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How Do You Use A Novolog Flexpen?

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This video shows you how to pronounce Novolog Mix 70-30

Novolog® Instructions For Use

NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Contraindications NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is recommended for all patients with diabetes and is particularly important for patients using external pump infusion th Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Richknowbody

    The correct timing for taking your insulin prior to eating?

    Does anybody know the correct timing? My doctor says about 10 minutes prior to eating.
    I know if I have the pump deliver the insulin and eat right away, towards the end of the meal, I have a few bites that are really delicious.

  2. MsKelly50

    I take my insluin 20 to 30 minutes prior to eating any meal. I'm not on a pump, so I'm not sure if this would apply as well. Various doctors as well as family members have told me no more than 30 minutes before a meal so that your BS doesn't drop dangerously. Good luck!

  3. Uncle Lew

    The correct timing depends on the type of insulin you are using. I use a rapid acting insulin (Novolog). I take it 10-15 minutes before eating. This way when my food starts to digest and enters my blood stream (takes about 20 minutes) the insulin is already acting to control my blood glucose. Look in the insert that comes in the package with your insulin. Its the best guide. Or talk to your doctor as he/she will knowm what the best will be for you.
    Godspeed. :-)

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Some days it is SO HARD to get yourself motivated to exercise because well, you just don't feel like it! You're unmotivated, dreading it, and hating life but you know you need to work out. Sometimes I feel like this when I am on my period. No worries though, it's normal, and I feel ya. In this video, I am sharing with you my 5 tips for getting pumped to work out. Remember that YOU have all the control! Just tell yourself you can do this...and you will! This video was sponsored by Playtex Sport :) Get all my workout calendars and read my blog: http://www.blogilates.com Get the Blogilates App FREE in the App Store or Google Play Store! MY ACTIVEWEAR: http://www.popflexactive.com INSTAGRAM: @Blogilates SNAPCHAT: @Blogilates FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/blogilates TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/blogilates ****** Cassey Ho is an award-winning fitness instructor, entrepreneur and online personality. She is the creator of Blogilates, the #1 female fitness channel on Youtube. In a revolutionary partnership, Cassey's unique format, POP Pilates which launched on Youtube in 2009, has become a live class that can be taken at every 24 Hr Fitness gym in the US. She's the author of the best-selling book, Hot Body Year Round and is the designer of her own activewear line, POPFLEX Active. *** DISCLAIMER: Blogilates and oGorgeous Inc. strongly recommend that you consult with your physician before beginning any exercise program. You should be in good physical condition and be able to participate in the exercise. You should understand that when participating in any exercise or exercise program, there is the possibility of physical injury. If you engage in this exercise or exercise program, you agree that you do so at your own risk, are voluntarily participating in these activities, assume all risk of injury to yourself, and agree to release and discharge Blogilates and oGorgeous Inc. from any and all claims or causes of action, known or unknown, arising out of Blogilates' and oGorgeous Inc.'s negligence.

Self-improvement: How Can I Motivate Myself To Work Hard?

Going anonymous because I will be sharing a lots of personal stuff!! Introduction: I am 30 years of age, male & work for an IT company. Background - I come from a lower class family. I have seen times when my father did not have money to feed us. I have seen people standing at our door, shouting at my father to return the money he had borrowed from them. I have been working since I was 17. My school fee was paid through some NGO. I had to literally go and stand at some senior person’s door for hours to get his signature on my “Scholarship Form”. At time I have slept hungry to save some money. I have spent countless nights because of pain in my teeth, have lost two of them now. Never had money to get them treated. I started off as a sales boy in a clothes showroom. I never went to a college after my 12th standard. I used to work through out the year, and only could took out time for appearing for my exams. This is how I completed my graduation in commerce. I walked straight 10 kms to appear for my first interview, had boils at the end of this journey. Fortunately, cleared the interview and things started changing for me. Gradually I have made progress in my career, so much so Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Jean and Charcoal

    Hi Everyone,
    My vet told me I could give B-12 once a week to my old girl, Ketchie, who is 17. When I had her to the vet's a week and a half ago, my vet gave Ketchie fluids, and she drew up the B-12 into a syringe that was marked with ml's. I have some 100 unit diabetic syringes, and wondered if anyone knows how many units would I draw into that syringe to equal .2ml's ?
    Thanks, if anyone can help me out here. I have hunted on the internet, but can't seem to find a conversion chart for that.
    Jean and Charcoal (GA)

  2. squeem3

    Re: Giving B-12 in 100 unit Insulin Syringe, how much is .2
    Jean and Charcoal said:
    . I have some 100 unit diabetic syringes, and wondered if anyone knows how many units would I draw into that syringe to equal .2ml's ?
    Measure to the 20 unit line for 0.2 ml.
    1 ml (1 cc) = 100 units
    0.5 ml (1/2 cc) = 50 units
    0.1 ml = 10 units
    0.01 ml = 1 unit

  3. Jean and Charcoal

    Re: Giving B-12 in 100 unit Insulin Syringe, how much is .2
    Thanks so much!!!
    Also, I finally found a site with the info, just now, in case anyone needs to see the conversion chart:
    http://www.petplace.com/dogs/how-to-convert-u-100-insulin-to-milliliters/page1.aspx

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Using Novolog® Flexpen®

Here is a quick guide to NovoLog® dosing using NovoLog® FlexPen®. Please read the full Instructions For Use that came with your FlexPen® carefully before using it. To see FlexPen® in action, watch the video below. FlexPen® Demo Video (7:05 min) This video shows you how to use your NovoLog® FlexPen®. NovoLog® FlexPen® should not be used by people who are blind or have severe visual problems without the help of a person who has good eyesight and who is trained to use NovoLog® FlexPen® the right way. Wash your hands. Check the label to make sure that you are using the right type of insulin. This is especially important if you take more than 1 type of insulin Pull off the pen cap. Wipe the rubber stopper with an alcohol swab Remove the protective tab from the needle and screw it onto your FlexPen® tightly. It is important that the needle is placed on straight Never place a disposable needle on your FlexPen® until you are ready to take your injection Pull off the big outer needle cap and then pull off the inner needle cap. Throw away the inner needle cap right away Always use a new needle for each injection Be careful not to bend or damage the needle before use To reduce t Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. AlexB

    I'm still pretty new to this and I want to understand all about it. I've got no one my age to talk about it with, so here I am. I've had food and not taken insulin before and felt fine, is it the same as when you take insulin and don't eat anything?
    Also what do I do if my sugar levels are up high?

  2. Diabeticliberty

    Alex it depends on what and when you last ate. It also depends on when you take your insulin and what your blood sugar levels are when you take your insulin. Taking insulin, particularly fast acting insulin can and probably is quite dangerous although without knowing more about your own conditions and management regime this is a general statement only. The one thing I would add is feeling fine and actually being fine can be and all too frequently are a million miles apart from each other. Without regular blood testing, regular food and regular medication with the greatest of respect you may feel relatively OK short term but this is not a long term solution to a condition which you will have to endure for the rest of your life.
    To answer your question directly short term high blood sugars may make you feel tired and lethargic and thirsty and irritable and generally just crappy. It can make you more susceptible to minor infections which will take longer to recover from. Mid to long term high blood sugars can lead to loss of sensation in your toes and fingers. It can affect your eyesight with an unpleasant condition known as retinopothy. It can lead to loss of libido and loss of limbs. Heart attacks, strokes and premature death. There are many other complications which uncontrolled diabetes can and does contribute to. I do not write these things to shock or frighten you but you should be fully aware of some of the potential consequences of poor control. Please look after yourself because the fact is it is you and you alone that poor control will adversely affect.

  3. Annette

    AlexB said: ↑
    is it the same as when you take insulin and don't eat anything? No. It most certainly is not. Not taking insulin with food leads to you running high, even if you feel fine. (Of course, that depends on what food you ate. No carbs - you dont need insulin for, so that would have no effect.)
    No food after taking insulin will lead to a low blood sugar (of course, how low depends on how high you were before you gave your insulin). A low blood sugar does not, generally leave you feeling fine, it leaves you feeling like sh!t. Unless you have no hypo symptoms, in which case, it leaves you out cold.
    I'm not trying to scare you. I am just urging you not to ever take insulin and then not eat.
    (If your sugar levels are high, then you can take a correction dose. You need to discuss this with your nurse or doctor before you even start trying it.)

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