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How Does Preventing A Diabetic Emergency Affect The Day To Day Life Of A Diabetic

How Being Diagnosed With Diabetes Changed My Life

How Being Diagnosed With Diabetes Changed My Life

Charlotte Lightman was diagnosed with diabetes as a child ( Diabetes UK ) How being diagnosed with diabetes changed my life "Havingdiabetes can be complicated but with the right support and understanding it doesnt need to stop you from doing the things you love." I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes 20 years ago, when I was 7 years old. Type 1 diabetes is an invisible disease. To look at me you wouldnt know there was anything wrong. But living with the condition is a 24/7 thing. It has completely changed my life and, in different ways, affects every aspect of what I do. Well tell you whats true. You can form your own view. From 15p 0.18 $0.18 USD 0.27 a day, more exclusives, analysis and extras. Every time I eat, I need to think about how it is going to affect my sugar levels. As I have Type 1 diabetes, my pancreas cannot produce insulin and I need to inject myself with the hormone, usually five times daily, and attempt to replicate the work of the organ. Carbohydrates increase my blood sugar level, so every snack and meal is a maths challenge, requiring me to calculate how much insulin I need to inject to counteract the spike in my blood sugars. I love running and going to the gym, but this also affects my diabetes as too much exercise can make my blood sugar levels go dangerously low, whilecertain typescan cause them to spike too high. I constantly need to check my sugars and adjust my insulin intake no two days are the same! Exercise is good for me but it's certainly not a simple and straightforward endeavour. Charlotte loves to run, but her diabetes can make it difficult I have to constantly tell people that I didnt get diabetes from eating sugar Diabetes has a bad reputation and it is often the subject of jokes. I have found that most people dont understand the di Continue reading >>

Pbs 2.3.2 Flashcards | Quizlet

Pbs 2.3.2 Flashcards | Quizlet

Activity 2.3.2 - Explain the role that exercise plays in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. The role that exercise plays in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels are that exercise burns the energy from glucose in the body, which lowers the blood sugar, and can help if blood sugar levels are too high. If you exercise too hard or for too long, however, blood sugar levels can also drop too low and cause complications as well. Therefore, one should always have an healthy amount, not too much or too little. Activity 2.3.2 - Describe what happened to the model cell that was submerged in a low glucose solution for 20 minutes. Explain why this occurs. In the model cell that was submerged in a low glucose solution for 20 minutes, would become bigger and swell up because as water comes in the glucose dilutes and goes out. Activity 2.3.2 - Explain why hospitals use saline solutions to hydrate patients instead of distilled water. Hospitals use saline solutions to hydrate patients instead of distilled water because saline solution replenished the body with nutrients, such as sodium as well as water, which is needed for muscles and nerves to work properly. In dehydration, the patient has usually lost salt as well as water, so the saline fully hydrates them and gives their body the salt it needs. Activity 2.3.2 - How does preventing a diabetic emergency affect the day to day life of a diabetic? What special considerations do they have to make as they go about their day. Preventing a diabetic emergency affect the day to day life of a diabetic because they know that their blood glucose levels are normal and that they wouldn't be in a critical condition. Special considerations they have to make as they go about their day is maintaining their diet so that they are eating a diet tha Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies

Diabetic Emergencies

Tweet Diabetes can become serious in the short term if blood sugar levels become either too high or too low. The following information details what to do in an emergency. This covers low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), very high blood sugar (diabetic ketoacidosis) and what to do if you are left without your diabetes medication and/or supplies. What counts as a diabetic emergency? It can be a difficult area sometimes to know what counts as a genuine emergency. News reports in recent years have highlighted that a significant number of ‘999’ ambulance call-outs have not been necessary - for example to treat mild hypoglycemia which, in some cases, has been successfully treated befor e the ambulance has arrived. This isn’t to say that conditions, such as hypoglycemia, are not dangerous but that it’s important to know when a situation really is an emergency so that an ambulance is not unnecessarily called. When should I call an ambulance? An ambulance will be needed if someone has either very high or very low blood sugar levels that presents an immediate danger and neither they nor anyone around is confidently able to treat them. Ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome are both life threatening conditions. Hypoglycemia can also be life threatening in some cases. Someone with diabetes that is unconscious is one of the situations in which you should call for an ambulance. If you have doubts about whether the situation is serious enough to warrant an ambulance, call 111. Severe hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia can become dangerous if it is not treated quickly, particularly if it is a result of an insulin overdose. Severe hypoglycemia is generally recognised as hypoglycemia involving: Convulsions (fitting) Unconsciousness Hypoglycemia can often be treated at Continue reading >>

Diabetes - When You Are Sick

Diabetes - When You Are Sick

Check your blood sugar more often than usual (every 2 to 4 hours). Try to keep your blood sugar at less than 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L). There may be times when you need to check your blood sugar every hour. Write down all your blood sugar levels, the time of each test, and the medicines you have taken. If you have type 1 diabetes, check your urine ketones every time you urinate. Eat small meals often. Even if you are not eating as much, your blood sugar can still get very high. If you use insulin, you may even need extra insulin injections. DO NOT do vigorous exercise when you are sick. If you take insulin, you should also have a glucagon emergency treatment kit prescribed by your doctor. Always have this kit available. Drink plenty of sugar-free fluids to keep your body from getting dried out (dehydrated). Drink at least twelve 8-ounce (oz) cups (3 liters) of fluid a day. Fluids you can drink if you are dehydrated include: Water Club soda Diet soda (caffeine-free) Tomato juice Chicken broth If your blood sugar is less than 100 mg/dL (5.5 mmol/L) or falling quickly, it is OK to drink fluids that have sugar in them. Try to check their effect on your blood sugar in the same way you check how other foods affect your blood sugar. Fluids you can drink if your blood sugar is low include: Apple juice Orange juice Grapefruit juice Gatorade or other sports drink Tea with honey Lemon-lime drinks Ginger ale If you throw up, DO NOT drink or eat anything for 1 hour. Rest, but DO NOT lie flat. After 1 hour, take sips of soda, such as ginger ale, every 10 minutes. If vomiting persists call or see your provider. When you have an upset stomach, try to eat small meals. Try carbohydrates, such as: Bagels or bread Cooked cereal Mashed potatoes Noodle or rice soup Saltines Gelatin (such as Je Continue reading >>

Describe What Happened To The Model Cell That Was

Describe What Happened To The Model Cell That Was

Describe what happened to the model cell that was submerged in a low glucose Describe what happened to the model cell that was This preview shows page 2 - 3 out of 3 pages. 2.Describe what happened to the model cell that was submerged in a low glucose solutionfor 20 minutes. Explain why this occurs.3.Explain why hospitals use saline solutions to hydrate patients instead of distilled water.4.How does preventing a diabetic emergency affect the day to day life of a diabetic? What special considerations do they have to make as they go about their day? A diabetic has to pay attention to their sugar and starch intake, and has to monitor their blood sugar levels after each time they eat. Diabetics cant just eat whatever they want, whenever they want, they have to be be very cautious and eat foods that wont cause their blood sugar to go up. Some diabetics have to take insulin shots, this also affects the day to day life of some diabetic.5.Explain how having an insulin pump may decrease the chance of a diabetic having a diabetic emergency. Continue reading >>

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2)

A A A Are There Home Remedies (Diet, Exercise, and Glucose Monitoring) for Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition characterized by the body's inability to regulate glucose (sugar) levels in blood. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes can produce insulin, but the body is not able to use the insulin effectively. The cause of type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune reaction. Combinations of genetic risk factors and unhealthy lifestyle choices cause type 2 diabetes. The main diagnostic test for diabetes is measurement of the blood glucose level. Changes in lifestyle and diet may be adequate to control some cases of type 2 diabetes. Others with type 2 diabetes require medications. Insulin is essential treatment for type 1 diabetes. No effective approach yet exists to prevent type 1 diabetes. Prevention of type 2 diabetes can be accomplished in some cases by maintaining a healthy weight, exercising, sustaining a healthy lifestyle. Prediabetes is a condition that can occur before development of type 2 diabetes. Complications of any type of diabetes include damage to blood vessels, leading to heart disease or kidney disease. Damage to blood vessels in the eye can result in vision problems including blindness. Nerve damage can occur, leading to diabetic neuropathy. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a set of related diseases in which the body cannot regulate the amount of sugar (specifically, glucose) in the blood. The blood delivers glucose to provide the body with energy to perform all daily activities. The liver converts the food a person eats into glucose. The glucose is then released into the bloodstream from the liver between meals. In a healthy person, several hormones tightly regulate the blood glucose level, primarily insulin. Insulin is Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Preventing High Blood Sugar Emergencies

Diabetes: Preventing High Blood Sugar Emergencies

High blood sugar in diabetes occurs when the sugar (glucose) level in the blood rises above normal. It is also called hyperglycemia. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar may be caused by not getting enough insulin or missing your diabetes medicine. It may also be caused by eating too much food, skipping exercise, or being ill or stressed. Unlike low blood sugar, high blood sugar usually happens slowly over hours or days. Blood sugar levels above your target range may make you feel tired and thirsty. If your blood sugar keeps rising, your kidneys will make more urine and you can get dehydrated. Signs of dehydration include being thirstier than usual and having darker urine than usual. Without treatment, severe dehydration can be life-threatening. Over time, high blood sugar can damage the eyes, heart, kidneys, blood vessels, and nerves. Watch for symptoms of high blood sugar. Symptoms include feeling very tired or thirsty and urinating more often than usual. As long as you notice the symptoms, you will probably have time to treat high blood sugar so that you can prevent an emergency. Three things can help you prevent high blood sugar problems: Test your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or not following your normal routine. Testing lets you see when your blood sugar is above your target range, even if you don't have symptoms. Then you can treat it early. Call your doctor if you often have high blood sugar or your blood sugar is often above your target range. Your medicine may need to be adjusted or changed. Drink extra water or drinks that don't have caffeine or sugar to prevent dehydration. Treat infections early Infections that aren't treated (such as urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and skin infections) can raise your risk for a high blood sugar em Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes management requires awareness. Know what makes your blood sugar level rise and fall — And how to control these day-to-day factors. Keeping your blood sugar levels within the range recommended by your doctor can be challenging. That's because many things make your blood sugar levels change, sometimes unexpectedly. Following are some factors that can affect your blood sugar levels. Food Healthy eating is a cornerstone of healthy living — with or without diabetes. But if you have diabetes, you need to know how foods affect your blood sugar levels. It's not only the type of food you eat but also how much you eat and the combinations of food types you eat. What to do: Learn about carbohydrate counting and portion sizes. A key to many diabetes management plans is learning how to count carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the foods that often have the biggest impact on your blood sugar levels. And for people taking mealtime insulin, it's crucial to know the amount of carbohydrates in your food, so you get the proper insulin dose. Learn what portion size is appropriate for each type of food. Simplify your meal planning by writing down portions for the foods you eat often. Use measuring cups or a scale to ensure proper portion size and an accurate carbohydrate count. Make every meal well-balanced. As much as possible, plan for every meal to have a good mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins and fats. It's especially important to pay attention to the types of carbohydrates you choose. Some carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, are better for you than are others. These foods are low in carbohydrates and contain fiber that helps keep your blood sugar levels more stable. Talk to your doctor, nurse or dietitian about the best food choices and Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And What To Do

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And What To Do

Diabetes symptoms can quickly turn into emergencies. The disease of diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2010, claiming nearly 70,000 lives. Responding promptly to symptoms of a diabetic emergency can be lifesaving. Causes and types Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes inhibit the body's ability to manage blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes does so by destroying the cells that produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes reduces how responsive the body is to insulin, while not enough insulin is produced to counter the sugar in the body. Hence, most diabetic emergencies are related to disruptions in a person's blood sugar levels. Occasionally, even too much of a drug being used to treat diabetes can trigger a diabetic emergency. The most common diabetic emergencies include the following: Severe hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is when blood sugar levels are abnormally low. When blood sugar dips very low, it becomes a medical emergency. Hypoglycemia normally only occurs in people with diabetes who take medication that lowers blood sugar. Blood sugar levels may drop dangerously low when a person is: consuming too much alcohol exercising, especially without adjusting food intake or insulin dosage missing or delaying meals overdosing on diabetic medication Diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body does not have enough insulin to break down glucose properly, and hormones that normally work opposite insulin are high. Over time, the body releases hormones that break down fat to provide fuel. This produces acids called ketones. As ketones build up in the body, ketoacidosis can occur. Common causes of ketoacidosis include: uncontrolled or untreated diabetes an illness or infection that changes hormone production an illness or infection that chang Continue reading >>

Avoiding Diabetic Emergencies

Avoiding Diabetic Emergencies

Good diabetes management can prevent ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar coma, and blood sugar levels that are too low or too high. Medically Reviewed by Pat F. Bass III, MD, MPH People who have type 1 diabetes a failure to produce insulin or type 2 diabetes an inability to properly use insulin are at risk for diabetic-related emergencies such as ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar coma, and severe hypoglycemia. These represent potentially life-threatening situations. However, by learning what causes these problems and how to spot them early, you can lessen your risk of these emergencies. This condition, also known as low blood sugar, can occur in anyone who has diabetes, even if you're managing your diabetes correctly. Severe hypoglycemia can cause a whole host of symptoms, such as: Confusion and difficulty paying attention Sudden moodiness, such as crying for no obvious reason The only way to know for sure if you've got severe hypoglycemia is a blood glucose test . The fastest way to treat severe hypoglycemia is with some type of sugar, such as glucose tablets, fruit juice, or hard candy. Preventing severe hypoglycemia requires good diabetes control and learning to recognize the symptoms so that you can treat it before it's at an emergency level. Excessively high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, can also occur in anyone who has diabetes. Eating too much or even stress can bring on hyperglycemia. Symptoms may include: Your best prevention technique is to keep up good diabetes management practices. Ketoacidosis is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. It is a serious condition caused by high levels of ketones and can lead to diabetic coma. Ketones are acids produced when your body uses fats instead of sugar for energy because of a lack of insulin or the inability of your body to use Continue reading >>

Quick And Dirty Guide To Diabetic Emergencies

Quick And Dirty Guide To Diabetic Emergencies

Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Mellitus is a systemic disease of the endocrine system resulting from the insufficiency/dysfunction of the pancreas. It is a complex disorder of fat, carbohydrates, and protein metabolism. Diabetes mellitus is potentially lethal, putting the patient at risk for several types of medical emergencies. It is characterized by a lack of insulin, or a persons inability to use insulin. In order to properly manage the numerous calls for diabetics, it is important for EMS professionals to have a basic knowledge of diabetes (DM) before dealing with the associated emergencies that may arise as a result of the disease. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the US, as well as, it is estimated that 5 + million US citizens become diabetic annually and don't realize they have the disease until an emergency arises. To truly understand the signs and symptoms of the various related conditions, we must first, comprehend some basic pathophysiology. The primary energy fuel for cells is glucose. Glucose is a simple sugar that accounts for approximately 95 percent of the sugar in the bloodstream after gastrointestinal absorption. Thus, it is the blood glucose level that EMS and other health care practitioners are most interested in determining. The key function of insulin (A hormone secreted by the beta cells in the pancreas) is to move glucose from the blood into the cells, where it can be used for energy. However, insulin does not directly carry glucose into the cell, it triggers a receptor on the plasma membrane to open a channel allowing a protein helper (through the process of facilitated diffusion), to carry the glucose molecule into the cell. As long as any insulin is available in the blood, is active, is effective, and is able to stimulate the rece Continue reading >>

How Does Preventing A Diabetic Emergency Affect The Day To Day Life Of A Diabetic? | Yahoo Answers

How Does Preventing A Diabetic Emergency Affect The Day To Day Life Of A Diabetic? | Yahoo Answers

How does preventing a diabetic emergency affect the day to day life of a diabetic? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: They get to live if they prevent a hypoglycemic episode which really isn't the direct result of diabetes but it's when too much insulin and or medication was applied for their meals and activities. Source(s): Reverse Diabetes Without Drugs : Source(s): Secrets To Reverse Diabetes : I'm a 45 year old woman and was recently diagnosed as being a borderline diabetic. My doctor prescribed some medication, but before filling it I decided to do some research on the internet which led me to the methods. After reading this ebook and applying the methods, my scepticism turned to 100% belief. I noticed that my energy levels increased significantly and I felt more rested in the morning, my symptoms started going away. I am very happy to tell you that I have been feeling better than I have felt in years and my doctor informed me that he will be taking me off my prescriptions if I keep this up. I recommend you use the Type 2 Diabetes Destroyer to naturally reverse your diabetes. You are more likely to remain conscious and maintain cognitive (thought processing) abilities. Blood sugar (glucose) levels that are either too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia) can lead to loss of consciousness. Both processes can lead to a lack of cognition (processing thoughts), though this is more noticeable in cases of hypoglycemia. Long-term hyperglycemia can lead to the development of diabetic complications, some of which can be a real pain ... literally; some that can prove embarrassing; and some that can even be lethal. All the time blood sugar levels are higher than the 'normal' range, damage is slowly being done to the internal organs, blood vess Continue reading >>

2.3.2 Biomed Flashcards | Quizlet

2.3.2 Biomed Flashcards | Quizlet

Explain the role exercise plays in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. Exercise allows cells to get glucose without insulin, helps increase insulin sensitivity, burns the extra glucose that cannot get into the cells, which can help if blood sugar levels are too high. If you exercise too much, blood sugar levels can also drop too low and cause problems. Describe what happened to the model cell that was submerged in a low glucose solution for 20 min. The model cell swells because it is in a hypotonic solution. The water enters the cells to move the glucose out into the solution to create equilibrium. Explain why hospitals use saline solutions to hydrate patients instead of distilled water. It allows for more water to get into the cells. The sodium in the saline solution attracts the sodium in the cell, and replacing the sodium in the cells with water. How does preventing a diabetic emergency affect the day to day life of a diabetic? What special considerations do they have to make as they go about their day. Preventing a diabetic emergency affects the day to day life of a diabetic because they have to be constantly thinking about their symptoms, and how to deal with/prevent those symptoms. The special considerations they have to make is what they eat, how much they exercise, and how much insulin they need. Explain how having an insulin pump may decrease the chance of a diabetic emergency. An insulin pumps works constantly. This allows the diabetic to keep their blood glucose levels in range during meals and at night. The insulin pump decreases the chance of a diabetic emergency because the insulin is always available. It can also makes sure that your blood glucose levels stay in range. Continue reading >>

How Does Preventing A Diabetic Emergency Affect The Day Today Life Of A Diabetic? What Special Considerations Do They Have To Make As They Go About Their Day?

How Does Preventing A Diabetic Emergency Affect The Day Today Life Of A Diabetic? What Special Considerations Do They Have To Make As They Go About Their Day?

My daddy's a diabetic. He prevents a diabetic emergency by making sure he takes his medicines daily and he checks his glucose a lot. It's hard because every day, his glucose changes so he has to change what he eats and does. When his glucose is t too low he has little to no energy and wants to sleep. We can't let him sleep until his glucose is in a healthy range. If it's too high, he gets really thirsty and has to use the bathroom a lot. They have to make sure they don't eat a lot of carbohydrates, sugar, and unhealthy fats. On a day-to-day basis, he has to plan his food around a certain number of carbs and fats. They also need to make sure they get in some types of exercise a day. They also need to watch their glucose closely while they exercise. Being a diabetic is very hard but with proper education and a good diet, it can be manageable. My daddy took a diabetic healthy food class at hospital to help him learn how food affects his body and how to make healthier choices. He also works closely with his doctor who helps him with his medicines. From day to day , you never know what to expect so you have to be careful and watch your diet and exercise plus how much water you drink. Continue reading >>

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