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How Do You Give Yourself A Shot Of Insulin?

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Injecting insulin at home is done subcutaneously, under the skin, but not into muscle or vein. See also Syringe and Insulin pen. It's best to pull up some loose skin into a tent[1][2], then insert the needle firmly, bevel side up[3][4] for comfort[5]. {C BD has animations with narrations to help you learn how to draw insulin properly[6]. One can select from drawing one insulin or combining two insulins in the same syringe. Selecting this and the style of syringe you use personalizes the demo for your needs. The presentation is very clear and unhurried. BD also has a slideshow which shows how to inject your dog[7] or cat[8]. Injecting any insulin at the same site repeatedly over time or blunting a needle with re-use[10] can cause a lipodystrophy: either lipoatrophy[11] or lipohypertrophy. Either makes absorption unreliable. But varying the injection site can cause variability in action profile, too. This page illustrates[12] illustrates the most common areas humans with diabetes inject insulin and explains how absorption differs in various areas of the human body. This is true for ALL insulins. The new shot area needn't be very far from where the last shot was given--the distance of the width of 2 fingers will do fine as a measure[13]. Most of us dealing with pet diabetes vary the side we give the injections in--right side mornings and left side evenings, for example. This is another help in avoiding giving shots in the same areas[14]. Many people give insulin shots in the scruff of the pet's neck, which is now considered to be a less than optimum choice. The neck area provides poor insulin Absorption, due to it not having many capillaries, veins. etc. (vascularization). Other sites suggested by Dr. Greco include the flank and armpit[15]. Intervet recommends giving injec Continue reading >>

7 Tips For Using Insulin In Public

7 Tips For Using Insulin In Public

If you use insulin to manage your blood sugar, there’s a good chance you’ll need to give yourself an insulin injection in public at least once, if not often. And while the very idea of injecting in public can be intimidating, you can take comfort in the fact that a great many people with diabetes give themselves insulin injections in restaurants, movie theatres, offices, on airplanes, and in other public spaces. Here’s how you can safely and responsibly use insulin in public, without making anyone (including yourself) uncomfortable. 1. Keep supplies close and labeled. When you leave home, you’ll likely need to bring your insulin, injection supplies and, perhaps, your blood glucose testing supplies. Keep everything close to your body; if you’re traveling via airplane, for instance, be sure your supplies are in an easily accessible carry-on bag, not packed away in checked luggage. Keep insulin, syringes and insulin pens in their original packaging, so anyone who might question you has proof that your supplies are medical grade and medically necessary. It’s also a good idea to wear a medical bracelet or necklace that indicates you have diabetes and use insulin. Some people even carry a doctor’s note stating the same. 2. Be prepared to educate and explain. You might get some funny looks when people see you pulling out an insulin syringe. Realize that most people are curious, and may have unasked questions or concerns about safety. Be prepared to address curious glances with a simple comment, such as “I have diabetes” or “I need to take insulin to stay healthy.” Similarly, be prepared for the fact that some people may make rude or hurtful comments. If they’re not receptive to your explanations, simply disregard such comments and remember your health c Continue reading >>

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

When diet, exercise, and oral medications aren’t enough to manage type 2 diabetes, it may be time for insulin. The most important aspect of insulin therapy is using it exactly as prescribed. Still, remembering all the little details can be tricky, and certain mistakes are common. By following these dos and don’ts, you can avoid medication mishaps and keep insulin working as it should. DO: Rotate the insertion site (while keeping the body part consistent). “Insulin is absorbed at different speeds depending on where you inject it, so it’s best to consistently use the same part of the body for each of your daily injections,” says Doreen Riccelli, BSN, director of education at Lake Pointe Medical Center in Rowlett, Texas. “For example, don’t inject yourself in the abdomen on Saturday and in the thigh on Sunday,” she says. “If you choose the thigh for your evening injection, then use the thigh for all of your evening injections.” That said, within the specific body area, it’s important to move each injection site at least one finger’s width from the previous injection site to avoid the creation of hard lumps or extra fat deposits, which could change the way insulin is absorbed. DON’T: Store insulin incorrectly. Insulin can generally be stored at room temperature (59 to 86° F), either opened or unopened, for one month. When kept in the refrigerator, unopened bottles last until the expiration date printed on the bottle. Opened bottles stored in the refrigerator should be used or discarded after a month. Never store insulin in direct sunlight, in the freezer, or near heating or air conditioning vents, ovens, or radiators. It should also not be left in a very warm or cold car. Store it in an insulated case if needed. DO: Work closely with your doctor. Continue reading >>

How To Use An Insulin Pen

How To Use An Insulin Pen

Instructions Use the following instructions when injecting insulin for diabetes. Do not mix your diabetes medicine with any other medicines. Where to give shots Choose an injection area in your abdomen, upper or outer thigh, the back of your upper arms, or your buttocks. Stay two inches away from previous insulin injections or other shots. Stay two inches away from your belly button or from any scar. Do not use sites that are bruised, tender or swollen. Inject the insulin in different areas to prevent scars. The insulin will also absorb into your bloodstream better. Your insulin pen has a dial which you set to give the right amount of insulin. You can see the right amount through the dose window. 1. Collect all of your supplies. 2. Wash your hands. 3. Clean your skin with an alcohol pad. Let the area air dry. 4. Take the cover off the pen. The insulin is already in the pen. 5. If you are using cloudy insulin, gently roll the pen between your hands to mix the insulin. 6. Wipe off the end of the pen with where the needle will screw on with an alcohol pad. 7. Peel off the paper cover on the pen needle. Screw the needle onto the pen. 9. Turn the dose dial to 2 (units). 10. Hold the pen so the needle is pointing up. 11. Push in the dose button at the end of the pen to clear the air out of the pen. (See drawing, at right.) You should see a drop of insulin at the tip of the needle. You may need to repeat steps 9 through 11 until you see the drop of insulin. 12. Turn the dose dial to the number of units of insulin you will inject. 13. Lightly pinch and hold your skin at the site you will be giving your shot. Push the needle straight in. The needle should be all the way into your skin. 15. Let go of the pinch of skin. 16. Pull out the needle. 17. Unscrew the needle from the pen. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Injecting Insulin

Gestational Diabetes And Injecting Insulin

The insulin is often contained in a pen device with a very small needle that works with a spring. The injections are not usually painful, though they may feel worse if you are anxious. Once people learn to relax, they often find that it is straightforward. Insulin is usually injected into fattier areas such as your tummy, buttocks or thighs. It is important to pick different areas to inject in rotation so that lumps don’t develop under the skin. These can stop the insulin being properly absorbed. Some women feel worried about injecting into their tummy during pregnancy and prefer to use their thighs. In late pregnancy you might find it hard to reach your buttocks so your choice might be limited by where you can reach. Steps to injecting insulin Watch this film from Diabetes UK or follow the steps below Your diabetes team will teach you how to inject insulin, but you can use these steps as a quick reminder. You will need: a pen or syringe, a clean needle, a vial of insulin, a swab to clean the skin, a sharps bin for the used needle. Step 1 Expel two units of insulin into the air to make sure the needle is completely full of insulin. Step 2 Make sure you have the correct dose. Step 3 Decide where you are going to inject. Step 4 If you find the injections painful, rub ice on the area for 20 seconds. Then dry it. Step 5 Gently pinch a fold of skin, if your team has taught you to do this (usually only if you are very slim). Step 6 Put the needle in quickly. Step 7 Inject the insulin, making sure you have pushed down the plunger or button fully. Step 8 Count to ten before pulling the needle out. Step 9 If you pinched a skin fold in Step 4, now let it go. Step 10 Dispose of the needle safely in a sharps bin. Step 11 If you have any problems at all, contact your diabetes team Continue reading >>

Choosing Best Body Site For An Insulin Shot

Choosing Best Body Site For An Insulin Shot

In the past, doctors and nurses told patients to rotate their insulin shots to different sites on their bodies. Now we know that it's best to take insulin shots in the part of the body that matches the insulin action a person wants. See Illustration: Sites for Injecting Insulin Injection Areas and Action Insulin enters the bloodstream faster from some areas of the body than from others. Where you take your shot can affect your blood sugar levels. Generally, insulin enters the blood: Fastest from the abdomen (stomach area). A little slower from the arms. Even more slowly from the legs. Slowest from the buttocks. Exercising can also speed up the amount of time it takes for the insulin to enter your blood. You can figure out where to take your shot based on how quickly or slowly you want the insulin to enter your bloodstream. For example, if you're going to be exercising, such as walking or doing any kind of lifting, you probably don't want to take your shot in your leg or arm. Exercising those areas quickens the amount of time it takes for the insulin to get into your blood stream. This can cause your blood sugar to drop suddenly during or right after you exercise. If you plan to eat right after taking your shot, you might use a site on your stomach. That way the insulin will be available faster to handle the rise in your blood sugar after the meal. Rotate Sites in the Same Area Follow these guidelines when you choose a site to take your shot. Try to be consistent in where you take your shots. Always take your shot of fast-acting insulin in the stomach or arm. Take slower-acting insulin in the leg or buttocks. Try to avoid using the exact spot you used for your last shot. For example, space your next shot just an inch or so from your last previous shot. If you use the sam Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful as people imagine because the needles are short and thin. Insulin shots are given into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. The following instructions are for using most disposable insulin pens. If you are using a refillable pen, check with your doctor, diabetes educator or pharmacist on how to use. If you prefer to use a vial and syringe, refer to UPMC patient education page Insulin: How to Give a Shot. ADVANTAGES of insulin pens: Easy to use and carry Looks like a pen for writing (discreet/not easily noticed) No need to draw the insulin dose from a vial/bottle Can be used for most insulin types Doses can be easily dialed Less waste of expired insulin if not much insulin is used within time period designated (300 units in each pen)…see table end of this document To some people it may be less scary than a syringe DISADVANTAGES: Cannot mix different kinds of insulin together in a prescribed dose. Before you give the shot, you will need the following: Insulin pen Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Pen needle (be sure your doctor writes your prescription for the pen needles as well as the specific type of insulin pen) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of an Insulin Pen Wash your hands. Check the drug label to be sure it is what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date on the pen. Do not use a drug that is past the expiration date. Also do not use if beyond number of days listed in table at end of this document once opened and in use. Remove pen cap Continue reading >>

How To Give Yourself An Insulin Injection

How To Give Yourself An Insulin Injection

Everyone with type 1 diabetes and a large number of people with type 2 diabetes will eventually need to inject themselves with insulin. People starting insulin should sit down with their diabetes educator, pharmacist, physician, or other primary health care provider to learn the proper injection technique. These experts can teach you, watch you, and help you master insulin injections. Here are the basic steps for giving yourself an insulin injection: Check the type and expiry date of your insulin. (Learn how to store your insulin properly. Insulin that is not being used should be kept in the fridge. Insulin that is currently being used can stay at room temperature for up to a month on average.) Wash both your hands and the area to be injected with regular soap, then rinse off the soap residue with water. You do not need to wipe the area with alcohol, although this was recommended in the past. Choose your injection site, as recommended by your health care team. It is important to rotate your injection sites (this means regularly changing the injection spot). Your diabetes educator can give you some tips on how to do this. If you are using a type of insulin that is normally cloudy, rotate it in your hand to mix it up (if your insulin is normally clear and it appears cloudy, discard it). a. For insulin pen users: Attach a pen needle. Dial up the right number of units on the pen. b. For insulin syringe users: Draw up the right number of units of air into the syringe. Inject the air into the insulin vial. Turn the vial upside down and draw up the right number of units of insulin. Pull the needle out of the bottle. Tap the syringe so air bubbles go to the top and they can be pushed out. Ask your diabetes educator whether you should pinch your skin before inserting the needle. Continue reading >>

How To Inject Insulin

How To Inject Insulin

Tweet When you are injecting insulin, you should aim to inject into the fatty tissue just underneath the skin. If you think you are injecting into the muscle, you may want to change your technique or ask your GP to prescribe shorter needles. The steps below are a broad guide to injecting insulin. If you plan to change your technique, check with your healthcare team, diabetic nurse or consultant for their advice. How to perform an insulin injection Firstly, prepare your kit. You will need: An insulin pen Enough insulin inside to give the required dose A new pen needle Cotton wool or a tissue Make sure you have your kit available at all times and if possible, inform your family as to its location. If you suffer from a hypo, this will allow your family to act quickly. Injecting your insulin shot To perform your insulin injection: Wherever possible, wash your hands with soap and water before injecting Put a new needle onto your pen Perform an ‘air shot’ of at least 2 units to clear any bubbles out of the needle – if you do not get a steady stream, repeat the air shot until you do get a steady stream Dial up your dose – how you do this exactly may depend on which pen you have Pick a soft fatty area to inject – tops of thighs, belly, bum and triceps (not always recommended for children or thinner people) Raise a fold of fatty flesh slightly between your thumb and fingers - leaving plenty of space between to put the needle in Put the needle in – if you are particularly slim, you may need to put the needle in at a 45 degree angle to avoid injecting into the muscle Push the plunger, to inject the dose, relatively slowly After the dose has been injected, hold the needle in for a good 10 seconds to prevent too much insulin from escaping out If any blood or insulin esca Continue reading >>

At What Age Do Diabetic Children Give Their Own Injections?

At What Age Do Diabetic Children Give Their Own Injections?

Abstract The age at which diabetic children gave themselves insulin injections (injection independence) was investigated by analysis of the notes on 66 children who attend the Oxford (England) Paediatric Diabetic Clinic. The mean age of injection independence was found to be 11.2 years (SD, 2.2 years). Sex, rank in the family, and family experience of diabetes had no effect on the age of injection independence. A group of 11 children were identified as being "late injectors," having not gained injection independence by the age of 14 years. No psychiatric or adverse psychosocial factors were found that distinguished this group from the 45 children who could give their own injections by this age. Continue reading >>

How To Give Yourself An Insulin Injection

How To Give Yourself An Insulin Injection

We all grew up with some dread about those occasional visits to the doctor — and usually it was that fear of getting a shot. Sure it was nice to get a lollipop (or a maybe a sticker, if your parents were lame like that), but it probably didn’t seem like a fair deal, right? And now that you’re faced with giving yourself an insulin injection, don’t think that you’re unusual or especially cowardly if this appears to be *the worst* element of having diabetes. One (very minor) consolation, however, is that insulin injections are subcutaneous, meaning the area between the skin and the muscle, so the needles are usually smaller and shorter than you’re imagining. Actually, after the novelty (or “terror”, as it may be) wears off and you have some practice, you’ll find that it can be a simple and pain-free process. One key to minimizing discomfort is to be quick and confident with your movements, and you will absolutely get better with practice … but that’s not much consolation when you’re first starting out, so let’s walk through it step by step, with some helpful tips along the way. Note: This information is for educational purposes only and is not medical advice. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, please talk with your doctor. CHECK YOUR INSULIN Insulin has an expiration date, so be mindful of this and don’t use expired insulin. Seriously — just toss it. Insulin also can’t be stored in the freezer, or left in direct sunlight. If you were keeping it cool in a bag or the refrigerator, give it time (30 minutes) to warm up to room temperature. Once you open a vial you can keep it room temperature for around 28 days. There are several different brands of insulin, so know which you use and check that you know your dosage. You’ll w Continue reading >>

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

A Guide To Injecting For Your Child With Diabetes

A Guide To Injecting For Your Child With Diabetes

4 Diabetes. The basics. – Why does my child need insulin? – How did my child get diabetes? – Controlling diabetes 7 Emotional issues. Coming to terms with the news. 8 Getting started. Explaining diabetes to your child. 10 Monitoring blood sugar. Knowing where your child stands. 12 Injecting. It’s easier than you think. – Using a pen – Using a syringe – Mixing insulin in a syringe 16 Injecting correctly. The best sites, the best way. 18 Injecting correctly. Ensuring the right technique. 20 Preventing lipos. Using sites correctly. 22 Sharp thinking. The importance of using new needles. 24 Useful information. Facts, resources, help. Contents Very Important Points! This booklet contains lots of important information about diabetes. Look out for the VIP icon.VIP! Caring for children with diabetes 3 You’re reading this booklet because your child needs to start insulin injections. You may be anxious or shocked at your child’s diagnosis. Don’t worry. We’re in this together. With diabetes properly managed, your child can lead a perfectly normal life. Around 650,000 people in Canada inject to manage their diabetes1. Children can usually do their testing and injections themselves once they feel ready. Injecting isn’t difficult. It’s easy to learn. It’s quick and more comfortable than you would think. It’s just about getting into a good, regular routine. This simple guide explains how to get started. Along with advice from your child’s Doctor or Diabetes Educator, this booklet will help. We’re in this together. 4 Caring for children with diabetes Why does my child need insulin? Your child has diabetes because their pancreas, an organ close to their stomach, doesnâ Continue reading >>

How To Not Bruise So Easily With Injections

How To Not Bruise So Easily With Injections

One common complaint you will hear from those with diabetes is about the amount of bruising that takes place from multiple injections. While a bruise here or there seems like just something that comes along with injecting insulin, there are some things you can do to prevent frequent bruising from occurring. While there are many reasons why you may experience bruising after an injection, you can try the following techniques to help reduce your chances of bruising. Ice the site where you will be giving an injection about 30 to 60 seconds before doing so. The cold temperature on your skin will help to shrink the capillary blood vessels which are more prone to getting punctured during an injection. If you notice that you experience bruising on your stomach more frequently ensure you are not injecting the insulin too close to your belly button. A good rule of thumb, or two fingers is to place two fingers around your belly button to get a general idea of how far two inches away will be. This is the suitable area that you can inject in. It may seem contradictory but the shorter your needles are the greater the chance you have at bruising. You want to inject your insulin at a 90-degree angle and not with a slanted angle. This will allow you to get into the skin easier and more efficiently than puncturing fully like the slanted angle. Rotating injection sites is extremely important as it can lead to bruising by using repeated areas. Scar tissue can also develop when you don’t rotate sites so this makes it more difficult for insulin to be readily absorbed into the body, allow it to not be used as efficiently as it should be. Other Common Insulin Injection Issues Bruising is not the only concern that those with diabetes have when it comes to injecting insulin. In fact, there are Continue reading >>

Giving Yourself An Insulin Injection With The Flexpen

Giving Yourself An Insulin Injection With The Flexpen

This information describes how to prepare and give yourself an insulin injection (shot) with the FlexPen®. Your nurse will review these steps with you and help you practice them. Storing Your FlexPen® Keep all new, unused insulin pens in the refrigerator. Do not freeze them. Never put the pen you are using back in the refrigerator. Keep it at room temperature, away from heat and sunlight. Refer to the table below to know when to discard your FlexPen®. Insulin Type When to Discard your FlexPen® NovoLog® 28 days after piercing the rubber stopper NovoLog® Mix 70/30 14 days after piecing the rubber stopper Levemir® 42 days after piercing the rubber stopper Clear off a clean, flat tabletop to work on and gather the following supplies: The insulin your doctor prescribed: NovoLog® (clear), NovoLog® Mix 70/30 (cloudy), or Levemir® (clear) A new single-use pen needle Alcohol swabs A wastebasket A sharps container (a strong, plastic container with a tight cap). Do not store your sharps in glass bottles, soda bottles, milk jugs, aluminum cans, coffee cans, or paper or plastic bags. For more information, please read How to Store and Dispose of Your Home Medical Sharps. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Open an alcohol swab and wipe the rubber tip at the top of the pen (see Figure 1). Remove the tabbed paper from the outer cap of a new single-use needle (see Figure 2). Follow the steps below to prime the pen, set your dose, and inject the insulin. You must prime the pen before you set your dose and inject the insulin. You will do this by giving an “air shot”. This removes the air bubbles and ensures the pen and needle are working properly. Dial 2 units (to the number 2) on the dose selector dial by turning it clockwi Continue reading >>

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