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How Do Insulin Spikes Cause Weight Gain?

Does High Insulin Cause Weight Gain?

Does High Insulin Cause Weight Gain?

Tweet Does high insulin cause weight gain? Over the years Americans have been getting higher fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c blood levels. A study from Life Extension Magazine showed 66% higher than desired fasting insulin. Twenty-Two percent had hemoglobin A1c levels that placed them in a pre-diabetic state. Hemoglobin A1c measures the percentage of glycated hemoglobin in one’s blood. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be below 5.6% yet more than one in five people test over 6%. Gaining access to this kind of information can prevent severe diabetic related illness. Insulin is a hormone that regulates carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Insulin enables liver and muscle cells to take up blood sugar (glucose) for energy production or storage. Insulin also helps to pack glucose into the fat cells as triglycerides. Once a burst of insulin is released in response to food ingestion, insulin levels should drop below 5 uIU/ml and only a small amount of insulin should be needed to maintain balance. When the fasting insulin levels are above 5 uIU/ml, this indicates a pre-diabetic state that increases the risk of degenerative disease. In people with metabolic disorders or obesity insulin levels remain elevated. While this creates cellular damage it also prevents weight loss by forcing glucose into the fat cells as storage. In a condition called hyperinsulinemia the pancreas stimulates the uptake of glucose from blood into the body’s cells. The inability of the body’s cells to utilize the insulin is called insulin resistance. In hyperinsulinemia the pancreas produces more insulin than normal so there are higher levels of insulin circulating in the blood stream. Normally to process 10mg of sugar a person would have to produce one unit of insulin, but in a person with hyperinsulinemi Continue reading >>

How Sugar Makes You Fat

How Sugar Makes You Fat

Look at how many grams of sugar are in what you’re eating (on the nutritional label). Now divide that number by 4. That’s how many teaspoons of pure sugar you’re consuming. Kinda scary, huh? Sugar makes you fat and fatfree food isn’t really free of fat. I’ve said it before in multiple articles, but occasionally, I’ve had someone lean over my desk and say “How in the heck does sugar make you fat if there’s no fat in it?”. This article will answer that puzzler, and provide you with some helpful suggestions to achieve not only weight loss success, but improved body health. First, let’s make some qualifications. Sugar isn’t inherently evil. Your body uses sugar to survive, and burns sugar to provide you with the energy necessary for life. Many truly healthy foods are actually broken down to sugar in the body – through the conversion of long and complex sugars called polysaccharides into short and simple sugars called monosaccharides, such as glucose. In additions to the breakdown products of fat and protein, glucose is a great energy source for your body. However, there are two ways that sugar can sabotage your body and cause fat storage. Excess glucose is the first problem, and it involves a very simple concept. Anytime you have filled your body with more fuel than it actually needs (and this is very easy to do when eating foods with high sugar content), your liver’s sugar storage capacity is exceeded. When the liver is maximally full, the excess sugar is converted by the liver into fatty acids (that’s right – fat!) and returned to the bloodstream, where is taken throughout your body and stored (that’s right – as fat!) wherever you tend to store adipose fat cells, including, but not limited to, the popular regions of the stomach, hips, but Continue reading >>

How Blood Sugar Levels May Mean The Difference Between Weight Gain And Weight Loss

How Blood Sugar Levels May Mean The Difference Between Weight Gain And Weight Loss

Anyone who has tried to lose weight can tell you the process is so much more complex than counting calories in and calories out. The formula for daily caloric intake has been a subject of controversy, disproven by various experts and even frustrated dieters, posing questions such as these: Why can some people stay thin eating anything they’d like, while other people seem to gain weight if they so much as look at a cookie? How could my weight be impacted the same way if I eat a thousand calories worth of broccoli versus a thousand calories worth of doughnuts? If I only burn off 200 calories at the gym, can I just cut 200 calories from my diet, skip the workout, and lose the same amount of weight? Why do some prescription drugs make me gain weight when my diet hasn’t changed? Obviously, there are more elements involved than just calories when it comes to weight loss, and here’s the explanation: Every body is different. We are all impacted by factors such as hormonal balance, rate of activity, diet, environmental toxins, sleep quality, states of health, stress, genetics, and so forth. One of the main points those who are trying to lose weight should take into consideration is their blood sugar levels. Here’s why: When you eat something, your body takes the carbohydrates (or sugars) from the food and turns them into blood sugar (also known as “glucose”). The glucose is picked up by insulin, a hormone the pancreas produces for the express purpose of transporting glucose to the cells. If the cells need energy, the glucose is transformed into energy and used; if they already have enough energy, the glucose is stored away as fat (to burn when the body needs more energy). Some glucose is also stored in the liver and in the muscles. The higher the levels of glucose in Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And Weight Loss

Insulin Resistance And Weight Loss

Insulin resistance and weight loss… How are they related? Insulin resistance is related to diabetes, a condition that keeps your body from producing or using its insulin effectively, and it can make it incredibly difficult to lose weight. A heads up before reading this article: The terms ‘diabetes‘ and ‘prediabetes‘ are discussed a lot in this article. Even if you don’t have either of these conditions, don’t dismiss the information in this article. Here’s why. Insulin resistance, left unchecked, can LEAD to diabetes. It’s the first step in those that become prediabetic and eventually diabetic, and it’s VERY important to reverse insulin resistance so that you don’t become diabetic. Insulin resistance and diabetes is unfortunately common in today’s world, and untold numbers of adults are prediabetic, often without knowing it. If you’ve already received a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or you’ve struggled throughout your life with type 1, you may have a deeper understanding of the constant struggle to maintain proper insulin levels. Here is the problem: Insulin resistance can cause weight gain and make it VERY difficult to lose weight. The way your body breaks down sugar dictates whether you gain, maintain, or lose pounds. To get a better understanding of this sadly all-too-common condition, let’s discuss what insulin resistance is, how this condition arises, and what you can to do successfully lose weight while managing this complication. What Causes Insulin Resistance? I’m going to put this in laymen’s terms so as to avoid getting too scientific (we’ll outline some more of the scientific details in the next section). Insulin resistance is sadly a self-inflicted wound and even sadder is the fact that most people have no idea that they are Continue reading >>

Is It Time To Stop Blaming Insulin For “fat Storage”?

Is It Time To Stop Blaming Insulin For “fat Storage”?

Crack open any physiology textbook and chances are you’ll learn that after eating any normal meal, the release of insulin from the pancreas then signals the shutdown of the release of fatty acids from adipose (body fat) tissue and the increase of fatty acid uptake. Because of this well-known role of insulin, one of the more puzzling explanations offered by some – including a few respected scientists and medical professionals — for weight gain is that elevated insulin is to blame because of its involvement in “fat storage”. In addition, they argue that the reason why a diet lower in carbohydrates works for weight loss is because of reduced levels of the peptide hormone. It’s an easy conclusion to make. The logic goes that carbohydrates through their stimulation of insulin are fattening beyond their contribution of energy as kilocalories. It doesn’t matter how much you eat, so long as you avoid carbs to lose weight. Another growing belief floating mainly around fitness circles is that it’s best to forego foods containing carbs when heading to the gym. It’s for fear that the carbs’ action on insulin will squash fat burning stimulated by exercise. Then again, some low-carb proponents have also argued, physical activity as a means to expend energy for weight management is pointless altogether. Again, carbs are really all that matter because of their action on insulin. Where does all the extra energy from excess protein and fat go when overconsumed? And what about protein’s own effects in stimulating insulin or insulin’s role in promoting satiety? These questions are often overlooked or not easily answered by those that promote the “insulin is a fat storage hormone” proposition. Out to help repair insulin’s reputation is obesity researcher Stepha Continue reading >>

How Artificial Sweeteners Confuse Your Body Into Storing Fat And Inducing Diabetes

How Artificial Sweeteners Confuse Your Body Into Storing Fat And Inducing Diabetes

Research shows that aspartame worsens insulin sensitivity to a greater degree than sugar Artificial sweeteners promote weight gain by tricking your body into thinking it will receive sugar (calories); when the sugar doesn’t arrive, carb cravings can result Artificial sweeteners likely also cause weight gain by disrupting your intestinal microflora, thereby raising your risk of both obesity and diabetes By Dr. Mercola As noted in the featured video, there are currently five different artificial sweeteners on the market. The one you're most likely to encounter is aspartame, which also tends to be the worst of the bunch. Aspartame and other artificial sweeteners are primarily promoted to diabetics and those concerned about their weight. This despite the fact that artificial sweeteners have repeatedly been shown to produce the exact opposite effects: Artificial sweeteners have also been found to promote weight gain, in more ways than one Over time, artificial sweeteners have also crept into a wide variety of products not directly targeting diabetics and dieters. Artificial sweeteners are added to about 6,000 different beverages, snacks, and food products, making label-reading an ever pressing necessity. Disturbingly, food industry groups are now trying to hide the presence of artificial sweeteners in certain foods... Like GMOs, Industry Wants to Hide Artificial Sweeteners in Foods Last year, the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) filed a petition with the FDA requesting the agency amend the standard of identity for milk and 17 other dairy products, in order to allow for the addition of artificial sweeteners without having to indicate their use on the label. The IDFA claims the proposed amendments would "promote more healthful eating practices and reduce childhoo Continue reading >>

High Insulin Levels Stop Fat Loss And Cause Weight Gain

High Insulin Levels Stop Fat Loss And Cause Weight Gain

It is impossible to have high levels of insulin in your system while burning fat at the same time. Think about that. If you eat a meal that has too high of a Glycemic Index, your blood sugar will spike, causing a large release in insulin. During this period of time your body cannot use fat for fuel (even if you are operating under a calorie deficit and even if you workout like crazy). You can get everything else right and not make good progress if you allow your insulin levels to get out of whack. [I would highly recommend you avoid anything made with white flower while dieting down. It is okay once you hit your target weight, but try to avoid it to make quick progress.] I Used to Think a Calorie Deficit Was Enough A while back I used to think that as long as you burned more calories than what you ingested, you would lose weight. This is true to a point…you should lose weight under a calorie deficit. The problem lies in the fact that if you eat a high G.I. carb, you may shut down the body’s ability to burn fat for several hours. Even if you do wind up losing weight, you aren’t following the quickest route to your goal. A Quick Overview of Insulin You probably know what insulin is, but if you don’t here is a quick summary: Insulin is a hormone that causes most of the body’s cells to take up glucose from the blood (including liver, muscle, and fat tissue cells), storing it as glycogen in the liver and muscle, and stops use of fat as an energy source. When insulin is absent (or low), glucose is not taken up by most body cells and the body begins to use fat as an energy source. Insulin and Carbs With a High (GI) Glycemic Index The “Glycemic Index” ranks carbohydrates according to their effect on our blood glucose levels. The rating used to go from 0 to 100…s Continue reading >>

How Elevated Blood Sugar Causes Weight Gain (and What To Do About It)

How Elevated Blood Sugar Causes Weight Gain (and What To Do About It)

High blood sugar is extremely unhealthy and has been exposed in recent years as very damaging to the body. The damage that high blood sugar triggers is involved in the development of nearly all degenerative diseases. Blood sugar is supposed to stay fairly even in a tightly-controlled range, not tumultuous with dramatic spikes and crashes. But often, people eat processed starches and sugary foods that spike their blood sugar and put them at risk of chronic blood glucose elevation. Why High Blood Sugar Is Bad Before we talk about how high blood sugar makes you fat, you should know that it can cause a host of other health problems and damage your body in numerous ways. Here's a small list of possible complications from chronically elevated blood sugar and the damaging inflammation, glycation, and oxidative stress it causes: cardiovascular disease kidney failure cancer blindness obesity diabetes accelerated aging accelerated organ damage Weight Gain and High Blood Sugar There are two primary ways in which high blood sugar causes weight gain: It causes chronically high insulin levels and the loss of insulin sensitivity. Eating food that quickly raises your blood sugar can cause dramatic blood sugar slumps in the hours after, resulting in excessive hunger and overeating (in an attempt to elevate blood sugar back to normal levels). Insulin and Weight Gain Insulin is a hormone that ferries glucose into cells. Insulin is necessary for your body to make use of the sugars and amino acids you eat, so unsurprisingly the insulin level in your blood rises when you eat. But the amount of insulin circulating in your body ranges widely depending on your eating habits. So what does insulin have to do with body fat? Here’s the important thing: insulin is an anabolic, pro-growth, fat-stor Continue reading >>

Weight Loss And Blood Sugar

Weight Loss And Blood Sugar

Click “Play” to Listen Prefer to Download & Save? Right Click Here & “save as” to your computer. Mac users cmd. + click + “save target as”. Listen to Jon Gabriel Teach About: Why regulating your blood sugar is crucial to weight-loss How to get control of your blood sugar level Top tips for keeping up your energy levels and boosting your health OR Read The Lecture Transcripts Here I just wanted to talk a little bit, for starters before we take any callers, about blood sugar. I don’t know if you read the latest newsletter that we sent out, but learning how to regulate your blood sugar is really crucial in losing weight. And when the FAT programs are on, which I talk about in my book, The Gabriel Method, your body loses the ability to regulate its blood sugar properly. And that’s because your body becomes less sensitive to the hormone insulin. So I want to give just a quick talk about how your body normally regulates blood sugar, and what happens when the FAT programs are on, to get your body to no longer be able to regulate blood sugar properly, and why it’s so crucial to be able to regulate your blood sugar and to understand blood sugar if you want to lose weight. So the way your body normally regulates blood sugar, is your body always has to have a certain amount of sugar in your bloodstream at all times to provide energy for your brain and for your muscles and for your liver, and just for basic functioning. If you have too much sugar in your bloodstream, it’s going to cause problems. It can cause nerve damage and it can be extremely detrimental. And if you have too little sugar in your blood, it’s going to make you tired and you’re not going to have enough energy for your brain. So your body always has to keep a certain amount of sugar in your b Continue reading >>

Why Do I Find It So Hard To Lose Weight?

Why Do I Find It So Hard To Lose Weight?

There are lots of myths about weight gain, weight loss and dieting, but the most damaging is that it’s all about willpower. “If only I had a stronger willpower”, people say to themselves, “I would eat more healthily and become slim again”. If you believe that then you will also believe that if you are fat then it is all your own fault. So, you go on a diet and when it fails (which many do) then naturally you blame yourself. You get depressed, gorge on carbs and give up. The fact is that experts who work in weight loss management are well aware that weight loss is about far more than simply trying to eat fewer calories. Most overweight people have a metabolic problem, one that makes them hungry all the time. The normal feedback mechanisms that tell you that you are full no longer work. Willpower fails because you are up against one of the most basic drives we have, hunger. This metabolic problem will not only stop you losing weight, it will also lead to serious health problems such as high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes. Unless you do something about it this is a problem that will get worse over time. Once you solve the metabolic problem (and the good news is that it can be solved) your appetite will shrink and you will find it not only easier to lose weight but to keep it off. It starts with developing Insulin resistance At the heart of weight gain is the hormone, insulin. One of the main reasons why so many people struggle to lose weight is not because they are idle or greedy but because their muscles have become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by your pancreas. It controls your blood sugar levels, but it does far more than that. It also controls fat storage. When you eat a meal, particularly one that is rich in sugary carbs, y Continue reading >>

Coffee Linked To Weight Gain

Coffee Linked To Weight Gain

Can coffee cause weight gain? In some people caffeine can lead to hormonal changes that encourage fat storage. “When you consume caffeine, it sends a message to the pituitary gland in your brain to alert your adrenal glands to make adrenalin,” says Dr Libby Weaver, author of Rushing Woman’s Syndrome. “Your body thinks it is in danger so this causes a ‘fight or flight’ response, which leads your blood sugar to rise to provide you with more energy and in response, you make more insulin to deal with that elevation in blood sugar,” she says. Insulin is a primary fat storage hormone. The effect is highest in sippers downing five or more cups of Joe a day. The evidence According to a study at the Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, mice fed the equivalent of five or more cups of coffee a day quickly developed abnormal retention of fat in their cells and liver and showed a greater insulin resistance. In effect, too much coffee fast ramped up their risk of weight gain and Type 2 diabetes. Tearoom tactics: • Choose low-caffeine teas and drink more herbal teas such as peppermint and chamomile, which are caffeine-free. • After you’ve had your daily coffee, sub in dandelion tea. • Swap tea for a H20 break; you’ll still get the benefit of getting up from your desk and moving and the water will make you feel full and stop you mistaking thirst for hunger (and throwing back a snack you don’t need). Continue reading >>

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Finding Your Trouble Spots You’re trying hard to lose weight. You’ve changed your eating habits, and you’ve been doing more physical activity than you used to. But a few weeks — or even a few months — have gone by, and the scale isn’t budging. “Why?!” you ask in frustration. “What am I doing wrong?!” Body weight is regulated mainly by the number of calories consumed and the number of calories burned off. But there are a number of other things that influence weight, and some of them can make it difficult to lose weight. This article explores what some of these are and how to overcome them. As you make the effort to lose weight, be sure you are aiming for a realistic body weight for you. A starting point for determining this is body-mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat based on height and weight. You can calculate your BMI easily with an online tool such as the one at www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi. (Note that there’s a separate BMI calculator for children and teens.) Generally, a BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is considered normal, between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight, and 30 and higher is considered obese. However, BMI tends to overestimate body fat in athletes and other muscular people and to underestimate it in older people who have lost muscle mass. There is also some evidence that the negative health effects of overweight start at a lower BMI for Asian people. Keep in mind, too, that people come in different shapes and sizes. You don’t necessarily have to be “thin” to be healthy, but losing some excess fat can improve your health in a number of ways. Talk to your health-care team about your weight-loss goals and about what a healthy weight is for you. Frequent hypoglycemia Frequent episodes of hypoglycemia, or low blood glu Continue reading >>

Science Confirms It: Carbs Don’t Make You Fat

Science Confirms It: Carbs Don’t Make You Fat

Cutting carbs is the most important change for weight loss. At least, that’s the idea sold by Gary Taubes, Dr. David Ludwig and other low carb enthusiasts. They believe carbohydrate drives obesity because it raises the hormone insulin. Insulin is said to block the release of fat and also drive additional fat storage. However, nutrition research continually shows that carbs alone DON’T make you fat. The latest clinical trial is no exception. You probably already see my stance on this. But let’s put our personal food ideologies aside for a moment to honestly consider the weight of evidence available. If you prefer to watch: Cutting Carbs Does Not Increase Metabolism or Fat Loss If raised insulin drives weight gain, then conversely, reduced insulin (from cutting carbs) should be therapeutic. In other words, we’d expect an extremely low carb diet to cause more fat loss than a typical Western diet. The latest trial to compare these two eating patterns – ironically funded by Taubes’ own NuSI organisation – indicates this is not true. Study Design This was a tightly-controlled, metabolic ward trial, which means no cheating on the diet. For 4 consecutive weeks, 16 overweight or obese men were fed a standard American diet, quite high in carbs (50% Carbohydrate, 15 % Protein, 35% Fat). According to the sample menu published, it included loads of refined carbs including lemonade, granola bars, pretzel sticks and sandwich bread. Participants were then immediately switched to a very low carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (5% Carbohydrate, 15% Protein, 80% Fat) for another 4 weeks (1). Both the high carb diet and the ketogenic diet were equal in calories and protein, and they had no access to any outside foods for the entire 8 week period. Participants also rode an exercise b Continue reading >>

Increased Blood Sugar & Weight Gain

Increased Blood Sugar & Weight Gain

The pervasiveness of weight gain that causes people to become overweight or obese is a major medical concern. More than one-third of adults in the United States were obese in 2011-2012, according to a February 2014 report in "JAMA." Being overweight or obese predisposes people to a host of medical complications, one of the most serious of which is type 2 diabetes. Among other things, substantial weight gain can lead to insulin resistance, a condition in which your body doesn’t respond normally to the blood-sugar-lowering hormone insulin. Insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing prediabetes and, ultimately, type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Video of the Day Weight gain occurs due to excess calorie consumption. Your body requires a certain number calories daily to fuel its many functions. When you exceed this amount, your body stores the extra intake as fat. While you might notice excess body fat in unwanted places, such as your face or hips, it's stored in many body sites. As reported in a December 2008 "Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America" article, when your body stores fat in muscle and the liver, it substantially increases the risk of insulin resistance. With this condition, body tissues respond sluggishly to insulin, leading to high blood sugar. It is important to note, however, that not everyone who consumes excess calories develops insulin resistance. But people who are overweight or obese are at increased risk. The type of fat in the foods you consume is believed to be extremely important in influencing the likelihood of diabetes development. Fat itself isn’t bad, in moderation. But the amount and type of fat you routinely consume can put you at risk for weight gain and diabetes. A diet high in saturated fats -- primarily from animal-bas Continue reading >>

The Real Reason You're Not Losing Weight

The Real Reason You're Not Losing Weight

Is your blood sugar blocking your efforts to shed pounds? The diabetes-weight connection is trickier than you think. Getty ImagesYou probably know that weight gain ups your risk of diseases like diabetes. But you might not realize how complicated that link really is, says Osama Hamdy, MD, medical director of the obesity clinical program at Joslin diabetes center in Boston and author of The Diabetes Breakthrough. "The cycle starts when you gain weight," Dr. Hamdy says. The kicker is that once you have blood sugar problems, it's much harder to do the one thing that can really help: slim down. That may be why the majority of people with type 2 diabetesabout 80 percentare overweight or obese. The good news: dropping pounds is not impossible if you understand the complex dance between blood sugar, belly fat and insulinand how to interrupt it. The Vicious Cycle, Explained Every time you eat, your pancreas produces insulin. This hormone helps your body harness the energy provided by food by "unlocking" your cells, helping to move sugar (aka glucose) inside each one, where it's used for fuel. The problem starts with insulin resistance, in which your cells no longer respond to the hormone. Weight gain can bring it on, especially if you add visceral fat (the kind around your abdominal organs) because it churns out inflammatory chemicals that harm cells' response to insulin. Think of your body as a car, says David G. Marrero, PhD, president of health care and education at the American diabetes association. "Fill the trunk with 500 pounds of gravel and it's harder to run. It needs more gas and it wears out the engine to get the same level of performance." That's obesity. "Now think of insulin as the gas line between the fuel tank and the engine. Insulin resistance squeezes it, so w Continue reading >>

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