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How Does Preventing A Diabetic Emergency Affect The Day To Day Life Of A Diabetic Quizlet

Pbs 2.3.2 Flashcards | Quizlet

Pbs 2.3.2 Flashcards | Quizlet

Activity 2.3.2 - Explain the role that exercise plays in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. The role that exercise plays in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels are that exercise burns the energy from glucose in the body, which lowers the blood sugar, and can help if blood sugar levels are too high. If you exercise too hard or for too long, however, blood sugar levels can also drop too low and cause complications as well. Therefore, one should always have an healthy amount, not too much or too little. Activity 2.3.2 - Describe what happened to the model cell that was submerged in a low glucose solution for 20 minutes. Explain why this occurs. In the model cell that was submerged in a low glucose solution for 20 minutes, would become bigger and swell up because as water comes in the glucose dilutes and goes out. Activity 2.3.2 - Explain why hospitals use saline solutions to hydrate patients instead of distilled water. Hospitals use saline solutions to hydrate patients instead of distilled water because saline solution replenished the body with nutrients, such as sodium as well as water, which is needed for muscles and nerves to work properly. In dehydration, the patient has usually lost salt as well as water, so the saline fully hydrates them and gives their body the salt it needs. Activity 2.3.2 - How does preventing a diabetic emergency affect the day to day life of a diabetic? What special considerations do they have to make as they go about their day. Preventing a diabetic emergency affect the day to day life of a diabetic because they know that their blood glucose levels are normal and that they wouldn't be in a critical condition. Special considerations they have to make as they go about their day is maintaining their diet so that they are eating a diet tha Continue reading >>

Biomedical Unit 2 Flashcards | Quizlet

Biomedical Unit 2 Flashcards | Quizlet

How does the body regulate the level of blood glucose? What are the main nutrients found in food? The main nutrients found in food are carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. How can carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins be detected in foods? What types of foods supply sugar, starch, proteins, and lipids? How can food labels be used to evaluate dietary choices? Food labels can be used to evaluate dietary choices by showing multiple nutrients that your body needs and it shows how much you receive by the serving size or all together. What role do nutrients play in the function of the human body? What are the basic recommendations for a diabetic diet? Exercise daily, Watch nutrient intake such as having a high protein diet, eating whole grains and plenty of vegetables. What are the main structural components of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids? What is dehydration synthesis and hydrolysis? How do dehydration synthesis and hydrolysis relate to harnessing energy from food? How is the amount of energy in a food determined? What are several ways the life of someone with diabetes is impacted by the disorder? How do the terms hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia relate to diabetes? What might happen to cells that are exposed to high concentrations of sugar? Type 1 diabetics do not produce insulin. Type 2 diabetics produce insulin, but the body does not permit this hormone to effectively do its job. What are the current treatments for Type 1 & Type 2 diabetes? What is the importance of checking blood sugar levels for diabetics? It informs you how much glucose is in your blood so you know how much insulin to inject, prevents diabetic emergency. Pumps insulin into the body at certain points during the day so they don't miss injections. Insulin pumps put the insulin directly into the blood Continue reading >>

Ch. 19: Diabetic Emergencies And Altered Mental Status

Ch. 19: Diabetic Emergencies And Altered Mental Status

What is the most common cause of seizures in adults? What is a normal blood glucose range for an adult according to NREMT standards? If a pregnant woman has just experienced a seizure without previous history of seizures or any other pertinent medical conditions what pregnancy-related ailment might be the cause of the seizure? Your arrive on scene to a patient that is actively seizing, what should your first concern be? Move furniture and other obstructions away from the patient in order to prevent injuries. Over which of the following factors that affect the survivability of a stroke patient does the EMT have the MOST influence? Which of the following statements about patients with altered mental status is CORRECT? Place the unresponsive patient on his or her side if no spinal injury is suspected. You may assume that the patient is still responsive even if there is no response to a painful stimulus. Remember that high-concentration oxygen may be detrimental to the patient. Always insert an oropharyngeal airway, as patients with altered mental status have no gag reflex. Place the unresponsive patient on his or her side if no spinal injury is suspected. Which of the following disorders frequently creates signs and symptoms that are similar to those associated with a stroke? In which of the following stroke screening methods is arm drift one of the screening criteria? Both the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale and the Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen The Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS) The Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen (LAPSS) Arm drift is not a criterion for any popular stroke screening system The Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS) Your patient is a 19-year-old male who was reportedly unconscious for a brief time. You learn that he rega Continue reading >>

Pltw: Biomedical Science - Unit 2: Diabetes

Pltw: Biomedical Science - Unit 2: Diabetes

Activity 2.1.1 - Describe how Glucose Tolerance Testing can be used to diagnose diabetes. Glucose Tolerance Testing can be used to diagnose diabetes by giving a person a large amount of sugar when they have not eaten, and then examine how their body responds to the sugar by watching the glucose levels in the blood. If the glucose levels maintain a high level of glucose, then they most likely have diabetes. Activity 2.1.1 - Explain why insulin injections are not the course of treatment for all diabetics. Insulin injections are not the course of treatment for all diabetics because people with type 2 diabetes cannot do anything with insulin already produced, thus they would not be able to put the extra insulin injections to use. However for people with type 1 diabetes, then they need the insulin because their body does not produce it. (Type 2 Diabetes can be reversed.) Activity 2.1.1 - Explain how lifestyle choices can impact a person's risk for developing diabetes. Lifestyle choices can impact a person's risk for developing diabetes because if someone is overweight, has very little activity, and has bad eating habits (such as eating food with high fat content or sodium), then they will become more likely for developing diabetes. On the other hand, people can reduce their chances of developing diabetes by eating a healthy diet, have a "normal" weight, and exercising regularly. Activity 2.1.1 - What do you think it means if doctors say that a person is "pre-diabetic"? When a doctor say that a person is "pre-diabetic", it means that the patient does not have diabetes, but they may be showing symptoms of becoming a diabetic. In the activity we did, the patient A's glucose levels stayed high for a short period of time before dipping lowing, therefore, patient A could be label Continue reading >>

Week 9: Chapter 16 Diabetic Related Emergencies

Week 9: Chapter 16 Diabetic Related Emergencies

reduction or an absence of the production of insulin by beta cells in the pancreas or defects of the insulin receptors -characterized by hyperglycemia (too much sugar) --Insulin- is the hormone that aids in the conversion of sugar and starches to a form that the body can transport to the cells to utilize for energy. 1. Type 1- (formerly insulin-dependent or juvenile) -ABSOLUTE lack of insulin results when pancreatic beta cells within the islets of Langerhans have been destroyed because of an immune dysfunction -pts. depend upon supplemental insulin for survival 2. Type 2- formerly non insulin dependent or adult onset) MOST COMMON -inability of the pancreas inability to produce a sufficient amount of insulin as the need for insulin increases or to properly use the insulin that is produced sufficient amount of insulin or to properly use the insulin that is produced. -managed by diet, oral mediations, or injectable medications *90-95% are diagnosed with Type II and it is rising because increase in life spans, obesity, high fat low fiber diets and sedentary lifestyle (doesn't receive regular amounts of physical activity) -increasing in adolescent d/t poor diet and lack of exercise 3. Gestational- occurs in 2-5% o pregnant women -characterized by glucose intolerance with initial onset during pregnancy -if left untreated can cause significant developmental disturbances to fetus = fetal macrosomia (larger than normal baby), hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia or hyperbilirubinemia (build up of bilirubin). -usually disappears after pregnancy; however in many instances it returns years later presence of an enzyme in the placenta and considerable destruction of insulin by the placenta -fasting blood glucose levels are taken (after a 12-14 hr fast) -if range is between 100 and 125 mg/dL=p Continue reading >>

Pbs Unit 2: Diabetes

Pbs Unit 2: Diabetes

most atoms want to complete their outer shell to gain 8 valence electrons connecting of two or more atoms to fill the 8 valence electrons spots when atoms transfer electrons, they become ions and take either a positive or negative charge Sodium loses an electron to become a positive charge Chlorine gains an electron to become a negative charge electrons shared between atoms of same or different elements to form molecules occur when atoms, molecules, or ions interact to make or break bonds energy is stored as potential energy and then released large molecules that (with the exception of lipids) are also polymers A test of the body's ability to metabolize glucose that involves the administration of a measured dose of glucose to the fasting stomach and the determination of blood glucose levels in the blood or urine at intervals thereafter and that is used especially to detect diabetes. As glucose levels increase, insulin levels should... Explain why insulin injections are not the course of treatment for all diabetics. People with Type II diabetes already have enough insulin...they don't need more. Type II diabetics can't do anything with the insulin already produced Explain how lifestyle choices can impact a person's risk for developing diabetes. -Increase risk: Overweight, older, bad diet(high fat, sodium, carb), woman's pregnancy, genetic factors -Decrease risk: exercise, healthy diet, healthy weight. What do you think it means if doctors say that a person is pre-diabetic? The person may be showing symptoms of a diabetic. In the activity, Patient A's glucose levels stayed high for a short amount of time, then dropped(her glucose levels are unstable). Patient A would be an example of being "pre-diabetic". The doctor would say that Patient A would need to change their eat Continue reading >>

Chapter 21: Diabetic Emergencies And Altered Mental Status

Chapter 21: Diabetic Emergencies And Altered Mental Status

Sort Type 1 diabetes Formerly known as insulin-dependent diabetes Occurs when the pancreatic cells fail to function properly and insulin is not secreted normally. They do not have enough insulin in their system to transfer circulating glucose into cells If left untreated, there is too much glucose in the blood, and not enough in the cells. Starving the body of sugar. Typically will be prescribed synthetic insulin to supplement. Signs and symptoms of a diabetic emergency 1. Rapid onset of altered mental status: After missing a meal on a day the pt took prescribed insulin After vomiting a meal on a day the pt took prescribed insulin After an unusual amount of physical exercise or work May occur with no identifiable predisposing factor 2. Intoxicated appearance, staggering, slurred speech, to unconsciousness 3. Cold, clammy skin 4. Elevated heart rate 5. Hunger, thirst 6. Uncharacteristic behavior 7. Anxiety 8. Combativeness 9. Seizures Hypoglycemia signs and symptoms 1. Glucose meter value of less than 60-80 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter) 2. Altered mental status (can be mild) 3. Diaphoretic skin, cool, pale 4. Seizures *Pt's with less than 50 mg/dL reading will typically have a significant altered mental status, and may be unresponsive. Likely unable to safely receive oral glucose *LOW reading indicates blood glucose levels that are extremely low, often less than 15 mg/dL Hyperglycemia signs and symptoms 1. Glucose meter value of over 140 mg/dL 2. Pt's with blood glucose levels over 200-300 mg/dL, especially for a prolonged time may experience dehydration and other more serious symptoms 3. Warm, red and dry skin 4. Acetone breath 5. Deep and rapid breathing 6. Dry mouth, intense thirst, abdominal pain, vomiting *HIGH or HI reading indicates an extremely high glucose le Continue reading >>

Diabetes Test- Biomed

Diabetes Test- Biomed

a unit of heat used to show the amount of energy used to raise a gram of water by 1 C All of the fat contained in a single serving of food lipids that are liquid at room temperature; healthier than saturated fat; used to make cell membranes and insulate neurons, energy source lipids that are solid at room temp; contains single bonds between carbons; raises level of cholesterol "partially hydrogenated oils"; fatty acids; raise bad cholesterol and lowers good; lipid with ringed molecular structure; used in cell membranes in flexibility; used for steroid hormones important mineral and electrolyte; maintaining water balance within cells; needed for proper functioning of nerve and muscles sugars; fiber; cellulose; energy source in the human body indigestible portion of plants; helps food move through digestive system; absorbs water carbohydrate; structural component of living cells and source of energy building blocks of life; needed to repair and maintain body; important for growth and development teeth and bones; sends and receives nerve signals mineral found in ever cell; needed to make hemoglobin and other proteins fat-soluble; used slowly; growth; tooth and bone development; vision; reproduction; healthy skin water-soluble; used quickly; used as an antioxidant; helps absorb iron 1. Why do you think nutritional information is listed per serving and not per package? What are the pros and cons to this method? The information is listed per serving because people should eat the food by serving and not package. Without information listed by serving, consumers would not know how much their eating, and be able to track their daily values. 3. Describe at least one reason for limiting each of the following in a well-balanced diet - saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium. a. Satu Continue reading >>

Unit 2 Bio Med Pbs Flashcards | Quizlet

Unit 2 Bio Med Pbs Flashcards | Quizlet

1. Describe how Glucose Tolerance Testing can be used to diagnose diabetes. If the body absorbs the glucose properly, then the person doesn't have diabetes. If the person isn't receptive to the test, then they have diabetes. 2. Explain why insulin injections are not the course of treatment for all diabetics. Type 1 of diabetes doesn't produce enough insulin, but type 2 produces enough, but the body cannot use it properly. 3. Explain how lifestyle choices can impact a person's risk for developing diabetes. If a person does not have good eating habits, or exercise properly, then they can develop type 2 diabetes. 4. What do you think it means if doctors say that a person is "pre-diabetic"? You have symptoms of diabetes, and could end up with them, but if you eat better and exercise, it can help prevent it. They aren't saying you have diabetes, but that you have a chance of getting it. 5. Using information from this activity, explain the basic relationship between insulin and glucose. Glucose cannot enter the cell without insulin functioning properly as a "key" to unlock the cell. 1. Describe one benefit and one drawback of using models to represent scientific processes. Benefit - allows us to physically see how it is and get a better grasp on it Drawback - it cannot be exact, and if not done correctly, would make us not understand the real thing 2. Give two possible reasons why both engineers and scientists use a design process for their work. 1.) To organize the work, so nothing gets lost 2.) So others can go in and see exactly what you did 3. Describe how you would use/alter your model to demonstrate the basic difference between Type I and Type II diabetes. (Extra credit if you demonstrate it!) For type one have no insulin and have all the glucose on the exterior of the Continue reading >>

2.3.2 Biomed Flashcards | Quizlet

2.3.2 Biomed Flashcards | Quizlet

Explain the role exercise plays in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. Exercise allows cells to get glucose without insulin, helps increase insulin sensitivity, burns the extra glucose that cannot get into the cells, which can help if blood sugar levels are too high. If you exercise too much, blood sugar levels can also drop too low and cause problems. Describe what happened to the model cell that was submerged in a low glucose solution for 20 min. The model cell swells because it is in a hypotonic solution. The water enters the cells to move the glucose out into the solution to create equilibrium. Explain why hospitals use saline solutions to hydrate patients instead of distilled water. It allows for more water to get into the cells. The sodium in the saline solution attracts the sodium in the cell, and replacing the sodium in the cells with water. How does preventing a diabetic emergency affect the day to day life of a diabetic? What special considerations do they have to make as they go about their day. Preventing a diabetic emergency affects the day to day life of a diabetic because they have to be constantly thinking about their symptoms, and how to deal with/prevent those symptoms. The special considerations they have to make is what they eat, how much they exercise, and how much insulin they need. Explain how having an insulin pump may decrease the chance of a diabetic emergency. An insulin pumps works constantly. This allows the diabetic to keep their blood glucose levels in range during meals and at night. The insulin pump decreases the chance of a diabetic emergency because the insulin is always available. It can also makes sure that your blood glucose levels stay in range. Continue reading >>

Biomedical Unit 2 Flashcards | Quizlet

Biomedical Unit 2 Flashcards | Quizlet

How does life with Type 1 diabetes compare to life with Type 2 diabetes? Mention at least three specific comparisons. Type 1 is diagnosed at a young age. Type 2 is not curable. Both can't produce insulin. When a person is diagnosed with diabetes, what changes would one have to make in lifestyle and diet? Eating healthy, checking labels, and tracking what you eat. Describe the importance of checking blood sugar for a diabetic Checking blood sugar is important so you can be updated on your body and if it gets to high. Explain the role that exercise plays in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. Exercise helps with maintaining the body by keeping the balanced amount of insulin to maintain blood sugar levels. Describe what happened to the model cell that was submerged in a low glucose solution for 20 minutes. Explain why this occurs. The model cell got bigger because water came in and moves glucose out. Explain why hospitals use saline solutions to hydrate patients instead of distilled water. How does preventing a diabetic emergency affect the day to day life of a diabetic? What special considerations do they have to make as they go about their day They know something major won't happened. Explain how having an insulin pump may decrease the chance of a diabetic having a diabetic emergency. If the insulin decreased, the pump will prevent having a diabetic emergency. Explain how diabetes can affect two other human body systems. Diabetes can affect the heart, because when glucose levels get too high it could lead to a stroke or a heart disease. Another body system it could affect us the nervous system, because when glucose levels stay high for a long time blood vessel and nerve connection could get damaged. Explain why people with poorly controlled diabetes are at risk for Continue reading >>

Diabetes Flashcards | Quizlet

Diabetes Flashcards | Quizlet

what is the catabolic opposition to insulin? glucagon, it promotes the breakdown of glucose -the pro hormone converted to insulin and C peptide in equimolar amounts -in response to ingestion of food, stored insulin is released first, followed by newly synthesised insulin -gives a Biphasic response of insulin secretion Insulin is produced from the ______________ insulin is produced from the pancreas, and is secreted into ______a)______ and acts first on the _____b)_____ insulin passes through the liver into systemic circulation, acts on what 2 things? what are the principal actions of insulin (quite a long list) -increases glucose uptake in FAT and MUSCLE -inc lipogenesis in ADIPOSE TISSUE (Storage of nutrients) -decreases gluconeogenesis from 3 carbon precursors what 3 carbon precursors could go through gluconeogenesis to form glucose? name the process of glycogen going to glucose are insulin and glucose cons stable throughout the day? glucose levels remain v constant, due to big spikes in insulin levels allowing for the smooth maintenance of blood sugar why is the maintenance of blood glucose within a narrow range of physiological importance? -maintence of energy source for most tissues in type 1 diabetes, there is autoimmune destruction of what? how could secondary diabetes be caused by alcoholism? alcohol destroys the pancreas, may not produce insulin what receptors allow insulin to enter the cell? glut 4 receptors translocate from cytoplasm to cell membrane name some severe insulin resistance syndromes is visceral fat more or less metabolically active than subcutaneous fat? -central adiposity can cause insulin resistance state some of the symptoms of metabolic syndrome name 3 endocrine issues other than diabetes that causes insulin resistance -pheochromocystoma (ne Continue reading >>

2.3 Life With Diabetes

2.3 Life With Diabetes

How does life with Type 1 diabetes compare to life with Type 2 diabetes? 3) both don't produce the right kind/ any insulin When a person is diagnosed with diabetes, what changes would one have to make in lifestyle? When a person is diagnosed with diabetes, what changes would one have to make in diet? Have to have a somewhat strict diet and can't consume as much glucose. Describe the importance of checking blood sugar for a diabetic. To make sure your blood sugar doesn't raise too high. Explain the role that exercise plays in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. You need the proper amount of insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Describe what happened to the model cell that was submerged in a low glucose solution for 20 minutes. The model cell would get bigger because water comes in and moves glucose out. Explain why hospitals use saline solutions to hydrate patients instead of distilled water. How does preventing a diabetic emergency affect the day to day life of a diabetic? What special considerations do they have to make as they go on about their day? Explain how having an insulin pump may decrease the chance of a diabetic having a diabetic emergency? If the insulin decreased, the pump will prevent having a diabetic emergency. Explain how diabetes can affect two other human body systems. 1) Heart: high blood glucose levels lead to complications like heart disease, stroke which leads to death. 2) Nerves: if blood glucose levels stay high for a while, the blood vessels feed the nerves can become damaged. Explain why people with poorly controlled diabetes are at risk for amputation. Because their disease could become so terrible that there's nothing to save it. Example for short term and long term complications of diabetes. short term: hypoglycemia diabetic Continue reading >>

Med Surg: Chapter 49 Diabetes Mellitus

Med Surg: Chapter 49 Diabetes Mellitus

Which statement by a nurse to a patient newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes is correct? a. Insulin is not used to control blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes. b. Complications of type 2 diabetes are less serious than those of type 1 diabetes. c. Changes in diet and exercise may control blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes. d. Type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed when the patient is admitted with a hyperglycemic coma. For some patients with type 2 diabetes, changes in lifestyle are sufficient to achieve blood glucose control. Insulin is frequently used for type 2 diabetes, complications are equally severe as for type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed with routine laboratory testing or after a patient develops complications such as frequent yeast infections. A 48-year-old male patient screened for diabetes at a clinic has a fasting plasma glucose level of 120 mg/dL (6.7 mmol/L). The nurse will plan to teach the patient about c. lifestyle changes to lower blood glucose. d. effects of oral hypoglycemic medications. The patient's impaired fasting glucose indicates prediabetes, and the patient should be counseled about lifestyle changes to prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. The patient with prediabetes does not require insulin or oral hypoglycemics for glucose control and does not need to self-monitor blood glucose. A 28-year-old male patient with type 1 diabetes reports how he manages his exercise and glucose control. Which behavior indicates that the nurse should implement additional teaching? a. The patient always carries hard candies when engaging in exercise. b. The patient goes for a vigorous walk when his glucose is 200 mg/dL. c. The patient has a peanut butter sandwich before going for a bicycle ride. d. The patient increase Continue reading >>

2.3 Life With Diabetes

2.3 Life With Diabetes

3.What might happen to cells that are exposed to high concentrations of sugar? When cells are exposed to high concentrations of sugar the cells will lose water due to the hyperglycemic solution pulling water away from the cells 4.How do Type I and Type II diabetes differ? Type I is when there is no insulin at all, rapid onset caused by beta cells being attacked by body, children / teens usually effected, can only be treated by insulin shots. The Symptoms acute are increased thirst & urination, constant hunger, weight loss, blurred vision and extreme tiredness. The Type II is insulin resistance, obesity, slow onset, can be cured by weight loss, adults / elderly recently kids. The Symptoms acute are Feeling tired or ill, frequent urination (especially at night), unusual thirst, weight loss, blurred vision, frequent infections and slow wound healing. 5.What are the current treatments for Type I and Type II diabetes? The current treatments for type I diabetes is the insulin pump, insulin shots, diabetic diet, exercise and the Type II treatments are oral medicines, weight loss, diabetic diet , exercise. 6.What is the importance of checking blood sugar levels for a diabetic? The importance of checking blood sugar levels are to maintain a 70 - 120 BS levels. A normal BS range prevents medical emergencies, minimize long term complications This could make someone a happier person. 7.How can an insulin pump help a diabetic? An insulin pump could help a diabetic with their emotions, decrease burden, prevent self harm and help them have a more 'normal' life. Continuous BS level monitoring,regulation of insulin mimics homeostasis, insulin on demand,and easier to maintain 70 - 120 BS level.This could result in being emotionally more stable. 8.What are potential short and long term c Continue reading >>

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