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How Can Insulin Kill You

Hackers Can Make Your Pacemaker Or Your Insulin Pump Kill You – And The Nhs Needs To Respond To That Threat

Hackers Can Make Your Pacemaker Or Your Insulin Pump Kill You – And The Nhs Needs To Respond To That Threat

In one sense we can be grateful to the hackers who launched the WannaCry virus which led to one of the most devastating cyber attacks on the NHS to date. It proved that cyber-security is not just about keeping data safe. It is about keeping patients safe. This is often missing from discussions about cyber-security. The investigation by the National Audit Office, published on Friday, revealed that the NHS was much harder hit than at first thought, with more than one in three NHS trusts affected, 19,000 appointments cancelled and almost 600 GP practices disrupted. It could have been worse. If the attack had happened on a Monday at the start of the week rather than, as it happened, on a Friday, far more patients would have been affected. It was only stopped when 22-year-old cyber-security researcher Marcus Hutchins stumbled on a “kill switch” which he activated from his bedroom in Devon, disabling the virus. It was not the first time the NHS has succumbed to an attack – and it will not be the last. Hundreds of operations and outpatient appointments were cancelled across Lincolnshire in 2016 after the local NHS trust fell victim to a virus. Freedom of Information requests to NHS trusts in 2015-16 revealed that as many as half were hit by ransomware in the preceding year. And this week hackers targeted the London Bridge Plastic Surgery clinic and its celebrity client list and threatened to release photos of the procedures undertaken. Healthcare is one of the most targeted sectors globally by cyber-criminals for two simple reasons: it is a rich source of data and a soft target. Medical records are worth more than credit card details on the dark web because they contain personal identifying details that can be used to open bank accounts, obtain loans or acquire a passpor Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: A Killing Dose Of Insulin

Ask D'mine: A Killing Dose Of Insulin

Hey, All: if you've got questions about life with diabetes, then you've come to the right place! That would be our weekly diabetes advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and clinical specialist Wil Dubois. Today, Wil tackles a very serious question that we hope is just one of genuine curiosity. It's about suicide, a sensitive topic to be approached with the utmost caution. Read on to see how Wil responds... {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Anonymous, type 1 from California, asks: How much insulin would you need to take to kill yourself? [email protected] D’Mine answers: First off, don’t kill yourself. Second off, if you are determined to do it, don’t use insulin. It’s slow and unreliable, with a distinct risk that the attempt will leave you permanently damaged, rather than dead. More on that in a bit. But first, let’s start the day by talking about the different ways to end your day. The Wikipedia entry on suicide methods lists the following ways to usher yourself out of this world: Bleeding, drowning, suffocation, hypothermia, electrocution, jumping from height, using a firearm, hanging, ligature compression, vehicular impact from trains or cars, taking poison, not treating a disease, immolation (including throwing oneself into a volcano), starvation, dehydration, and suicide attack—sometimes called Suicide by Cop. The entry even includes a discussion on the use of homemade guillotines as a way of suicide. But no mention of insulin. That’s odd. Or maybe not, because, as I mentioned, insulin is a crappy tool to try to use to kill yourself. Not surprisingly, studies of insulin suicides are somewhat scarce, but one looked at 160 insulin suicide attempts and found that 94.7% of the PWDs fully recovered, 2.7% Continue reading >>

Always Hungry? How To Kill Your Sugar Addiction Before It Kills You.

Always Hungry? How To Kill Your Sugar Addiction Before It Kills You.

Always hungry? Do you have a hard time skipping a meal? Are you craving sweetness after every meal? Are you fighting with skin problems such as acne or skin tags? Have you gained weight recently? Love handles perhaps? Is your energy at an all-time low? Or have you lost hair, libido or satiation? If you said yes to two or more of the questions above, chances are you‘re developing a sugar addiction. Don’t worry; it’s not your fault! I know you’re not putting sugar cubes in your mouth. But sugars are hiding in bread, milk, tomato sauce, drinks, and pasta too! We’re biologically wired to crave sweetness, and with so much sugar around these days, we’re bound to get trapped in its shackles. After a chronic consumption of high sugar and fast carbs, your body thinks it’s become dependent on sweetness to function but just doesn’t metabolize it anymore. Excess sugar makes your cells insulin resistant: sugar can no longer enter your cells and is stored as fat instead. No need to panic just yet! Everything our body does is a way to protect itself or prepare itself for a difficult situation. You do have the power to reverse the effects of chronic sugar consumption before it is too late! How A Healthy Body Works: A Beautiful Energy Factory What Is Sugar? You find sugars in carbohydrates. We can classify carbohydrates into “simple” and “complex”. Simple Carbohydrates: The most basic units of carbohydrates are monosaccharides, such as glucose and fructose (fruit sugars). These simple sugars immediately enter the bloodstream via the gut cells because of their singular molecular structure. Table sugar is sucrose. Together with maltose and lactose, they fall in the carb category as disaccharides. Your body needs to split disaccharides into singular fructose- and gl Continue reading >>

Death By Insulin: How Sweet It Isn't!!

Death By Insulin: How Sweet It Isn't!!

Case Study S. P. was a nurse who had a long history of depression. She had stopped her medication several months ago since her life had stabilized. However, with the discovery of her husband having an affair, a setback at work, and the terminal illness of her mother, she soon began to have feelings of unworthiness and hopelessness. She was working for a home health agency and was involved in the care of an elderly woman who had a heart condition brought on by her long history of insulin dependent diabetes. Her patient had just received her three month supply of quick-acting insulin. S.P. decided to take one of the bottles and in the privacy of her home she injected herself with the entire contents. Within several minutes she began to feel hungry, nervous, sweaty, shaky, and very weak. This rapidly progressed to her feeling dizzy, disoriented and confused, ultimately resulting in drowsiness, unconsciousness, coma, and finally death. Why did she die? Cause of Death? If your answer to this question is that S.P died from an overdose of insulin, I suppose you are right. After all that’s what I would put on the death certificate. But what I’m really looking for here is the mechanism underlying the cause of death. Only by understanding the pathophysiology of disease, dysfunction, and death, can one begin to appreciate the complexity of life and how easy it is for us to die and fall off the radar screen for the survival of the fittest. The strength of a chain is only as good as its weakest link. In the case here of S.P, most people who are familiar with diabetes and insulin realize that since insulin is a hormone that is needed to keep the blood sugar (glucose) from going too high, then taking too much of it can cause a person’s blood sugar to drop too low. That’s exact Continue reading >>

Woman Kills Herself By Insulin Overdose

Woman Kills Herself By Insulin Overdose

“I LOVE you” were the last words a diabetic woman wrote in a suicide note to her step-daughter before killing herself with an insulin overdose. Andrea Smith had already tried to kill herself once with an insulin overdose in the months leading up to her death, aged 45, on August 8 last year, Aberdare Coroner’s Court was told. She had attempted to take her own life in May 2008 with insulin and tablets, which had led to her month-long admission to Royal Glamorgan Hospital’s psychiatric ward. In a statement read to the court, step-daughter Susan Davies said that on that occasion she had found her step-mother sitting grey-faced on the bed with eight empty insulin pens by her side. “She said that I had caught her in time but that next time I would not be so lucky,” said Susan. She had called into her step-mother’s home at Cae Glas, Penrhiwfer, Tonypandy, after concerned neighbours contacted her to say the cat was crying outside and had been there for some time, which was unusual. Andrea, a cashier at a local petrol station, was discharged in June and was under the care of a crisis team who made several visits a week. The court heard she had a history of depression for which she was receiving medication, and stomach problems and was receiving treatment for a hernia. She had become depressed following her mother’s death in 2005 and was also upset because her dog had died and she had taken it badly. Susan said she was in regular touch with Andrea. She said that her step-mother and father had not been getting on well and on the Tuesday before the death he had taken his wife to work for the night shift and by the time she returned, he was gone. Susan took her to work the following day. “She was laughing and joking and she said that she had to be strong,” said S Continue reading >>

Avoiding Hypos

Avoiding Hypos

Successfully treating diabetes while avoiding hypoglycemia is the goal of every living creature suffering from the disease. Though Drs. Fleeman and Rand wrote the article focusing on diabetic dogs, much of the advice applies to all pets with diabetes. When in doubt, DON'T! If there's ever any confusion about whether or not insulin was administered, the injection should be omitted [1]. Missing one shot will not harm your pet [2][3], while hypoglycemia can kill.[4] If a dosage looks wrong to you, DON'T BE AFRAID to ask someone for help--your vet, an animal emergency clinic, or a canine [5] diabetes message board--BEFORE you give an injection of a questionable dose. Delaying a shot if you're not sure is much safer than the alternative. From the DVM 360 2007 article by Dr. Audrey Cook: [6][7] "Hypoglycemia is deadly; hyperglycemia is not. Owners must clearly understand that too much insulin can kill, and that they should call a veterinarian or halve the dose if they have any concerns about a pet's well-being or appetite. Tell owners to offer food immediately if the pet is weak or is behaving strangely." If you have only administered a portion of the insulin injection, do not try giving more. You are not certain actually how much insulin really went where it was meant to. Trying to draw more to make up for the error may result in a total of too much insulin being given--the result being hypoglycemia. [8] The effect could be something like hypoglycemia caused by insulin stacking (see section below). Even if every last drop from the syringe went into the fur and not under the skin, the safest thing to do is to leave it at that, not giving any insulin until the next scheduled dose is due. Missing one shot will not result in permanent damage nor will it mean that your regulated Continue reading >>

Insulin Poisoning With Suicidal Intent

Insulin Poisoning With Suicidal Intent

Go to: A 27-year-old paramedical personnel without any comorbidities, working as an assistant in the operation theater, was found to be drowsy and drenched in sweat with bradycardia (34 beats/min) and hypotension (80/50 mm of Hg). She was immediately shifted to ICU. She was pale and there was no cyanosis, icterus, clubbing, lymphadenopathy, or any evidence of external injury. Temperature was 99.0°F, with a respiratory rate of 20/min and cold peripheries. Pupils were bilateral 3 mm, reactive to light, and oculocephalic reflex was preserved. Deep tendon reflexes were brisk and plantars were flexor. Meningeal signs were absent. Her systemic examination was unremarkable. An electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia. Atropine was given intravenously and normal saline infusion started. Blood pressure remained low which prompted initiation of norepinephrine drip. Capillary blood glucose (CBG) was 35 mg/dL, hence 50 mL of 50% dextrose bolus was given and 5% dextrose infusion started. Her neurological status started deteriorating and she rapidly lapsed into coma, 90 minutes from her initial presentation. At this stage, pupils were bilateral 2 mm and nonreactive, with loss of occulocephalic reflex and dysconjugate deviation of eye. She continued to have bradycardia and hypotension. Repeat CBG was 32 mg/dL and bolus of 50 mL 50% dextrose was repeated. No history could be gathered regarding the preceding events. At this stage, in addition to malaria, encephalitis, cerebrovascular accident, exogenous insulin administration was considered as another staff detected one empty vial of insulin. Blood samples were drawn for glucose, insulin, and c-peptide. Patient had an episode of generalized tonic clonic seizure which was treated with intravenous lorazepam 4 mg. Again a bolus of 50 mL Continue reading >>

Can Insulin Resistance Kill You?

Can Insulin Resistance Kill You?

This is a fair question, because insulin resistance is a precursor to type 2 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes is a leading killer of people in the U.S. Insulin resistance raises the risk of stroke, heart disease, kidney disease and other potentially lethal conditions. Nevertheless, can insulin resistance, of which 60 million Americans have (many not even knowing it), outright kill a person? “Nobody will ever die as a direct result of having insulin resistance,” says Dr. David Edelson, MD, board certified in internal and bariatric medicine, one of the top obesity experts in the U.S., and founder and medical director for thin-site.com and HealthBridge. I interviewed him for this article. “However, think of it like a stick of dynamite with a very long fuse,” he continues. “Treat it properly with good lifestyle habits and the fuse will never be lit. Adopt poor lifestyles like a diet high in starches, sugars and bad fats, lack of exercise and poor sleep patterns, and you light the fuse.” Let’s talk about good lifestyle habits. Often, people think they have healthy lifestyle habits, when in fact, they don’t. I’m a certified personal trainer and have known many people who believe they get adequate exercise, when in actuality, just the opposite is true. Vacuuming and hoisting out the garbage on Sunday evening shouldn’t count as your exercise for Sunday, especially since these tasks involve non-neutral spinal alignment — a bad thing. You still owe yourself at least 20 minutes of vigorous exercise — in a systematic, methodical way, such as a combination of jumping rope, stair stepping (even one step will suffice if all you have is one step in the house), lunges, squats and jogging in place with high knees. Bad fats are found in commercially-prepared pastries Continue reading >>

Nurse 'injected Her Non-diabetic Mother With A Potentially Lethal Dose Of Insulin'

Nurse 'injected Her Non-diabetic Mother With A Potentially Lethal Dose Of Insulin'

Nurse Julia Knight (pictured) is accused of attempting to murder her mother by giving her a lethal injection of insulin A nurse injected her non-diabetic mother with a potentially lethal dose of insulin in her hospital bed because she didn't want her to be discharged from hospital, a court heard today. Julia Knight wept on the stand as she said she wanted to make her 81-year-old mother a 'bit poorly' so medical staff would see that she was too ill to go home. Elderly Irene Robson had been admitted to hospital after suffering a fall at her home but later fell unconscious and was left foaming at the mouth after her blood sugar levels plummeted to fatal levels. After doctors saved her life, they discovered that she had been injected with insulin, usually used to treat type 1 diabetes, which had caused the hypoglycaemic attack. Knight, aged 56 years, admits forging a prescription for the insulin and injecting her mother at her bedside at the Horton General Hospital in Banbury, Oxfordshire, on October 7, 2014. However she denies trying to murder her mother and told jurors she only wanted to make Ms Robson have a 'blip' so that she would not be discharged prematurely. Her mother had been in and out of hospital after her health deteriorated following treatment for leukaemia, and later a brain haemorrhage and a series of falls, the court heard. With a trembling voice, Knight told jurors: 'I had been concerned about mum coming home, I needed to do something that would make them sit up and see that she wasn't well. 'They were going to send her home again with no care package, with no thought to her health failing. 'I wanted her to be a little bit poorly, just to have a bit of a blip, so they would sit up and take notice and think "we cannot send this lady home so soon".' After c Continue reading >>

Charlie Dunne Died Of Insulin Overdose After Injecting Herself With Diabetic Boyfriend's Pen

Charlie Dunne Died Of Insulin Overdose After Injecting Herself With Diabetic Boyfriend's Pen

A teenage girl who died after injecting herself with insulin may have taken it to try to lose weight. Charlie Dunne, 19, used an insulin pen belonging to her diabetic boyfriend while he was out at a hospital appointment. An inquest heard the trainee hairdresser may have taken the hormone previously after hearing that it could help slimmers. Miss Dunne with boyfriend Terence Rhoden. He found the teenager unconscious on the living room floor of their home after he returned from hospital and realised she had taken his insulin But the teenager, who was fit and healthy, would have been unaware of the catastrophic danger the drug posed to non-diabetics, a coroner said. Miss Dunne was discovered collapsed at the home in Atherton, Greater Manchester, she shared with boyfriend Terence Rhoden, 28, when he returned hours later. Loss: Charlie Dunne, 19, injected herself with an insulin pen belonging to diabetic boyfriend Terence Rhoden. She died in hospital a few days later She suffered brain damage caused by a dramatic drop in blood sugar and died in hospital six days later. Police later investigated claims by Miss Dunnes family that Mr Rhoden had confessed to injecting her with insulin in the past to help her lose weight. But he denied doing so and officers found no evidence that he was involved in his girlfriends death. Bolton Coroners Court was told that bubbly Miss Dunne was a regular at her local Methodist church, where she was given the community title of rose queen for her charity fundraising. However, the inquest was told she suffered mood swings and had tried to overdose on tablets during a previous relationship. She also claimed to have suffered a miscarriage and was worried she could not have children, despite a lack of medical evidence to support her fears. The court Continue reading >>

Kenneth Barlow: The First Documented Case Of Murder By Insulin

Kenneth Barlow: The First Documented Case Of Murder By Insulin

On the morning of 4 May 1957, just after 2 am, Dr David Price, a forensic pathologist, was called to the home of Elizabeth and Kenneth Barlow in a residential suburb of Bradford, Yorkshire. The story was that Kenneth Barlow had discovered his wife unconscious in the bath at about 11.20 pm the previous night and called his own doctor, who diagnosed her as dead. Kenneth, a 38-year-old state registered nurse, was unemployed. He had married Elizabeth 11 months earlier and was, to all outward appearances, living happily with her and his 10-year-old son by his first wife. According to Kenneth, Elizabeth had had tea at about 5 pm on the day of her death. Shortly afterwards she announced that she was tired, and went to bed. When Kenneth came to bed at about 9.30 pm he found that Elizabeth had vomited on the bed. Together they changed the sheets. She put on some pyjamas but took them off because she said she felt too warm and decided to take a bath. Kenneth lay on the bed and went to sleep at about 9.45 pm to the sound of the bath running. When he woke up at around 11.20 pm Elizabeth had not returned to bed. When he went into the bathroom he found her submerged beneath the water. He tried to lift her out but did not have the strength to do so. Nevertheless, he held her head above the water until all the water had run out of the tub. He said he then tried artificial respiration by ‘pressing on her abdomen’ as he was unable to lift her from the bath. Only after this was unsuccessful did he run next door to his neighbours, who had a telephone, and ask them to call a doctor. The family doctor arrived 10 minutes later and found Elizabeth in the empty bath in a position simulating natural sleep. He did not touch her beyond ascertaining that she was dead. With such an unexpected de Continue reading >>

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

A fellow caregiver asked... How serious is type 2 diabetes, and is it less or more serious than type 1 diabetes? My mom, just diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, keeps it under control without taking insulin. So is type 2 diabetes less of a problem than insulin-dependent type 1? Expert Answers No, definitely not. In fact, in some ways type 2 diabetes is a more serious disorder because your mom may have had it for years before she was diagnosed. So she may well have developed some of the long-term, debilitating complications linked to the condition without knowing it. In addition, since type 2 diabetes is a progressive disorder without a cure, over time her body may not be able to produce insulin or use it as well as it does now, and she may wind up needing insulin injections or pills. A person with type1 diabetes ignores it for a day at his own peril. He'll likely end up in the emergency room because his body can't absorb glucose without a continuous supply of insulin via injection or an insulin pump. People with type 1 diabetes typically develop such severe symptoms over a short time in childhood or early adulthood that they're forced to deal with it. Type 2 diabetes is a sneakier condition: Its harmful health effects can slowly build for years until full-blown complications, such as vision loss, heart disease, or foot problems, make it impossible to ignore. Plus it often comes with its own set of problems. For instance, people with type 2 diabetes are frequently diagnosed with high blood pressure and cholesterol along with high blood sugar. This damaging threesome can lead to progressive thickening of the arteries and reduced blood flow, putting your mom at greater risk for a slew of complications including heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage. If your mom is overweigh Continue reading >>

Insulin Overdose | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Insulin Overdose | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community recently saw a program (fictional) where a man was attempting sucicide by overdosing on 3 ampules of insulin. Just curious as to whether this has any basis in reality. If it does is this programme irrisponsible as it may give viewers ideas they might not otherwise have had. It is certainly a possibility! Especially if they do not happen to be a diabetic.There have been one or two cases of murder where insulin has been used and as it is a natural body substance,very difficult to detect.However it is not the sort of thing you can just buy over the counter from the chemist. You need quite a lot of insulin to overcome the liver's sugar dump and glucagon reactions in a non-diabetic, but then you can kill with an injection of air to the bloodstream, that's why you have to clear bubbles from syringes and pens. Thereare loads of things that can kill. Like in the Omen when the nanny killed Damiens mum, injecting air into her arm. There was the story line in Corrie a couple of years ago when the diabetic girl smashed all here insulin and ate tons of sugar and slipped into a coma and died, This is completely true, 4 years ago i tried ending my life by overdosing on insulin, i am a type 1 diabetic, and ended up putting myself in a coma. if it wasnt for the fast action of my mum and the hospital stuff, i wouldnt be here today. it was a bad chapter in my life, and thankfully its over now, but the dangers of overdosing on insulin, whether intentional or not, if a very real thing. sorry if i dampen anyones mood! an insulin overdose can not only kill it could also leave some one brain damaged Psychiatrists used to induce diabetic comas in schizophrenic patients using Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates Are Not Killing You: Part 1

Carbohydrates Are Not Killing You: Part 1

By now I’m sure you’ve heard that carbs are killing you. Carbs are the enemy. Carbs make you fat. Carbs prevent fat burning. Carbs are pure sugar. Carbs will make you a diabetic. Carbs are dietary napalm. Is any of this true? How did carbs get such a bad name? In this post, I’ll share with you both the validity and flaws of this argument, so that you can make up your mind for yourself. In order to understand the situation completely, we’ll have to learn some basic human physiology. Strap on your science helmet. Here goes. In today’s dietspeak, carbohydrates are the nutritional equivalent of Enron circa 2001. Bad. Really bad. Unethically bad. Carb-restricted diets like the Atkins diet, the South Beach diet, the Zone diet, and the Paleo diet have become commonplace, resulting in a plethora of meal options high in both fat and protein. These diets became popular because they result in weight loss in the short term, allowing dieters to shed pounds in an effort to regain health. Ten years ago fat was the enemy. Now fat is in vogue. What happened? Take a careful look at this popular (and very well designed) infographic. In it, the creators Massive Health show you a 12-step process by which carbohydrates make you fat. Let it be known that I have nothing against Massive Health as an organization, merely the logic that they present regarding the deleterious effect of carbohydrate feeding. In order to fully understand this article, let’s take a 2 minute crash course on carbohydrate metabolism in the human body. A Crash Course in Carbohydrate Metabolism There are only three macronutrients that your body derives energy from. They are (1) carbohydrates, (2) fat, and (3) protein. Vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants, and water do not provide energy, they are necessary Continue reading >>

Do Carbs Cause Diabetes And Kill You?

Do Carbs Cause Diabetes And Kill You?

It just keeps coming. Even though science has never vilified a macro-nutrient as the direct cause of diabetes, some less than ethical individuals continue new approaches to get the public to move away from carbs, and toward fat. Why? you ask? Money. If you’re turned off by conspiracy talk, well … after reading this article, you won’t be able to come to a better conclusion than – money. They do call it “The Bottom Line”. We see empirical data that Low-fat diets don’t lead to diabetes, and studies show Low-fat diet’s seeming to reverse diabetes while consumption of carbs are high. But don’t low-CARB diets do the same? How can that be? Well of course if you remove carbs, blood sugar won’t be high. And these Low-carb guru’s hope you don’t learn any more than that. But humans are supposed to have blood sugar, and insulin is there to keep it at a certain level. They’re ignoring Nature We’re supposed to eat carbs. They’re in every natural food on Earth. Even the Inventor of the Glycemic index recommends veganism. Obesity, diabetes, etc, is mostly caused by putting carbs WITH fat in a diet, which nature doesn’t do with any food. Refined carbs are worse. The reason carbs and fat are both maligned AND defended is they’re bad TOGETHER! People with candida and diabetes who started a high-fruit low-fat diet, CURED it. The key is low-fat (according to experts like Neal Barnard, M.D. , and Dr Graham) The reason diabetes happens: Too much fat in the blood blocks insulin receptors from taking glucose out of the blood – leading to prolonged high levels of blood glucose, which prolongs insulin production. Because glucose can’t leave the bloodstream, the pancreas continues to create redundant insulin. Nature shouldn’t be maligned just because humans Continue reading >>

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