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How Do You Properly Draw Insulin Into A Syringe?

Steps For Preparing A Mixed Dose Of Insulin

Steps For Preparing A Mixed Dose Of Insulin

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. XIAFLEX® can cause serious side effects, including: Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: hives swollen face breathing trouble chest pain low blood pressure Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not be right for you. Befor Continue reading >>

How To Prepare Two Types Of Insulin In One Syringe

How To Prepare Two Types Of Insulin In One Syringe

A step-by-step guide to combine two types of insulin in a single syringe ​People with diabetes may be prescribed two types of insulin to be taken at the same time. To reduce the number of insulin injections, it is common to combine two types of insulin in a single syringe using r​apid-acting (clear) insulin with either an intermediate or a long-acting (​​cloudy) insulin.​ ​ ​ ​​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Follow These Steps to Prepare the Injection: Prepare your supplies and remove the insulin vials from the fridge half an hour before your injection. Check their expiry dates. Discard the vial six weeks after opening or as per the manufacturer’s guide. Roll the vial of cloudy insulin (intermediate or long-acting insulin) until the white powder has dissolved. Do NOT shake the vial. Clean the rubber stopper of the insulin vials with an alcohol wipe or a cotton ball dipped in alcohol. Draw air into the syringe by pulling the plunger down. The amount of air drawn should be equal to the dose of cloudy insulin that you require. With the vial standing upright, insert the needle into the vial containing the cloudy insulin. Inject air into the vial and remove the needle. Repeat the steps with clear insulin. Draw air into the syringe that is equal to the dose of clear insulin you require. Insert the needle into the vial containing the clear insulin and inject air into the vial. Do NOT remove the needle. With the needle in the vial, turn the syringe and insulin vial upside down, and draw out your dose of clear insulin. Read the line markings on the syringe to make sure you have drawn the correct amount of insulin. Insert the needle back into the vial containing the cloudy insulin. Do NOT push the plunger. Turn the syringe and insulin vial upside down, and draw out y Continue reading >>

10 Steps To Prepare A Mixed Dose Of Insulin

10 Steps To Prepare A Mixed Dose Of Insulin

Many individuals that have diabetes need to take insulin in order to keep their blood sugar in a proper range. For certain individuals that can be scary, particularly the first time. You should know that insulin shots are actually not painful since the needles are thin and short. Also, the insulin shots are usually placed in the fatty tissue found below the skin. This is known as a subcutaneous injection. There are cases when the doctor prescribes a mixed insulin dose. This means that you need to take more than 1 type of insulin and you need to do that at once. With mixed dose, you will get the benefits of both longer-acting insulin and short-acting insulin without having two separate shots. In general, one of the insulin is clear and the other cloudy. Also, you should know that certain insulins cannot be mixed in one syringe. For example, you should never mix Levemir or Lantus with other solution. Always make sure to consult your diabetes educator, doctor or pharmacist before mixing. The steps below explain how to mix 2 different insulin types into one single shot properly. 10 Steps to Prepare the Injection Step #1 The first thing you need to do is prepare the supplies and remove the insulin vials from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before the injection. Also, make sure to check the expiry dates. According to the guide of the manufacturer, you need to discard the vial 6 weeks after its first opening. Step #2 Then, the next thing you need to do is to wash your hands properly and thoroughly with soap and water. Step #3 You need to roll the vial of the cloudy insulin (long-acting or intermediate insulin) and do that until the white power dissolves. Remember, you should not shake the vial. Step #4 Dip a cotton ball in alcohol or take an alcohol wipe an clean the rubb Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

How To Inject Insulin

How To Inject Insulin

Insulin is the hormone that your body needs to regulate blood sugar levels in your body. People with diabetes are unable to use insulin naturally in the body, and so you may be required to use synthetic or animal insulin to control your blood sugar levels. Insulin storage Insulin is measured in units. A fresh bottle of U-100 insulin, the most commonly used strength in the United States, contains 1,000 units. Insulin unit dosages vary according to the individual’s needs at different times of the day. Refrigerate insulin when unopened, and leave it at room temperature when it’s opened. Extreme hot or cold temperatures can decrease the effectiveness of insulin. Opened insulin is good for 30 days and then must be thrown away. Make sure your insulin isn’t expired before using. Correct injection amount After you measure your blood sugar levels, you need to inject the right amount of insulin to bring those levels into an appropriate range. Injecting too much insulin can lead to dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which could cause fainting or even a coma. Injecting too little insulin can lead to blood sugar levels that are too high (hyperglycemia), which can cause an array of complications over time, including eye diseases, foot problems, and heart disease. 1. Roll insulin Rapid-acting and short-acting insulin are clear. Intermediate-acting and long-acting insulin are cloudy. Before using the cloudy insulin, roll it between your palms for 15 seconds to mix. Tip: Do not shake. 2. Measure air Get your syringe. The number marks on the barrel of the syringe note how many units of insulin it can hold. Draw a measured amount of air into your syringe by pulling the plunger back, matching the black plunger tip with the correct marking on the syringe. Measure the same amo Continue reading >>

My Doctor Says I Should Learn To Use Insulin...

My Doctor Says I Should Learn To Use Insulin...

Drawing and Injecting Insulin BD Getting Started™BD Getting Started™ What Do I Do Next? It is important to know how to draw and inject insulin so that you can give your injection accurately, quickly and with comfort. It will be easy if you follow these steps for using one type of insulin. Check that you have the right syringe size. Match your dose to the syringe size that is just right for you. It is an easy way to assure the accuracy of your dosage. Bottle of Insulin BD Insulin Syringe BD™ Alcohol Swabs gather the supplies you will need: before you inject, gather the supplies you will need: before you inject, Also check that you have the right brand and type of insulin. Make sure that the expiration date on the insulin bottle has not passed. Between 30 and 50 units Between 50 and 100 units Use a 3/10 mL/cc BD Insulin Syringe Use a 1/2 mL/cc BD Insulin Syringe Use a 1 mL/cc BD Insulin Syringe Less than 30 units at one time - - - 1 2 3 if you inject:if you inject: 1 2 3 •If you are taking cloudy insulin, roll the bottle between your hands until it is uniformly cloudy. •Never shake a bottle of insulin. •Wipe the top of the insulin bottle with a BD™ Alcohol Swab step one...step one... step two...step two... step three...step three... •Wash your hands. 5 6 •Push the air into the insulin bottle. •Leave the needle in the insulin bottle . This makes it easier for you to draw the insulin out of the bottle. step five...step five... step two...step six... •Push the needle through the center of the rubber top of the insulin bottle. 4 •Pull the plunger down to let _____ units of air in your syringe. •You need air in the syringe equal to the amount of insulin you will take. step four...step four... 9 step Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children: Giving Insulin Shots To A Child

Diabetes In Children: Giving Insulin Shots To A Child

Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas. It lets sugar (glucose) enter body cells, where it is used for energy. It also helps the body store extra sugar in muscle and liver cells. The stored sugar can be released later and used for energy when needed. Insulin for injection comes in small glass bottles, or vials, and in cartridges. Both are sealed with a rubber lid. One vial or cartridge contains many doses. To remove a dose of insulin from: A cartridge: Use a pen-shaped device called an insulin pen. The cartridge fits inside the pen and the dose of insulin is set with a dial on the outside of the pen. The pen is used to give the insulin. Both disposable and reusable insulin pens are available. Each pen operates slightly differently. Note: If your child is using a disposable insulin pen, talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist about how to use the pen properly. Giving insulin with these pens is not covered in this information. To give an insulin injection, the needle is inserted through the skin. The medicine is pushed from the syringe into fatty tissue just below the skin. Insulin usually is injected into the abdomen, upper arm, buttocks, or thigh. Your child may need to take two types of insulin at the same time. Because most types of insulin that are prescribed to be taken at the same time can be mixed together, you can give both doses in the same syringe. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. TrueThis answer is correct. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. Insulin lets sugar (glucose) enter body cells, where it is used for energy. It also helps the body store extra sugar in muscle and liver cells. The stored sugar can be released later and used for energy when needed. FalseThis answer is incorrect. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. Insul Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen Safety

Insulin Pen Safety

Insulin pens have become a popular way for diabetics to give themselves insulin. Insulin pens are available for multiple insulin types. However, as with any technology, pens can be misused leading to medication errors and inaccurate administration of insulin. Although an insulin pen is easy to use, certain precautions must be taken to assure proper use. Below is a list of safety tips to keep in mind when using an insulin pen: 1. Do not share your insulin pen with anyone: Insulin pens should never be used for more than one person. Using insulin pens on more than one person puts people at risk for infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis viruses and HIV, which causes AIDS, the agency warns. Infection can occur even if an insulin pen's needle is changed. We are aware of this happening in hospitals, where, for example, a nurse may not realize the risk. Pen needles are changed in between patients but the very same pen is used for multiple patients! This is dangerous because even if the needle is changed, it's still possible for insulin in the pen to become contaminated. Then, when subsequent patients are injected, there's a danger of passing along harmful bacterial or virus. 2. Do not withdraw insulin from an insulin pen cartridge Using insulin pens as "mini" insulin vials, by drawing up insulin into an insulin syringe, can lead to inaccurate dose measurement the next time the insulin pen is used for dose delivery. The reason for this is related to air entering the pen unintentionally, interfering with the proper mechanics of the pen. 3. Do not leave an open needle attached to an insulin pen Leaving an insulin needle attached to an insulin pen can lead to unintentional air entering into the insulin pen. If unintentional air enters into the insulin pen, it can c Continue reading >>

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful because the needles are short and thin and the insulin shots are placed into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. In some cases, the doctor prescribes a mixed dose of insulin. This means taking more than one type of insulin at the same time. A mixed dose allows you to have the benefits of both short-acting insulin along with a longer acting insulin — without having to give 2 separate shots. Usually, one of the insulins will be cloudy and the other clear. Some insulins cannot be mixed in the same syringe. For instance, never mix Lantus or Levemir with any other solution. Be sure to check with your doctor, pharmacist, or diabetes educator before mixing. These instructions explain how to mix two different types of insulin into one shot. If you are giving or getting just one type of insulin, refer to the patient education sheet Insulin: How to Give a Shot. What You Will Need Bottles of insulin Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Syringe with needle (You will need a prescription to buy syringes from a pharmacy. Check with your pharmacist to be sure the syringe size you are using is correct for your total dose of insulin.) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of a Syringe and Needle You will use a syringe and needle to give the shot. The parts are labeled below. Wash the work area (where you will set the insulin and syringe) well with soap and water. Wash your hands. Check the drug labels to be sure they are what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date o Continue reading >>

Care And Administration Of Insulin

Care And Administration Of Insulin

So, your dog or cat was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM)? This can be a very daunting diagnosis for most pet owners, especially when the veterinarian tells you that your beloved animal will require twice daily insulin injections. Although it seems difficult and technically demanding at first, giving insulin injections under the skin is not as hard as you may think. Just follow a few guidelines listed below and you'll be a pro in no time! Approach the pet with the syringe already drawn up and hidden from site. Using your thumb and forefinger on your left hand if you are right-handed, pinch the skin and lift it up (tenting the skin). Avoid the "scruff", or skin over the back of the neck. This area doesn't have good enough blood supply to absorb the insulin well. Holding the needle with you right hand with the bevel up, push the needle into the skin quickly and confidently. Approach the skin at a 45 degree angle and aim for the area of skin you have pulled up while "tenting". This ensures that the needle goes under the skin and NOT in the muscle. Visually verify that the needle went into the skin and not just the fur. Make sure your pet has eaten before giving insulin. This is especially critical if your pet is well regulated so you don't cause his/her blood sugar to drop too low (hypoglycemia). Continue reading >>

Drawing And Injecting Insulin

Drawing And Injecting Insulin

It is important to know how to draw and inject your insulin properly. By learning to use the proper technique you can give yourself injections quickly, accurately and with a minimum of discomfort and inconvience. It is easy if you follow these steps. before giving yourself any insulin injections, you must assemble all the supplies necessary: your bottle of insulin, alcohol swabs, and the insulin syringe. Note: Always inspect the insulin bottle before using it. Make sure the expiration date had not passed and that the top of the bottle is not damaged. Thoroughly wash your hands. If you are using NPH, or any other cloudy, long-lasting insulins, mix the insulin by slowly rolling the bottle between your hands. Never shake the bottle. Clean the rubber stopper on the insulin bottle with an alcohol swab Draw air into the syringe by pulling out one the plunger to the approximate dose. With the bottle standing upright, insert the needle into the rubber stopper on the bottle and push the plunger down. This pushes air into the bottle, which makes it easier for you to draw the insulin out of the bottle. Turn the bottle and syringe upside down. Slowly pull the plunger down about five units past your dose. If there no bubbles, push the top of the plunger tip up to the line which marks your exact dose. If there are air bubbles, tap the syringe untill they float to the top, then eliminate them out as you push the plunger tip to your exact dose. Destroy the syringe by clipping off the needle with an insulin needle clipper, or very carefully break off the needle. Drop the unusable syringe into an empty resealable household container such as a coffee can or bleach bottle. When the container is full, seal the lid securely and deposit in the trash. Continue reading >>

Injections

Injections

When preparing an injection from an ampule, what will the nurse do if liquid is trapped in the neck of the ampule? Check the medication cabinet for an extra ampule of the medication. Notify the pharmacy that an additional ampule of medication will be needed. Use quick, light finger taps on the top of the ampule to move the liquid. Shake the medication out of the neck of the ampule. Use quick, light finger taps on the top of the ampule to move the liquid. CORRECT. Tapping the ampule will move the trapped fluid out of the neck of the ampule. What is the greatest safety concern when withdrawing medication from an ampule? Not wearing gloves when preparing medication Selecting an inappropriate needle size Withdrawing glass particles into the syringe Withdrawing bubbles into the syringe Withdrawing glass particles into the syringe CORRECT. Measures must be taken to prevent glass particles from being drawn into the syringe when aspirating medication from an ampule. How does the nurse minimize the risk of patient infection when preparing medication from an ampule? Using a filter needle to draw up the medication Preparing the medication in the patient's room Applying clean gloves while preparing the medication Preserving the sterility of the needle while preparing the medication Preserving the sterility of the needle while preparing the medication CORRECT. Maintaining the sterility of the needle is the primary method of minimizing the patient's risk for infection while preparing medication from an ampule. Which action minimizes the risk of introducing glass particles into the syringe when drawing medication from an ampule? Using minimal force to snap the neck of the ampule Using gauze to cover the top of the ampule when snapping it Using a filter needle or straw to draw the medi Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Reuse An Insulin Syringe?

Is It Safe To Reuse An Insulin Syringe?

My husband is a Type 2 diabetic who takes insulin three times a day. He often reuses the same syringe day after day or multiple times in one day. I am very concerned about this habit. It is unhealthy or dangerous? This is a common question and indeed a common problem. Insulin syringes are expensive, and many patients want to reuse needles to save money. Many also reuse the lancets used to prick the skin and draw blood to measure blood sugar. You are right that the reuse of insulin syringes and lancets is dangerous. It can even be deadly, as it can cause a number of skin infections. Some of these infections can progress beyond a localized problem and become an abscess or even systemic blood infection. A person with Type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is also referred to as adult-onset diabetes mellitus, is at risk of developing a number of health problems. Most talked about is the risk of cardiovascular disease, which includes an increased risk of heart attack, stroke and peripheral vascular disease, as well as kidney disease and diabetic eye disease. Diabetic vascular disease is a leading cause of leg amputation. Diabetic kidney disease is a leading cause of kidney failure and dialysis. Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness. Important risks that we should perhaps talk more about include the risk of infection. Diabetes increases the risk of infections of the skin, lung (pneumonia), and other organs. All of these risks can be reduced through good blood sugar control, good diet, exercise, and taking medications properly. Mild diabetes can be controlled through diet and exercise. Moderate disease often requires oral medications, and more severe Type 2 disease requires oral medicines and insulin injections. These injections are sometimes administered two, three or Continue reading >>

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

Syringe

Syringe

Disposable syringe with needle, with parts labelled: plunger, barrel, needle adaptor, needle hub, needle bevel, needle shaft. A typical plastic medical syringe, fitted with a detachable stainless steel needle. According to the World Health Organisation, about 90% of the medical syringes are used to administer drugs, 5% for vaccinations and 5% for other uses such as blood transfusions.[1] A syringe is a simple reciprocating pump consisting of a plunger (though in modern syringes it's actually a piston) that fits tightly within a cylindrical tube called a barrel[2]. The plunger can be linearly pulled and pushed along the inside of the tube, allowing the syringe to take in and expel liquid or gas through a discharge orifice at the front (open) end of the tube. The open end of the syringe may be fitted with a hypodermic needle, a nozzle or a tubing to help direct the flow into and out of the barrel. Syringes are frequently used in clinical medicine to administer injections, infuse intravenous therapy into the bloodstream, apply compounds such as glue or lubricant, and draw/measure liquids. The word "syringe" is derived from the Greek σύριγξ (syrinx, meaning "tube") via back-formation of a new singular from its Greek-type plural "syringes" (σύριγγες). Medical syringes[edit] See also: Hypodermic needle The threads of the Luer lock tip of this 12mL disposable syringe keep it securely connected to a tube or other apparatus. An old glass syringe. Sectors in the syringe and needle market include disposable and safety syringes, injection pens, needleless injectors, insulin pumps, and specialty needles.[3] Hypodermic syringes are used with hypodermic needles to inject liquid or gases into body tissues, or to remove from the body. Injecting of air into a blood vessel i Continue reading >>

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