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How Do You Shower With An Insulin Pump

Naked Shower.

Naked Shower.

“Oh, here we go again,” You’re probably thinking. “Crazy Lady and her TMI. EVERYBODY takes a shower naked!” But that’s where you’d be horribly and irrefutably wrong. NOT everybody gets to be naked in the shower. My readers with type 1 diabetes on insulin pumps and /or CGMSs know this all too well. So getting back to my point, I took a Naked Shower today and it was AMAZING. A Naked Shower, by my definition, is a shower in which you are completely naked and unattached to any medical device AND with no medical device accessory stuck to your body. I have had type 1 diabetes for 35 years and for the last 15 years have worn an insulin pump. For the last ten years I’ve worn an insulin pump AND a Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS). These items are stuck to or attached to my body nearly every moment of every single day. Once in a great while, there exists a day when my CGMS sensor dies at the same time my insulin pump runs out of insulin AND I need to get in the shower. It is a magical serendipitous event that occurs rarely (maybe two to three times a year) and means that I get to remove the sticking-out sticky accoutrements of both devices and be utterly and completely naked in the shower. It is a wondrous thing that I can’t explain. To be able to scrub clean every service without worrying about dislodging something from its designated location – well, it’s a freedom those without T1D probably can’t understand. Today, as I scrubbed, I thought about the illusive Naked Shower and how while these devices can be a burden, they also make life with T1D so much more livable – both literally and figuratively. I suppose it’s a love/hate relationship, but one I feel privileged to be alive to be part of. Yesterday, coincidentally, was a banner day in t Continue reading >>

Shower Pak™ Plastic Pouch, Single-use, For Showering With All Insulin Pump Models

Shower Pak™ Plastic Pouch, Single-use, For Showering With All Insulin Pump Models

Pack(age) of 30 EA Item # MN117 HCPCS Code: E1399 Manufacturer: MINIMED DISTRIBUTION CENT Mini-Med Distribution Center Shower Pak™ Plastic Pouch, Single-use, For Showering with all Insulin Pump Models Plastic Shower Bags wear around neck or hang on the shower head, to hold pump or CGMS while showering. designed so you can shower with your insulin pump or continuous glucose monitoring system. Continue reading >>

How To Have Sex With An Insulin Pump.

How To Have Sex With An Insulin Pump.

Don’t. For the love of god, do not have sex with your insulin pump. It’s an expensive insulin delivery device, and it’s not to be trifled with. But if the Google search you made was to find out how to have sex with the insulin pump in the vicinity, then that’s a whole different take. Because that topic comes up a lot in the women’s discussion groups that I’ve taken part in, and it was a particularly hot topic at the Diabetes Sisters conference earlier this month. The same sorts of questions come up every time, from new pumpers and people considering adding a diabetes device to their management plan: “How do you deal with wearing a device when you’re trying to be, like, naked?” “Do you disconnect during intimacy?” “Does it get in the way, physically?” “Does it get in the way, emotionally?” (And, for the record, I love that these questions get asked. And the best part is, they’re asked in rooms full of women who have either met for the first time that day or haven’t even formally met yet. Diabetes, for all its chaos, does bring a certain level of discussion comfort and camaraderie, and I love that. Love.) “How do you deal with wearing a device when you’re trying to be, like, naked?” This was a tough hurdle for me, because I went so long without wearing any devices. Diagnosed as a kid and not pumping until 2004 or CGM’ing until 2006, I spent a big part of my diabetes life without any external “symptoms,” so to speak. Initially, I needed to be comfortable with my device(s) before I could expect anyone else to be, and that did take some time. But I like the “no big deal” philosophy to these moments. If I give the impression that these devices aren’t a big deal and should be taken as a small part of the bigger whole, then I Continue reading >>

4 Faqs About Water Activities

4 Faqs About Water Activities

We’ve been talking a lot this summer about summer vacations, repelling down waterfalls and preventing moisture damage to your pump. Today, we welcome back Amy Kellerman, a product specialist on our insulin delivery marketing team, to continue on that theme to talk about what to do with your pump and CGM for different water situations. It’s that time of year when we all want to get out of the summer heat and go for a refreshing swim. However, you might be wondering what you can and can’t do with your insulin pump and CGM in water situations. While manufacturers design insulin pumps to be sturdy (Medtronic pumps are actually made from the same material as motorcycle helmets!), any durable pump can develop tiny cracks that make it susceptible to water damage. Often you can’t even see these micro-cracks, but they’re there thanks to all those little bumps and drops that come with living with your pump every day. That’s why we make our pumps water resistant, meaning they can withstand rain or accidental splashes, but you should avoid submerging your pump in water. So, what does that mean for your daily life? Check out answers to some of your most frequently asked questions on water activities. What do I do with my pump when I take a shower? Hopefully, this is your most common water activity :-). As you probably already know, just disconnect the pump and belt out your favorite shower song without worrying about possible water damage due to micro-cracks (or trying to find a place to put your pump). What should I do with my pump when I go swimming? Since your Medtronic pump is splash proof, but not waterproof, you don’t want to submerge it in water. If you are going to swim, surf, snorkel or enjoy any other water activity, disconnect from your insulin pump for up t Continue reading >>

Summer-friendly Tandem Pump Features

Summer-friendly Tandem Pump Features

As the weather gets warmer we wanted to be sure to remind you that Tandem insulin pumps have some great features that will help protect you from the elements! Temperature Sensor Tandem insulin pumps are the only pumps with a temperature sensor that will warn you when the temperature inside the pump has reached a level that may have compromised the insulin in the cartridge. Here are some key points about this feature: If your pump detects a temperature outside of the normal operating range – below 35˚F (2˚C) or above 113˚F (45˚C) – the Temperature Alarm occurs, protecting you from continuing to deliver insulin that may have lost its potency. The alarm will sound and insulin delivery will be stopped. At this point, please consult your insulin manufacturer for advice. When the alarm sounds, the pump needs to be removed from the heat source before insulin delivery can be resumed. You should replace the cartridge and insulin as soon as possible. This feature was designed to protect you from receiving affected insulin. Your Tandem Pump hardware has been tested to operate in a wide range of temperatures from -4°F to 140°F so even when the temperature alarm is triggered, your pump is not in danger. Watertight (IPX7) Tandem pumps are watertight (IPX 7), tested to a depth of three feet for up to 30 minutes. Users can have peace of mind knowing that their pump is safe in the event of accidental submersion. However, we do not recommend users shower, bathe or swim with their pump. When you disconnect be sure to place it in a secure, cool area. Additional reading: Learn more about how to protect your gear as weather gets colder in this post on the Tandem blog. From time to time, we may pass along: suggestions, tips, or information about other Tandem Insulin Pump user experi Continue reading >>

In The Water With An Insulin Pump

In The Water With An Insulin Pump

Insulin pump therapy doesn’t have to get in the way of everyday life—even when it comes to swimming, showering, or getting caught in the rain. At Animas, we know that “life happens” so we designed all of our pumps to be waterproof from the very beginning. So go ahead: jump in the pool, run through the sprinklers, or just get wet! Getting wet without the worry Animas® Vibe® and OneTouch Ping® insulin pumps* are waterproof at 3.6 m (12 feet) for 24 hours. So, even "overboard," your pump can still keep pumping. Swimming and bathing To wear your Animas insulin pump while swimming, simply clip it to your swimwear or place it in a small sport case designed to hold your pump. If you want to keep the pump connected in the shower or tub, you can place it in the soap dish or leave it at the bottom of the tub. Whatever works for you! Note: Do not wear your Animas insulin pump scuba diving or in water at depths greater than 3.6 m (12 feet). Hot tubs, whirlpools and saunas Be sure to remove your pump, infusion set and tubing prior to using hot tubs, whirlpools or saunas. Exposure to extreme temperatures could affect the quality of the insulin inside the pump and infusion set. *The OneTouch Ping® meter-remote must not be exposed to water. The information made available on the Animas website is not intended to be used or viewed as a substitute for consultation with a healthcare professional. The information provided on this site cannot be the basis for diagnosis or therapy. You are advised to obtain professional advice and should always discuss your treatment plan with your healthcare team. Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump: What To Know Before You Disconnect

Insulin Pump: What To Know Before You Disconnect

Many infusion sets have a “disconnect” feature that allows you to temporarily unhook the pump and tubing for situations such as bathing, sports, swimming, intimacy, and when undergoing medical tests (such as x-rays, computed tomography (CT scans), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)). Your diabetes care team will guide you on what to do when you need to disconnect from an insulin pump. You may need to check your blood sugar levels before, during, and after disconnection. When you use an insulin pump, there is only short acting insulin infused in the pump. Once you're disconnected from the pump, you need to be extra careful and monitor your blood sugars many times during that period of time. This is so that you can detect unusually high blood glucose and avoid diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA), which can happen if there is prolonged insulin infusion interruption. DKA is a serious condition caused by high levels of acids in the blood called ketones. When the body doesn’t have enough insulin, it breaks down fat to use as energy, which produces ketones. Instances when DKA can develop: you forget to reconnect the insulin pump after exercising or showering, or the catheter is pulled out without your realizing it, your pump reservoir ran out of insulin, or your pump stops working suddenly. If basal insulin delivery is interrupted for more than one hour, check your blood sugar level and if your blood glucose levels are elevated, check also ketones level (using a simple urine test strip). Also, you should check your urine ketone levels if you have one or more high glucose reading despite taking an insulin bolus to correct the high blood sugar. Call your health care provider immediately if your ketone level is high. If you are hospitalized, you may be able to continue on your ins Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Living With An Insulin Pump

Diabetes: Living With An Insulin Pump

More and more people with diabetes are using insulin pumps instead of daily shots to manage their disease. The pumps give them more freedom to eat, sleep, and exercise when they want. A pump can be an important tool in preventing problems like very low blood sugar. But using an insulin pump takes some getting used to. The more you learn about your pump and how to live with it, the happier you will be. How to live with an insulin pump Choosing a pump Some people say choosing which pump to use is actually harder than deciding to switch to a pump in the first place. There are a number of insulin pump companies, and each pump is slightly different. Ask members of your diabetes team which pumps they recommend. If you have insurance, find out which pump brands are covered. Then ask those companies to send you information. Insulin pump companies also have websites where you can get all kinds of information. Your diabetes educator likely will have a variety of pumps that you can look at. Because improvements in insulin pumps are happening so fast, your local hospital may have open houses a few times a year so that pump makers can show their products and tell you how they work. Ask the company to send a sales representative to your home. That way you can see each pump you are considering, see how easy it is to program the pump, and learn how to give yourself a bolus (extra insulin). You should be able to try out the pump with saline solution. That way you can really see how it works and feels. Your infusion site The infusion site is the area on your body where you have attached your infusion set. Infusion sites can get infected, so it's important to know how to place the catheter correctly and to keep the area clean. Replace your infusion set every 2 or 3 days or as often as you Continue reading >>

Get On With Your Life

Get On With Your Life

A slim, discreet pump without buttons or a physical connection to a control unit allows its user to choose where and how to wear it. More importantly, the pump is small enough for you to wear whatever you want to wear. The Cellnovo pump is defined by freedom, choice and accuracy. Removable, waterproof, lifeproof Take it off, leave it on. Your call It should be up to you when you take off the pump, so we made it waterproof and easy to detach. You don't have to take it off for a shower or a swim, but if you want a nice soak in the tub without it, just whip it off. If you like a long bath, it's worth knowing that the pump's rated to survive at a depth of one metre for a whole hour. Because of its small size, the Cellnovo pump can be attached directly to the skin. Uniquely for pumps worn on the skin, hook and loop strips make it just a moment's effort to pull the pump off, and cap the infusion site. It's just as easy to re-attach when you need to. Pump: 150 units/3days, 54x 35x 14mm, Weight 32g (Full-cartridge) Built-in activity sensor Track when you're active, 24/7 Exercise can have a profound effect on the amount of insulin needed for good control, so tracking exercise accurately is an essential part of effective diabetes management. Using a tiny sensor in the pump, and the wireless connection to the handset, the Cellnovo System constantly tracks and records your activity. Through the online portal, you and your healthcare team can compare activity peaks with blood glucose for a comprehensive view of how activity is influencing your need for insulin. Without a simple and elegant interface, the benefits of technology stay locked inside impenetrable cases. With a focus on excellent design and excellent software, we strive to make the benefits of the Cellnovo System accessib Continue reading >>

I Use An Insulin Pump. If I Shower Just Before Putting In A New Infusion Set, It Seems To Come Off Much Sooner Than If I Do Not Shower First. Why Is This? Is This Common? Thanks Ahead!

I Use An Insulin Pump. If I Shower Just Before Putting In A New Infusion Set, It Seems To Come Off Much Sooner Than If I Do Not Shower First. Why Is This? Is This Common? Thanks Ahead!

Submit My husbands birthday is coming up and we are going for dinner then he and our friends may venture elsewhere. My question is if you go out how do you explain the diabetes kit? Do bouncers even care? (Needles, lancets etc) Checked BS 3 times, both read over 600. Mom won't take me to hospital because they aren't experience with DKA. I have almost all the signs of DKA expect large ketones and vomiting. Only small ketones and a stomach ache.What do I do? I would feel safer at a hospital but mom won't take me!Please Help! Submit I started Juicing in Feb. 2013 and in Sept. was told I was no longer diabetic. So I asked the Dr. Was he sure and he said Yes. So I was confused and shocked, so I asked him do I need to continue testing and his response was No you don't need to test at all. Months later & I'm confused. Not sure. My son Brad was asked to speak last night at a JDRF walkathon fund raising evening about his experience with AFREZZA the new Inhaled Insulin. People were VERY excited. Over 100 attendees. He is 26&T1 I have extra supplies, insulin pumps and CGMs. See list for details: Dexcom G4 receiver, Dexcom G5 receiver, Omnipod pump and four boxes of Omnipods (exp 9/28/2018), Medtronic 523, Medtronic 723. Let me know if you are interested, shoot me an offer. Thanks Continue reading >>

Bathing And Insulin Pumps

Bathing And Insulin Pumps

Tweet Pumps are designed to be able to deal with some moisture but not all pumps are intended to be immersed in water. When it comes to bathing or showering there are two main options. The first is to disconnect your insulin pump whilst you are having your shower or bath. The second option is to keep your pump on, but you may need to take precautions to prevent your pump either getting wet or getting too warm. Warm baths and showers If you are having a warm bath or shower, it is important to note that your body may absorb insulin more quickly than usual and you may need to take precautions to prevent a hypo from occurring. Exposure of your insulin pump to hot temperatures for extended periods of time could spoil the insulin inside the pump. If you are using a hot tub or sauna, it is advisable to disconnect your insulin pump and leave it in a cooler and dry place. Check the owner manual for specific information on ideal operating temperatures for your pump. Disconnecting your pump for a bath or shower If you are disconnecting the pump, you will need to be aware of how your blood glucose levels will respond. It is recommended that you do not keep your pump disconnected for over an hour to prevent your body from developing higher levels of ketones in the blood. If you are having a quick shower, this shouldn’t normally be a problem. If you are having a longer shower or a bath, then it is important to see how your blood sugar levels respond. Your blood glucose levels may rise, and sometimes fall, at different rates depending on a number of factors including: How close to a meal you disconnect the pump How much activity you have taken during the day How warm your bath or shower is. Testing your blood sugar levels before and after disconnecting your pump for a bath or shower Continue reading >>

Pool Time With The Pump

Pool Time With The Pump

This past Saturday our community pool opened for the season, and I was there at 11AM with my husband and kids, ready to dive in. We all love swimming, and its been especially hot this June in Philadelphia, so we spent most of our weekend at the pool. For me, swimming and being an insulin pump user is a pretty manageable issue, as long as I pay proper attention to important details, like keeping my pump cool and checking my blood glucose. Actually, the first detail of successful swimming and pumping for me begins a few weeks prior to the pool opening in the dressing room of Sears, where I can try on Lands’ End tankinis to find a bathing suit that looks decent with my pump clipped on. I remember when I was first considering insulin pump therapy — I was single and slim at 27 years old. I was devastated by the thought of clipping an insulin pump onto my bathing suit. Now, twelve pumping years later, having given birth to two beautiful children and not yet gotten back into pre-pregnancy shape, happily married and happy with the A1Cs I’m getting as a result of pump therapy, I can barely relate to those old feelings. As long as I can clip my pump onto the bottom part of my suit and the top part comes down enough to not show any stretch marks, I’m just fine with the suit! The next step in successful pumping at the pool is finding a shady spot on the grass to put down my bag. Our community pool is not fancy, but it is fortunately surrounded by grass and some beautiful, big old trees. We head right to a giant oak and spread our blanket underneath its shade. I always bring a small cooler packed with cold water and fruit and when I take off my pump, I lay it in the cooler right by an ice pack. The trickier piece is keeping my blood glucose in optimal range throughout our da Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everyone needs insulin to live. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use and store the food we eat. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make insulin and have to give insulin in order to sustain life. People with Type 2 Diabetes don’t use their own insulin well, and over time can have trouble making enough. So, all people with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin. When people give insulin injections, they may take 1-2 injections of a long acting insulin every day and 3+ injections of rapid acting insulin for meals and snacks. The typical person with Type 1 Diabetes could take anywhere from 4-7+ injections a day. Many people currently give insulin through an insulin pen or a syringe. But, there is another option, an insulin pump. An insulin pump delivers rapid acting insulin in two ways. First, the pump is programmed to give you insulin every hour throughout the hour referred to basal insulin. Basal, think “base,” is the insulin your body needs even in the absence of food, it is also referred to as background insulin. This basal rate replaces the long acting injection that you take. Second, is bolus, this is the insulin you take for food or to correct a high blood sugar. If you get basal and bolus confused, think “bowl”, as in you eat out of a bowl, to help you remember bolus is for food. Once you are on a pump, all insulin is delivered through the pump and shots are no longer necessary. Components There are a few things necessary to make a pump work. When a pump is shipped to someone: they will also need to send infusion sets, reservoirs, and possibly batteries, depending on your pump. Let’s talk about each component. Infusion Sets An infusion set is the part that is actually inserted into the body and has tubing that conn Continue reading >>

Getting My Vibe On With Animas, After Years Of Anticipation

Getting My Vibe On With Animas, After Years Of Anticipation

For two weeks during the holidays, I test-drove the new Animas Vibe combo device (Animas insulin pump plus Dexcom continuous glucose monitor) approved by FDA just over a month ago. We appreciate this opportunity for a trial-run of this exciting new device before it officially hits the market in the coming weeks. This is only the second combined insulin pump-CGM product ever made available in the U.S. (after Medtronic’s system), and the first to include the popular Dexcom G4, and it’s been a loooong time coming; Dexcom and Animas first announced their joint-development agreement back in January 2008, and this integrated system was launched overseas in mid-2011. There’s been a lot of buildup here in the States, before and after Animas filed with regulators in April 2013, so I had high hopes going into this two-week trial. {Disclosure: JnJ supplied me with the full system and supplies to last circa 16 days. As always, this was under the agreement that they would have no influence over what we say or write.} In the words of my awesome Animas educator during my training in late December: You can think of this system in terms of a dwelling — the two components used to be separate housing units, but now they co-exist under the same roof and are more like different rooms within one big home. Now anyone using it gets all the benefits of that combined home’s plumbing, heating, air conditioning, and so on. I found that there are good and not-so-good things about the Vibe, and as with everything, opinions will vary. Sadly, nothing wowed me personally about the Vibe, and even the built-in CGM isn’t enough to convince me it was worth the wait, or convince me to purchase this system for myself. Keep in mind: I’m coming at this from more than a decade of happy Medtronic p Continue reading >>

New To The T:slim Insulin Pump

New To The T:slim Insulin Pump

My ten-year-old daughter has been on the t:slim pump for 5 months now. Though my six-year-old daughter has continued with her pump with a remote device that I use to bolus her insulin, for my older daughter this was a good time to switch to a pump where she could take more control of bolusing herself. The t:slim pump is smaller than her previous pump so it fits more comfortably in the belt around her waist. It is so slick looking that while she was in the nurse’s office at school, an adult told her to put it away, thinking it was an itouch. (My daughter said she told her it was her insulin pump and the adult apologized profusely.) The t:slim’s quick bolus feature is very helpful. You can set the quick bolus for a certain number of carbs or for a certain number of units of insulin. Hers is set for 15 carbs, and it is so easy to use this feature that this is the way she usually boluses. For example, if she is having a 15 carb snack, she presses the quick bolus button to activate it and then pushes it once more for the 15 carbs. The pump vibrates back and then she pushes the button again to deliver the insulin bolus. For a 45 carb meal, she does the same thing but pushes the button 3 times to reach 45 in 15 increments. It is simple to do and discreet. Although she could swim with her previous pump attached, the t:slim needs to be disconnected. She tried swimming with it and an altitude alarm would suspend delivery. She now prefers to disconnect for gymnastics as well. When you have not disconnected for any activities including showering for the past 5 years, disconnecting becomes challenging because now you must remember to reconnect the pump. You might be surprised as to how many times I remembered by finding the pump in my purse or pocket. Once after gymnastics, we e Continue reading >>

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