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How Do Insulin Spikes Cause Weight Gain?

“fight The Spike” To Avoid Weight Gain?

“fight The Spike” To Avoid Weight Gain?

Blood sugar levels usually go up after eating, thus creating a blood sugar spike. For most healthy people, post-meal blood sugar levels do not go up very high or for long. But if your post-meal blood sugar spikes go up too high and too often, your chance of weight gain greatly increases. What’s a Spike? Depending on the type and amount of carbohydrates eaten during a meal, peak blood sugar levels can go up to 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) or more. Most refined carbohydrates (ones that have been processed and stripped of the bran and germ from the whole grain, such as white rice, pasta and bread made with white flour) create a faster spike in blood sugar levels. While unrefined carbohydrates (ones that are not processed, such as whole grains) create a slower spike. In response to rising blood sugar levels, the body produces insulin to bring glucose back down to fasting levels, or even lower. This usually happens within about 60 minutes after eating. This whole process is called “postprandial blood sugar fluctuation” or “glucose excursion” among the medical community. For most of us, it’s simply known as post-meal blood sugar spike. How A Blood Sugar Spike Can Cause Weight Gain Scientific studies have shown that post-meal spikes in your blood sugar can cause of weight gain. This is for three reasons: The higher the spike, the more insulin secretion; insulin increases fat tissue and promotes weight gain. The body burns fat, a process called fatty acid oxidation, all the time. However, in a high post-meal spike situation, the body stops fatty acid oxidation and initiates carbohydrate oxidation instead. That means the body stops burning fat. After eating a high-carbohydrate meal (especially one that contains refined carbohydrates), a big post-meal blood su Continue reading >>

Weight Loss And Blood Sugar

Weight Loss And Blood Sugar

Click “Play” to Listen Prefer to Download & Save? Right Click Here & “save as” to your computer. Mac users cmd. + click + “save target as”. Listen to Jon Gabriel Teach About: Why regulating your blood sugar is crucial to weight-loss How to get control of your blood sugar level Top tips for keeping up your energy levels and boosting your health OR Read The Lecture Transcripts Here I just wanted to talk a little bit, for starters before we take any callers, about blood sugar. I don’t know if you read the latest newsletter that we sent out, but learning how to regulate your blood sugar is really crucial in losing weight. And when the FAT programs are on, which I talk about in my book, The Gabriel Method, your body loses the ability to regulate its blood sugar properly. And that’s because your body becomes less sensitive to the hormone insulin. So I want to give just a quick talk about how your body normally regulates blood sugar, and what happens when the FAT programs are on, to get your body to no longer be able to regulate blood sugar properly, and why it’s so crucial to be able to regulate your blood sugar and to understand blood sugar if you want to lose weight. So the way your body normally regulates blood sugar, is your body always has to have a certain amount of sugar in your bloodstream at all times to provide energy for your brain and for your muscles and for your liver, and just for basic functioning. If you have too much sugar in your bloodstream, it’s going to cause problems. It can cause nerve damage and it can be extremely detrimental. And if you have too little sugar in your blood, it’s going to make you tired and you’re not going to have enough energy for your brain. So your body always has to keep a certain amount of sugar in your b Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Affects Hunger, Weight Gain, And Energy Levels Fact

Blood Sugar Affects Hunger, Weight Gain, And Energy Levels Fact

Blood sugar affects hunger, weight gain, and energy levels. Thus, sugars and simple carbs can give you the munchies and affect weight gain. How Blood Sugar (Glucose) Affects Insulin, Hunger, Weight Gain, and Energy Levels In a normal healthy human, in general, factoring out other complexities like other food and drink eaten with a meal: Carbohydrates (especially simple ones like sugars) “spike” blood sugar (glucose) levels. This triggers insulin production causes hunger, and primes the body for weight gain. It also creates a quick energy spike followed by a quick crash. This is perfect for storing calories from fruit sugars in the wild, but not so great for modern snacking habits, weight gain, and the munchies.[1] This can be offset by eating fiber, protein, and a generally balanced diet, and can differ in those with medical problems, but, in simple terms, the general rule of thumb for a normal healthy adult would be: Sugar can give you the munchies and cause weight gain. It does little to relieve your hunger pangs. The two videos below explain how sugar “spikes insulin” and causes weight gain. See below for further science and insight. The Skinny on Obesity (Ep. 3): Hunger and Hormones- A Vicious Cycle. This video also describes leptin which is a hormone that helps suppress hunger. It sends a message from your fat cells to your brain to tell your brain you are full, insulin suppresses leptin. The Skinny on Obesity (Ep. 4): Sugar – A Sweet Addiction. This video describes other effects of sugar. FACT: For the average person controlling weight may be a matter of determination. However, there are many additional considerations depending on a range of health factors. For instance, some genetic conditions such as Prader-Willi syndrome impact appetite so strongly th Continue reading >>

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Finding Your Trouble Spots You’re trying hard to lose weight. You’ve changed your eating habits, and you’ve been doing more physical activity than you used to. But a few weeks — or even a few months — have gone by, and the scale isn’t budging. “Why?!” you ask in frustration. “What am I doing wrong?!” Body weight is regulated mainly by the number of calories consumed and the number of calories burned off. But there are a number of other things that influence weight, and some of them can make it difficult to lose weight. This article explores what some of these are and how to overcome them. As you make the effort to lose weight, be sure you are aiming for a realistic body weight for you. A starting point for determining this is body-mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat based on height and weight. You can calculate your BMI easily with an online tool such as the one at www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi. (Note that there’s a separate BMI calculator for children and teens.) Generally, a BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is considered normal, between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight, and 30 and higher is considered obese. However, BMI tends to overestimate body fat in athletes and other muscular people and to underestimate it in older people who have lost muscle mass. There is also some evidence that the negative health effects of overweight start at a lower BMI for Asian people. Keep in mind, too, that people come in different shapes and sizes. You don’t necessarily have to be “thin” to be healthy, but losing some excess fat can improve your health in a number of ways. Talk to your health-care team about your weight-loss goals and about what a healthy weight is for you. Frequent hypoglycemia Frequent episodes of hypoglycemia, or low blood glu Continue reading >>

Insulin Causes Weight Gain – Hormonal Obesity Iv

Insulin Causes Weight Gain – Hormonal Obesity Iv

In our previous post, we were reviewing the link between insulin and obesity. It appears that insulin is not merely associated with obesity but causes obesity. Click here for Hormonal Obesity Part I, Part II, and Part III. For decades we believed the Caloric Reduction as Primary (CRaP) hypothesis of obesity that turned out to be as useful as a half-built bridge. Study after study showed that reducing calories did NOT lead to weight loss. Patient after patient tried to lose weight by restricting calories with consistent failure. But we couldn’t abandon the calorie model so what was left to do? Blame the patient, of course! Since patients were not losing weight, there was only 2 possibilities. Either the advice to eat a low fat, calorie restricted diet and exercise more was wrong or the patient was not following this advice. So the doctors and dieticians berated, ridiculed, belittled, rebuked, chided and reprimanded. We said – Eat less, Move more – as if that would cure their problems. After all, the food pyramid couldn’t be wrong, could it? But the excess weight was still as persistent as a nagging tooth. Doctors, of course, were drawn to this CRaP hypothesis as bathers to a seashore. Obesity was now not our failure to understand it, but their lack of willpower and/or laziness (gluttony or sloth). It was our favourite game – blame the patient. But, of course, the problem was the CRaP hypothesis. It was just wrong. Increased calories did not cause obesity so reducing calories didn’t cause weight loss. Exercise didn’t work either, as we will see in a future series. So, what was the real aetiology of obesity? Insulin. What happens when we give high doses of insulin to patients? Insulin makes you gain weight. The more insulin you take, the more weight you gain. Continue reading >>

Does High Insulin Cause Weight Gain?

Does High Insulin Cause Weight Gain?

Tweet Does high insulin cause weight gain? Over the years Americans have been getting higher fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c blood levels. A study from Life Extension Magazine showed 66% higher than desired fasting insulin. Twenty-Two percent had hemoglobin A1c levels that placed them in a pre-diabetic state. Hemoglobin A1c measures the percentage of glycated hemoglobin in one’s blood. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be below 5.6% yet more than one in five people test over 6%. Gaining access to this kind of information can prevent severe diabetic related illness. Insulin is a hormone that regulates carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Insulin enables liver and muscle cells to take up blood sugar (glucose) for energy production or storage. Insulin also helps to pack glucose into the fat cells as triglycerides. Once a burst of insulin is released in response to food ingestion, insulin levels should drop below 5 uIU/ml and only a small amount of insulin should be needed to maintain balance. When the fasting insulin levels are above 5 uIU/ml, this indicates a pre-diabetic state that increases the risk of degenerative disease. In people with metabolic disorders or obesity insulin levels remain elevated. While this creates cellular damage it also prevents weight loss by forcing glucose into the fat cells as storage. In a condition called hyperinsulinemia the pancreas stimulates the uptake of glucose from blood into the body’s cells. The inability of the body’s cells to utilize the insulin is called insulin resistance. In hyperinsulinemia the pancreas produces more insulin than normal so there are higher levels of insulin circulating in the blood stream. Normally to process 10mg of sugar a person would have to produce one unit of insulin, but in a person with hyperinsulinemi Continue reading >>

Science Confirms It: Carbs Don’t Make You Fat

Science Confirms It: Carbs Don’t Make You Fat

Cutting carbs is the most important change for weight loss. At least, that’s the idea sold by Gary Taubes, Dr. David Ludwig and other low carb enthusiasts. They believe carbohydrate drives obesity because it raises the hormone insulin. Insulin is said to block the release of fat and also drive additional fat storage. However, nutrition research continually shows that carbs alone DON’T make you fat. The latest clinical trial is no exception. You probably already see my stance on this. But let’s put our personal food ideologies aside for a moment to honestly consider the weight of evidence available. If you prefer to watch: Cutting Carbs Does Not Increase Metabolism or Fat Loss If raised insulin drives weight gain, then conversely, reduced insulin (from cutting carbs) should be therapeutic. In other words, we’d expect an extremely low carb diet to cause more fat loss than a typical Western diet. The latest trial to compare these two eating patterns – ironically funded by Taubes’ own NuSI organisation – indicates this is not true. Study Design This was a tightly-controlled, metabolic ward trial, which means no cheating on the diet. For 4 consecutive weeks, 16 overweight or obese men were fed a standard American diet, quite high in carbs (50% Carbohydrate, 15 % Protein, 35% Fat). According to the sample menu published, it included loads of refined carbs including lemonade, granola bars, pretzel sticks and sandwich bread. Participants were then immediately switched to a very low carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (5% Carbohydrate, 15% Protein, 80% Fat) for another 4 weeks (1). Both the high carb diet and the ketogenic diet were equal in calories and protein, and they had no access to any outside foods for the entire 8 week period. Participants also rode an exercise b Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

I recently was included in a discussion on a Facebook group for athletes with diabetes about how hard it can be to lose weight through exercise. While I would never claim to have all the answers on this topic, here are some ideas about what can make you gain weight or keep you from losing weight with diabetes, based on my decades of professional and personal experience with diabetes and weight management, and what you can do about it. Insulin My former graduate student with type 1 diabetes went on an insulin pump and promptly gained about 10 pounds, even though his blood glucose control improved only marginally. Why did this happen to him (and why does it happen to so many other insulin users)? As a naturally occurring anabolic hormone, insulin promotes the uptake and storage of glucose, amino acids, and fat into insulin-sensitive cells around your body (mainly muscle and fat cells). It doesn’t matter whether it’s released naturally, injected, or pumped—all insulin and insulin analogues have these same effects. Going on intensive insulin therapy is associated with fat weight gain (1), for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Some of the weight gain comes from that if you’re using insulin to keep your blood glucose in control, you’ll be keeping and storing all of the calories that you’re eating instead of losing some glucose through urine (during hyperglycemia). Unfortunately, this realization has led some people to try skipping or limiting their insulin use to help them lose weight (2), but that is a dangerous practice that can lead to loss of excess muscle mass and life-threatening conditions like DKA. The best way to balance your insulin use and your body weight, in my opinion, is to be physically active to keep your overall insulin levels lower. I Continue reading >>

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Cliff Scherb Editor’s Note: Cliff Scherb, Founder of Glucose Advisors and TriStar Athletes LLC, is a nutrition and fitness expert. He consults through virtually teaching his decision support system – Engine1 the app and its methodologies to aspiring T1 individuals and athletes. Cliff also creates custom training programs and insulin plans for endurance athletes, using Training Stress Modeling and real-time coaching. To inquire about coaching openings, FB LIVE sessions, and general questions please email [email protected] Losing weight can be difficult — add Type 1 diabetes to the mix with its daily management demands — and it’s even more of a challenge. I know, because I’ve been a Type 1 diabetic for 29 years and I’m also an endurance athlete. The internet is saturated in advice on how to lose weight with or without Type 1, so it’s hard to know what is worth while and what will just waste your time — or worse, can negatively impact your health. I’m not going to declare all out war on carbohydrates, or tell you can or can’t drink your calories in the form of olive oil, or feast and fast with cayenne peppers and maple syrup. No, the real distilled learning from my years of consulting and data analysis shows that a balanced, low-insulin diet with nutrient timing and activity is the best way to lose weight with Type 1 diabetes. It also helps you maintain brain and body function as well as energy levels. If you are reading this you’ve probably already given this some thought and know why it’s important to lose weight and/or lean out, but I maintain it’s all about performance! Performing means living a longer or healthier life or if you’re an athlete, it can also translate to beating out your competition. Things that Impact w Continue reading >>

The Insulin & Fat Storage Myth

The Insulin & Fat Storage Myth

There is a lot of talk on this theory that insulin causes you to gain weight. The basic idea is that certain foods can cause your blood sugar to spike thus signaling your pancreas to secrete more insulin. This insulin shuttles that sugar into your fat cells and you gain weight. Another part of this theory says that since your spike in blood sugar was so sharp your body might shuttle too much sugar out of your blood and your blood sugar levels drop causing hunger so you eat insulin spiking foods once again and the cycle repeats itself until you’re fat, sick and feeling out of control. Like many theories in diet and fitness, it has a lot of truth to it, but there are quite a few holes to the theory and a lot of fine print as to what’s really going on. True parts of the theory #1- Some foods can influence a spike in blood sugar. There is no doubt that certain foods are digested at different rates and along different pathways in the body. Any basic knowledge of human digestion will simply point out that some foods break down and digest faster than others. It is certainly true that simple carbohydrates and sugars tend to break down faster and are entered into the bloodstream at a quicker rate thus raising your blood sugar. #2- Insulin does shuttle sugar out of your blood. Your blood sugar level is incredibly important towards your health and well-being. Insulin is not a bad hormone because you need it in order to survive. It’s primary role is in fact to pull sugar out of the bloodstream when there is too much of it there. #3- Certain foods do digest faster and may cause you to become hungry again much quicker. Since it is true that certain foods digest and break down quicker it’s also true that some foods have less sticking power and helping you feel full longer. Sim Continue reading >>

Insulin And Fat Storage

Insulin And Fat Storage

We left off last week with the question, “What prevents fat from leaving the fat cell?” If you missed out on it, you may want to read The Futility of Low-Calorie Diets. To quickly recap, we talked about the fact that your body has two main fuels: glucose (sugar) or fat. The preferred source of fuel is fat, but under certain circumstances, we can shift the body to using more sugar rather than fat. At times, such as being chased by a rabid dog, this is a good thing. However, it’s not a good thing if sugar remains the main fuel for most of the day. Relying on sugar means you’re not burning fat. Many people make lifestyle choices and nutrition decisions that have basically locked up their extra stored fat in their fat cells, making it useless for energy. The only way you can lose fat is if you use fat. You’ll be unsuccessful at losing fat if you don’t burn fat, even if you eat fewer calories and burn more through exercise. You can lose weight, but most of the loss will come from lean body mass, or muscle tissue, not fat. Fat Storage and Insulin The most significant factor in fat storage is the level of insulin in the blood. Insulin has many effects on the body. With respect to fat storage, insulin increases the storage of fat in fat cells and prevents fat cells from releasing fat for energy. This is such a key point for people to understand that I’ll repeat it: Insulin increases the storage of fat in fat cells and prevents the cells from releasing it for energy. Eight hormones stimulate fat utilization: epinephrine, norepinephrine, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), glucagon, thyroid-stimulating hormone, melanocyte-stimulating hormone, vasopressin and growth hormone. One hormone prevents fat utilization: insulin. The pancreas releases insulin when blood suga Continue reading >>

Key To Lasting Weight Loss Is Understanding Insulin

Key To Lasting Weight Loss Is Understanding Insulin

About one-third of U.S. children and more than two-thirds of U.S. adults are either overweight or obese, according to the National Institute of Health. It’s no secret that Americans are suffering an obesity epidemic, but a solution to the problem remains elusive. Since 1980, obesity rates among adults have more than doubled. And for children, they have more than tripled. We’re told that if we just eat less and exercise more, the weight will come off, but for many it’s not so easy. Millions of people restrict their calories for months or years, only to gain it all back and more. We are a culture obsessed with dieting, yet people just keep getting fatter. According to Dr. Charles Nguyen, a psychiatrist and medical director at the Lorphen Medical Weight Loss Clinic in California, the secret to sustainable weight loss is actually more about understanding chemistry than exercising willpower. He says that one chemical in particular, insulin, can make all the difference between burning fat and packing on the pounds. With insulin as the focus, Nguyen has developed a new weight loss-program with his brother, bariatric specialist Tu Song-Anh Nguyen. Their new book is called “The Thinsulin Program.” “Thinsulin” is a hybrid word that combines “thin,” “think,” and “insulin.” The program pairs the physiological science of weight loss with the psychological aspect necessary for lasting change. The idea behind the Thinsulin Program is that once we truly understand the hormonal mechanism that makes us fat, we will be motivated to make better choices. The Epoch Times talked to Dr. Charles Nguyen about his weight-loss program and why most diets are doomed to fail. Epoch Times: Why should people think about insulin if they want to lose weight? Dr. Charles Nguyen: Continue reading >>

Carbs Aren't Making You Fat - The Truth About Insulin

Carbs Aren't Making You Fat - The Truth About Insulin

Is the insulin spike from ingesting carbohydrates the reason for fat gain? Read this article for everything you need to know about how insulin works! Broscientist: “Hey man, you gotta go low carb to get shredded” Friend of Broscientist: “Why is that?” Broscientist: “Because carbs cause an insulin spike and insulin tells your body to store fat. If you go low carb your body will just burn fat all the time and you will get super lean. I mean I haven’t had a carb in 2 years and look how lean and jacked I am” (*Raises shirt to reveal a blurry 2 pack*). Friend of Broscientist: “Shoot, better stop eating my oatmeal for breakfast if I want to get abs”. Conversations like these are heard in gyms, locker rooms, and college campuses across America. Every time one of these conversations takes place gains are lost and a scientist cringes. The notion that low carb diets are the key to getting lean and that carbs are what cause fat gain is based on an argument that goes as follows: dietary carbohydrates cause an insulin response; insulin can tell fat cells to store fat; therefore dietary carbohydrates cause fat storage. Common reading literature such as Good Calories, Bad Calories have put the hormonal regulation of body fat into limelight. In books such as GCBC, insulin is painted as the primary cause of common obesity. While it is true that hormones play a critical part in the regulation of body-fat, it is naïve to single out insulin as the sole contributor. Why is it naïve? Well for one our endocrine system is extremely robust with almost countless signaling molecules. While insulin plays a critical part in substrate partitioning and metabolism (including the fate of fat and carbohydrates), it plays only one part in the signaling cascade. To really understand wh Continue reading >>

How Artificial Sweeteners Confuse Your Body Into Storing Fat And Inducing Diabetes

How Artificial Sweeteners Confuse Your Body Into Storing Fat And Inducing Diabetes

Research shows that aspartame worsens insulin sensitivity to a greater degree than sugar Artificial sweeteners promote weight gain by tricking your body into thinking it will receive sugar (calories); when the sugar doesn’t arrive, carb cravings can result Artificial sweeteners likely also cause weight gain by disrupting your intestinal microflora, thereby raising your risk of both obesity and diabetes By Dr. Mercola As noted in the featured video, there are currently five different artificial sweeteners on the market. The one you're most likely to encounter is aspartame, which also tends to be the worst of the bunch. Aspartame and other artificial sweeteners are primarily promoted to diabetics and those concerned about their weight. This despite the fact that artificial sweeteners have repeatedly been shown to produce the exact opposite effects: Artificial sweeteners have also been found to promote weight gain, in more ways than one Over time, artificial sweeteners have also crept into a wide variety of products not directly targeting diabetics and dieters. Artificial sweeteners are added to about 6,000 different beverages, snacks, and food products, making label-reading an ever pressing necessity. Disturbingly, food industry groups are now trying to hide the presence of artificial sweeteners in certain foods... Like GMOs, Industry Wants to Hide Artificial Sweeteners in Foods Last year, the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) filed a petition with the FDA requesting the agency amend the standard of identity for milk and 17 other dairy products, in order to allow for the addition of artificial sweeteners without having to indicate their use on the label. The IDFA claims the proposed amendments would "promote more healthful eating practices and reduce childhoo Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And Weight Loss

Insulin Resistance And Weight Loss

Insulin resistance and weight loss… How are they related? Insulin resistance is related to diabetes, a condition that keeps your body from producing or using its insulin effectively, and it can make it incredibly difficult to lose weight. A heads up before reading this article: The terms ‘diabetes‘ and ‘prediabetes‘ are discussed a lot in this article. Even if you don’t have either of these conditions, don’t dismiss the information in this article. Here’s why. Insulin resistance, left unchecked, can LEAD to diabetes. It’s the first step in those that become prediabetic and eventually diabetic, and it’s VERY important to reverse insulin resistance so that you don’t become diabetic. Insulin resistance and diabetes is unfortunately common in today’s world, and untold numbers of adults are prediabetic, often without knowing it. If you’ve already received a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or you’ve struggled throughout your life with type 1, you may have a deeper understanding of the constant struggle to maintain proper insulin levels. Here is the problem: Insulin resistance can cause weight gain and make it VERY difficult to lose weight. The way your body breaks down sugar dictates whether you gain, maintain, or lose pounds. To get a better understanding of this sadly all-too-common condition, let’s discuss what insulin resistance is, how this condition arises, and what you can to do successfully lose weight while managing this complication. What Causes Insulin Resistance? I’m going to put this in laymen’s terms so as to avoid getting too scientific (we’ll outline some more of the scientific details in the next section). Insulin resistance is sadly a self-inflicted wound and even sadder is the fact that most people have no idea that they are Continue reading >>

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