event is extremely low. Healthcare providers: The presence of the devices mentioned above should NOT preclude the performance of an appropriate, medically indicated CT scan. The p Continue reading >>

No 4 | Neaace.org

No 4 | Neaace.org

Can insulin pump’s function be affected by exposure to XRAY? A patient had an insulin pump malfunction after the pump was exposed to x-ray. The pump company replaced the device under the patient's warranty and she had the new pump the next morning. For non patch (tubeless pumps): It is advised that pumps/CGM not be exposed to x-ray, MRI, etc. This is the information provided to patients by Medtronic RE exposure to magnetic fields and radiation: “ if you are going to have an X-ray, MRI, diathermy treatment, CT scan, or other type of exposure to radiation, take off your pump, sensor, transmitter, meter and remote control before entering a room containing any of these equipment. The magnetic fields and radiation in the immediate vicinity of these devices can make them nonfunctional or damage the part of the pump that regulates insulin delivery, possibly resulting in over delivery and severe hypoglycemia. If your pump is inadvertently exposed to a magnetic field, discontinue use and contact our 24 Hour Help Line for further assistance.” The warning also includes x-ray scanners at the airport. Patients should inform TSA agents that they are wearing an insulin pump and/or CGM and request a pat-down and/or wand.” Continue reading >>

Diabetic Girl’s $10,000 Insulin Pump Ruined By Radiation From Tsa Body Scanner

Diabetic Girl’s $10,000 Insulin Pump Ruined By Radiation From Tsa Body Scanner

Agents then demanded pat-down to make sure fruit juice, insulin was “not an explosive” Steve Watson Infowars.com May 8, 2012 A sixteen year old diabetic girl was forced to walk through a TSA body scanner by screeners while wearing an insulin pump, resulting in the expensive equipment being broken, and putting her health in jeopardy. Savannah Barry, who suffers from type one diabetes, meaning she has to wear an insulin pump at all times, says that TSA screeners spoke to her rudely and displayed complete ignorance with regards to her medical condition. “They need to get with the program and have some education across the board for TSA,” she told an ABC affiliate in Salt Lake City after the incident last week. “I went up to the lady and I said, I am a type one diabetic. I wear an insulin pump. I showed her the pump. I said, what do you want me to do? I usually do a pat down – what would you recommend?” Miss Barry said, adding that she also showed the TSA screener a doctor’s note explaining that the $10,000 piece of medical equipment should not be put through a radiation firing body scanner. When the screener told her to walk through the scanner anyway, miss Barry said she questioned the request. “Are you sure I can go through with the pump? It’s not going to hurt the pump? And she said no, no you’re fine.” “When someone in a position of authority tells you it is – you think that its right.” she added. Miss Barry’s mother called the makers of the insulin pump, who told her that they could not guarantee that it would function correctly after being exposed to the radiation from the body scanner. The company advised that miss Barry should come off the pump as soon as the plane landed and switch to insulin shots. “My life is pretty much in thei Continue reading >>

Insulin & Airport X Ray Machines

Insulin & Airport X Ray Machines

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Can anybody advise on where I might find more information with regard to insulin being passed through the X ray scanners at airports & whether it is damaged or de-natured as a result. Similarly I want to know if insulin pumps & blood/sugar monitors & strips are compromised by this procedure. The US Transportation Security Administration along with its Australian & Canadian counterparts all advise that insulin, insulin pumps & blood testing equipment should NOT be X rayed. They should only be visually appraised. I've contacted two insulin manufacturers about this but all I got was a cop out reply from one which indicated they'd not done any research. I'm hoping to get a more accurate scientific response from the other but I'm amazed that this issue has not been properly explored. I'm convinced that my blood/sugar monitoring kit was damaged by airport X ray machines during an August trip to Italy & having been denied the right to have my insulin visually inspected at Lisbon Airport recently I have stopped using those irradiated vials. On the outward bound trip from the UK I was asked if I preferred the insulin to be visually inspected. Why is this option not available world-wide ? Thankyou for your response "Dustydazzler" but I was hoping for a response offerring recent empirical scentific research into the matter. Furthermore with body X ray machines being installed in airports world wide, the diabetic community should be in possession of all the facts in order to argue their case at airports. Why is it that at Luton Airport for example the security team there ask, unprompted, if you would prefer your insulin not to go through the scanner but in Lisbon Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump For Diabetes

Insulin Pump For Diabetes

How does an insulin pump work? The typical insulin pump is attached to a thin plastic tube (an infusion set) that has a soft cannula (or plastic needle) at the end through which insulin passes. This cannula is inserted under the skin, usually on the abdomen. The cannula is changed every two days. The tubing can be disconnected from the pump while showering or swimming. The pump is used for continuous insulin delivery, 24 hours a day. The amount of insulin is programmed and is administered at a constant rate (basal rate). Often, the amount of insulin needed over the course of 24 hours varies depending on factors like exercise, activity level, and sleep. The insulin pump allows the user to program many different basal rates to allow for variation in lifestyle. In addition, the user can program the pump to deliver a bolus (large dose of insulin) during meals to cover the excess demands of carbohydrate ingestion. How common is an insulin pump? Hundreds of thousands of people with diabetes worldwide are using an insulin pump. Although insulin pumps were first used by people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 diabetes sometime use them as well. Many children successfully use insulin pumps. Insulin pumps allow for tight blood sugar control and lifestyle flexibility while minimizing the effects of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Newer models of the pump have been developed that do not require a tubing, in fact - the insulin delivery device is placed directly on the skin and any adjustments needed for insulin delivery are made through a PDA like device that must be kept within a 6 foot range of the insulin delivery device, and can be worn in a pocket, kept in a purse, or on a tabletop when working. Probably the most exciting innovation in pump technology is the ability to Continue reading >>

10 Best Practice Tips For Insulin Pump Care

10 Best Practice Tips For Insulin Pump Care

Properly caring for your insulin pump is important to help protect its longevity. We’ve compiled this list of “Best Practices” for you based on common questions from customers like you. Our devices are made to be durable enough to be part of your everyday life, but like anything, sometimes it’s important to go back to the basics of what works and what doesn’t so that it can last as long as possible. I know, a pump becomes a part of you (I’ve been pumping for almost 13 years!), but these are important good behaviors to keep in mind when using your pump daily. 1. Make Sure Your Hands Are Clean! Avoid exposure to sunscreens, lotions, insect repellents, and household and organic cleaning agents. So if you’re spending the day cleaning or just put lotion on, be sure to wash and dry your hands before handling your pump after using these types of products. 2. Open and Close Your Battery Cap with a Coin Use a thick coin, such as nickel or quarter, to open and/or close your battery cap. Tighten until the slot is horizontal to prevent it from overtightening. Personal tip: I admit, I’ve used a butter knife to open mine (this is a no-no!). One thing that might help is to keep a coin nearby where you store your extra batteries. I recognized I normally change my pump battery in the kitchen while I’m changing my site, which is why it was always more handy to grab a knife from the drawer. Now I have a few quarters stored near my battery and haven’t had any issues. 3. Clean Your Pump with a Mild Detergent When it’s time to clean your pump, wash your hands and use a cloth mixed with mild detergent, such as dish soap, and water, to wipe your pump clean. Do not place your pump under running water or submerge it into any liquid, and avoid cleaning it with household agen Continue reading >>

Airport Security X-rays May Damage Diabetes Devices

Airport Security X-rays May Damage Diabetes Devices

Experts warn of malfunction potential for insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2012 (HealthDay News) -- Full body X-ray scanners and luggage X-rays may damage some insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors, both used by many people with diabetes to manage their conditions. It's likely that every day, large numbers of travelers expose these diabetes care devices to X-rays while going through airport security "and some may unknowingly experience mild [or worse] malfunctioning as a result," wrote the authors of a recent editorial in the journal Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics. They recommend carrying a letter that details all of the medical supplies someone with diabetes needs to carry on board with them. They also recommend that if someone wears an insulin pump or continuous glucose monitors, the letter specifically state that these devices shouldn't be subjected to X-rays, either from a full body scanner or the X-ray machine that scans carry-on luggage. Instead, these devices should be hand-checked, according to editorial co-authors Andrew Cornish and Dr. H. Peter Chase, from the University of Colorado Denver. Dr. Tracy Breen, director of diabetes care for North Shore-LIJ Health System in New Hyde Park, N.Y., agreed with this advice. "I always recommend that people living with diabetes travel with a letter from their doctor stating their diagnosis of diabetes, what their travel needs are and what supplies they are Continue reading >>

Ct Scan May Interfere With Electronic Medical Devices

Ct Scan May Interfere With Electronic Medical Devices

CT Scan May Interfere With Electronic Medical Devices The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has received a small number of reports of adverse events thought to be associated with CT imaging of some implantable and wearable electronic devices, such as insulin pumps, cardiac implantable electronic devices, and neurostimulators, the agency said today in a safety communication. The new safety notice updates and replaces the FDA's preliminary public health notice from July 2008 on possible malfunction of electronic devices caused by CT scanning, as reported by Medscape Medical News. "FDA's current understanding is that when a CT scanner directly irradiates the circuitry of certain implantable or wearable electronic medical devices (i.e. when the device is visible in the resulting CT image), it can cause sufficient electronic interference to affect the function and operation of the medical device," the agency said. "The probability that this interference can cause clinically significant adverse events is extremely low. Furthermore, the probability of x-ray electronic interference is lower when the radiation dose and the radiation dose rate are reduced," the FDA said. "Interference is completely avoided when the medical device is outside of the primary x-ray beam of the CT scanner." The FDA emphasized that having an insulin pump, cardiac implantable electronic device, or neurostimulator should not preclude a patient from having an appropriate, medically indicated CT scan. "The probability of an adverse event being caused by exposing these devices to CT irradiation is extremely low, and it is greatly outweighed by the clinical benefit of a medically indicated CT examination," the agency said. For physicians ordering a CT scan, the FDA advises that if the CT scan will cover Continue reading >>

Question About Insulin And X-ray (airport)

Question About Insulin And X-ray (airport)

Question about insulin and X-ray (airport) Question about insulin and X-ray (airport) Hi, I am about to go abroad and have a concern about my insulin. When we go through the security point at the airport, our hand bags (with our monitors, test strips and insulin) go through an X-ray machine (if not sure if it's X-ray or IR), and I was wondering if it can spoil my insulin or blood glucose monitor (but I'm much more concerned about insulin) I entered Lilly's webpage but they don't have any contact e-mail (just a phone number) and I don't live in US. I wonder if any frequent traveler here came across this issue or had any problem. Initial reaction was that it is definitely not an issue...so thought I'd check. This web page, amongst others seems to confirm what I thought: and with further searching this seems like even more comprehensive information: Last edited by NickC; 1/07/09 at 10:54 AM. Reason: Another link A1C 6.4% (04/07), 5.4% (06/07), 5.6% (08/07), 6.4% (01/08), 6.9% (10/08), 6.9% (06/09) 7.8 (10/12), Dx 02/02/07. Now using Freestyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring. D.D. Family type 1 LADA new pumper via MM-522 I've walked right through security carring my insulin syringles test strips and moniter an have never been questioned.. Try to take a bottle of aquafina on and they tackle you and question you for possible terrist connections but 2 clear vials of unknown liquids and a pile of syringes no issue Member 7 yrs T1.5 - now on Levemir/Novorapid as of Nov-08 Hi, I am about to go abroad and have a concern about my insulin. When we go through the security point at the airport, our hand bags (with our monitors, test strips and insulin) go through an X-ray machine (if not sure if it's X-ray or IR), and I was wondering if it can spoil my insulin or blood glucose monitor Continue reading >>

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