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How Can I Lose Weight On Insulin?

High Insulin May Be Preventing You From Losing Weight

High Insulin May Be Preventing You From Losing Weight

Today I’d like to share with you a case study from my clinic that describes how high blood insulin levels can make a person gain weight and keep them overweight. Evelyn was a 44 year old lady who came to see me for help with losing weight. Her weight had been a problem for most of her life but she could always lose a few kilos in the past if she went on a diet and did some exercise. The problem now is that none of her old tricks were working. She would cut the fat out of her diet and drastically reduce her portion sizes but wasn’t able to lose more than 6 or 7 pounds. She would stay on this strict diet for more than 3 months but couldn’t lose any more weight. The frustration, fatigue and hunger made her give up on the diet and she went back to her old ways of eating and she regained the weight. The thing is, Evelyn’s diet wasn’t too bad; she rarely ate any junk food and she knew about the importance of eating lots of vegetables. Interesting, she had been diagnosed with a fatty liver 5 years ago but her doctor never offered any solutions and just told her not to worry about it. I explained to Evelyn that her fatty liver had everything to do with her weight and that it was vitally important to clear the fat from within it. I ordered a few blood tests for Evelyn and the most striking result was her blood insulin level; it was 4 times higher than it should be and this was preventing her from losing weight. Evelyn was able to lose 54 pounds in 5 and a half months by following my recommendations. High blood insulin levels and fatty liver go hand in hand. In fact it is the high insulin that drives the liver to manufacture fat. Most people do not develop a fatty liver because they ate too much fat; they got a fatty liver because they ate too much carbohydrate, which t Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight With Insulin Resistance

How To Lose Weight With Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is a condition that keeps the body from using the insulin that it does produce in a proper manner. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that helps the body use glucose for energy. In the form of sugar, glucose is the main source of energy for the body. And because it increases the chance of developing Type 2 diabetes, it is important to lose weight if you do have this condition in order to avoid diabetes and better control your condition. Video of the Day Eat frequent, small meals. By eating every 3-5 hours, you keep your blood sugar levels more constant. Long periods without eating encourages your body to store fat because your metabolism slows down and your body enters a starvation state. Eat at least 5 times per day. Keep you carbohydrate to protein ratio at 2:1, which works out to be one serving of carbohydrates for every small serving of protein. For every 1 gram of protein you have, you may have 2 grams of carbohydrates. This keeps the body from storing excess carbohydrates in the form of fat. Eat lean sources of protein. Lean sources of protein can be lean meat, fish or poultry, legumes (such as dried beans and lentils), dairy foods (low-fat or fat-free), or nuts and seeds. With the exception of nuts and seeds, eat as much of the other sources of lean protein you need to satisfy your hunger. Eat at least three servings of vegetables per day. Eat as many servings of vegetables as you like except for corn and potatoes because they are high-carbohydrate foods. Limit high-carbohydrate foods to just the amount your body needs because these foods cause the greatest increase in blood glucose and insulin. Extra carbohydrates your body does not need will be stored as fat. Other than sugary foods, one serving is about 1/2 cup, which provides about 1 Continue reading >>

21 Warning Signs You Have An Insulin Resistance That’s Preventing You From Losing Weight

21 Warning Signs You Have An Insulin Resistance That’s Preventing You From Losing Weight

This post was written by Nick Garcia, HN. He believes that everyone can achieve a healthy lifestyle and the body of their dreams. That’s why he is dedicated to helping people eat real food, exercise smart, and transform their habits using simple strategies anyone can do. Follow him on Facebook or subscribe to his Youtube channel. Insulin resistance could be the reason you are having trouble losing weight. If you have a love/hate relationship with carbs, read this article to find out if you have or are at risk for insulin resistance. Do you have insulin resistance? It’s hard to simply answer yes or no, even with a proper diagnosis. Diagnosing Insulin Resistance Before providing you the insulin resistance self-test, there are a few ways your Dr. can provide diagnosis insulin resistance. These tests aren’t always conclusive and many times provide false-positives and/or false negatives. Let’s take a look at 4 tests you could have your Dr. prescribe: 1. Waist Circumference A relatively simple test that determines if you have a waist measurement greater than 35 inches. 2. Fasting Glucose Levels One of the most common tests done that measures glucose levels after you’ve fasted for a few hours. If your blood sugar is higher than normal (75-100 mg/dl) you could have insulin resistance. 3. Fasting Insulin Levels In this test, levels of insulin are measured in the blood after fasting, instead of glucose. A fasting insulin level higher than 10 uIU/ml is an indicator for insulin resistance. 4. Glucose Tolerance Tests A complicated test that requires many blood tests throughout the day. This test is done if diabetes or hypoglycemia is suspected. Make sure your insulin levels are also tested if your Dr. suggests this particular test. The problem with most tests, is they don Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Many overweight adults can't seem to lose weight no matter what they try. The problem may not lie in their calorie counts but their very cells: Increasing numbers of Americans, leading nutritionists say, are insulin-resistant. That is, their bodies no longer properly use the hormone insulin to process the food that's eaten. Net result: The body hangs on tight to the fat that's already there. A stubborn inability to lose weight because of insulin resistance is a complicated but common problem, says integrative nutritionist Beth Reardon, director of nutrition for Duke Integrative Medicine, part of the Duke University Health System. If you're fighting the scale, she adds, you may be among the 79 million American adults who have or are heading toward prediabetes, a syndrome of insulin-related challenges that usually leads to diabetes unless health changes are made. In 2010, 1.9 million new cases of full-blown diabetes were diagnosed, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Indeed, diabetes and obesity are so related that some health experts have coined the descriptor diabesity. Why You May Not Be Losing Weight When we eat, the food is broken down into glucose (blood sugar), the body's main energy source. As blood flows through the pancreas, this organ detects the high levels of glucose and knows to release insulin, a hormone that it produces in order to allow the cells throughout the body to use the glucose. The cells have insulin receptors that allow glucose to enter. Then the cell either uses the glucose to make energy right away or stores it as a future energy source. For some people, though, this system has gone haywire. The cells' insulin receptors have pretty much stopped acknowledging the insulin, which means the cells don't get the glucose. Instead, the glucos Continue reading >>

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin and weight gain often go hand in hand, but weight control is possible. If you need insulin therapy, here's how to minimize — or avoid — weight gain. Weight gain is a common side effect for people who take insulin — a hormone that regulates the absorption of sugar (glucose) by cells. This can be frustrating because maintaining a healthy weight is an important part of your overall diabetes management plan. The good news is that it is possible to maintain your weight while taking insulin. The link between insulin and weight gain When you take insulin, glucose is able to enter your cells, and glucose levels in your blood drop. This is the desired treatment goal. But if you take in more calories than you need to maintain a healthy weight — given your level of activity — your cells will get more glucose than they need. Glucose that your cells don't use accumulates as fat. Avoid weight gain while taking insulin Eating healthy foods and being physically active most days of the week can help you prevent unwanted weight gain. The following tips can help you keep the pounds off: Count calories. Eating and drinking fewer calories helps you prevent weight gain. Stock the refrigerator and pantry with fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Plan for every meal to have the right mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins, and fats. Generally, experts recommend that meals consist of half non starchy vegetable, one-quarter protein and one quarter a starch such as rice or a starchy vegetable such as corn or peas. Trim your portion sizes, skip second helpings and drink water instead of high-calorie drinks. Talk to your doctor, nurse or a dietitian about meal-planning strategies and resources. Don't skip meals. Don't try to cut calories by skipping meals. When you skip Continue reading >>

Insulin And Fat Storage

Insulin And Fat Storage

We left off last week with the question, “What prevents fat from leaving the fat cell?” If you missed out on it, you may want to read The Futility of Low-Calorie Diets. To quickly recap, we talked about the fact that your body has two main fuels: glucose (sugar) or fat. The preferred source of fuel is fat, but under certain circumstances, we can shift the body to using more sugar rather than fat. At times, such as being chased by a rabid dog, this is a good thing. However, it’s not a good thing if sugar remains the main fuel for most of the day. Relying on sugar means you’re not burning fat. Many people make lifestyle choices and nutrition decisions that have basically locked up their extra stored fat in their fat cells, making it useless for energy. The only way you can lose fat is if you use fat. You’ll be unsuccessful at losing fat if you don’t burn fat, even if you eat fewer calories and burn more through exercise. You can lose weight, but most of the loss will come from lean body mass, or muscle tissue, not fat. Fat Storage and Insulin The most significant factor in fat storage is the level of insulin in the blood. Insulin has many effects on the body. With respect to fat storage, insulin increases the storage of fat in fat cells and prevents fat cells from releasing fat for energy. This is such a key point for people to understand that I’ll repeat it: Insulin increases the storage of fat in fat cells and prevents the cells from releasing it for energy. Eight hormones stimulate fat utilization: epinephrine, norepinephrine, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), glucagon, thyroid-stimulating hormone, melanocyte-stimulating hormone, vasopressin and growth hormone. One hormone prevents fat utilization: insulin. The pancreas releases insulin when blood suga Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Manage Your Weight While Taking Insulin

5 Ways To Manage Your Weight While Taking Insulin

Thinkstock For some people on insulin therapy for type 2 diabetes, weight gain is an unwanted side effect. But don’t be tempted to skip insulin doses to keep off the pounds. Poorly controlled diabetes increases your risk for serious complications, including heart disease and stroke, says Don McClain, MD, PhD, professor of endocrinology and metabolism and director of the Center on Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Instead, you can avoid weight gain from insulin and keep your blood sugar levels in check by following a few important steps. The Link Between Insulin and Weight Gain In order to prevent weight gain when you start taking insulin, it’s important to understand why it happens. “Several different factors come into play,” Dr. McClain explains. People may begin taking insulin because their diabetes is not well controlled. He points out this actually could have led to weight loss prior to starting insulin therapy for a few different reasons: When you’re not managing diabetes well, your body can’t use glucose from food for energy. Excess glucose in the blood spills out through the urine, wasting calories. This allows people to eat more, but still lose weight. As sugar is lost in the urine, people also become dehydrated. Those who have lost water weight may think they’ve lost fat. Some people actually lose muscle mass (and not fat), as insulin is critical for building muscle. Once insulin therapy begins, all three of these factors may start to turn around at once. People are rehydrated, they add muscle, and they store calories once spilled out in the urine, McClain explains. “This can cause people to generally bounce back to the weight they were before the poor control started,” Mc Continue reading >>

Losing Weight On Medication

Losing Weight On Medication

Tweet Whilst weight gain on diabetes medication is not a foregone conclusion, it is a relatively common problem that can occur. With commitment, and the support of your doctor, it is possible to prevent weight gain and to start losing weight. Reasons for gaining weight Before looking at what can be done to prevent weight gain, it’s important to understand in what ways medication can lead to weight gain. Generally, the most common reason is that stronger diabetes medication can cause low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). In turn, this can cause an individual to eat more than they might otherwise need to in order to prevent or treat low blood glucose levels. Stronger diabetes medication can therefore lead to weight gain for the following reasons: Needing to ‘feed’ the insulin to prevent low blood sugar levels Response to strong hunger as a result of hypos Decreased willingness to exercise to avoid risk of hypos Stop feeding the insulin Diabetes drugs such as insulin, sulphonylureas and prandial glucose regulators all increase the amount of insulin in your body. Whilst these drugs are usually prescribed to people who have blood glucose levels that have been above the target values, they can still sometimes lead to lower-than-normal blood sugars. If you find that you have to eat more often than you would like, or have larger quantities of starchy foods, in order to prevent lows occurring, you may be at risk of putting on weight as a result. If you eating more to prevent lows, you may need to speak to your doctor about whether your medication dose can be reduced. Note that if your dose is reduced, you will need to maintain a healthy and relatively low calorie diet and may need to take additional physical activity to ensure your blood glucose results do not rise too hi Continue reading >>

Insulin Causes Weight Gain – Hormonal Obesity Iv

Insulin Causes Weight Gain – Hormonal Obesity Iv

In our previous post, we were reviewing the link between insulin and obesity. It appears that insulin is not merely associated with obesity but causes obesity. Click here for Hormonal Obesity Part I, Part II, and Part III. For decades we believed the Caloric Reduction as Primary (CRaP) hypothesis of obesity that turned out to be as useful as a half-built bridge. Study after study showed that reducing calories did NOT lead to weight loss. Patient after patient tried to lose weight by restricting calories with consistent failure. But we couldn’t abandon the calorie model so what was left to do? Blame the patient, of course! Since patients were not losing weight, there was only 2 possibilities. Either the advice to eat a low fat, calorie restricted diet and exercise more was wrong or the patient was not following this advice. So the doctors and dieticians berated, ridiculed, belittled, rebuked, chided and reprimanded. We said – Eat less, Move more – as if that would cure their problems. After all, the food pyramid couldn’t be wrong, could it? But the excess weight was still as persistent as a nagging tooth. Doctors, of course, were drawn to this CRaP hypothesis as bathers to a seashore. Obesity was now not our failure to understand it, but their lack of willpower and/or laziness (gluttony or sloth). It was our favourite game – blame the patient. But, of course, the problem was the CRaP hypothesis. It was just wrong. Increased calories did not cause obesity so reducing calories didn’t cause weight loss. Exercise didn’t work either, as we will see in a future series. So, what was the real aetiology of obesity? Insulin. What happens when we give high doses of insulin to patients? Insulin makes you gain weight. The more insulin you take, the more weight you gain. Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Difficult For Women With Insulin Resistance

Weight Loss Difficult For Women With Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is not a very common topic of discussion when it comes to women and their weight loss. In fact, most women have never heard of the term and don’t even realize that insulin resistance is probably one of the biggest causes of their weight loss frustration. As one of the top physicians in the field of bariatrics—the study of medical weight management—Dr. Caroline Cederquist knows just how significant of a hurdle insulin resistance in women can be. Many women who suffer from insulin resistance don’t even know they have it until they are tested for it. “Ninety percent of the people in my medical practice are insulin resistant. In this case, the body makes the hormone insulin, but it doesn’t work properly within cells,” says Dr. Caroline Cederquist. “The insulin receptors on these cells don’t open up properly. This prevents glucose from turning into stored energy, and as result, our cells become starved.” People who suffer from insulin resistance have a hard time losing weight because their cells are constantly producing more insulin, but their cells aren’t turning that insulin into needed nutrients and energy. This over-production of insulin can make it difficult to lose weight, and can lead to health problems, like diabetes. For many women, genes can play a factor when it comes to insulin resistance. In many cases, insulin resistance develops due to genetic influences, increased weight gain, or both. If your parents were insulin resistant, the more likely you are to get insulin resistance at a younger age, especially if they suffered from health conditions, like diabetes. Dr. Cederquist explains what insulin resistance is, and why the condition makes it so difficult for women to lose weight: As a woman, one of the best things you can Continue reading >>

Insulin (2)

Insulin (2)

Weight Loss: Insulin (2) Video class with Jon Gabriel Join Jon Gabriel as he talks about: Insulin, blood sugar and Type-2 diabetes What happens when your body becomes insulin resistant How to balance your blood sugar levels OR Read The Lecture Transcripts Here So that eventually if your body pumps out enough insulin your cells will listen to it and your sugar levels will go back down. So when your fat programs are on and you get this condition called insulin resistance and the cells in your body stop listening to insulin, it takes much more insulin to get the job done. So your insulin levels go up; you become what’s called hyperinsulinemia, you have what’s called hyperinsulinemia. Hyper means high, insulin is insulin, emia is a condition, so it’s a condition in which your insulin levels are too high, and they have to be too high to manage your blood sugar. But, insulin is also the fat storage hormone. So when there’s insulin in your bloodstream your body goes into a kind of fat storage mode where it activates all the different enzymes in your body that make fat, and so your body goes into fat making mode. The sugar goes into the fat cells, your body starts making fat. Now when you have hyperinsulinemia then your insulin levels are too high, your body is always in this fat storage mode when your insulin levels are too high, when you have this hyperinsulinemia. As long as your insulin levels are high, you lose the ability to burn fat, and the reason you lose the ability to burn fat is because insulin stops your body from producing the hormones that burn fat, like glucagon and the enzymes that burn fat. When your insulin levels are high, if you think about it your body is going to say if we’re in fat storage mode we don’t want to burn fat; it doesn’t make any Continue reading >>

Losing Weight While Taking Insulin

Losing Weight While Taking Insulin

When my friend and #SocialDiet compatriot Scott Mowbray wrote about solving for X to lose weight, he’s talking about the math required to take off pounds. Simple algebra: Calories consumed minus calories burned = X, where X is the caloric difference. If it’s a negative, you lose weight. This formula is actually what most weight-loss advice is based on. Sure, you need support, the right environment, inspiration and dedication. But to really remove the pounds, you gotta burn more than you eat. If solving for X is simple algebra for a normal overweight person, solving for X is quantum physics for someone on an insulin pump. And I’m learning quantum physics on the fly. I have had diabetes for nearly 15 years. I have a version of the disease often called type 1.5 (latent autoimmune diabetes of adults). It started out as classic type 2 diabetes—even though I was athletic and of normal weight. Over the years I’ve progressed to the point where I take insulin for every meal. (I will always take insulin—this is not a disease you can put into remission. But my old pancreas is probably still pumping a little insulin out. Losing weight and eating healthier could reduce the amount of insulin I’m taking.) Last year I got an insulin pump, which allows me to inject doses when I eat. The pump also injects insulin at a particular rate over the course of the day. It has taken me nearly a year to get the pump and my body in sync. Our bodies, unfortunately, are not computers. They react to stress, to hormonal and emotional changes, to illness—even to seasonal changes. And that can throw off the carefully calibrated insulin doses doled out by my pump. Habitual behavior—eating the same foods and exercising the same way at the same times—makes managing diabetes (types 1 or 2 Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Diet Guide For Beginners + Advanced Weight Loss Tips

Insulin Resistance Diet Guide For Beginners + Advanced Weight Loss Tips

Is insulin resistance, diabetes or pre diabetes making it difficult or impossible for you to lose weight? If you fall into this category you probably understand that for the most part insulin resistance is a DIETARY disease. Meaning you most likely have this condition because of the food you've eaten (or are currently eating). Understanding this concept is very important because if you understand that insulin resistance can be caused (and worsened) by diet it is also true that diet can actually help to lower insulin levels and reverse insulin resistance. But hold on. I have some good news for you and some bad news... First the bad news: Most Doctors and patients approach insulin resistance all wrong which leads to higher insulin levels and more weight gain over time. But, here's the good news: I'm going to walk you through how to approach insulin resistance through diet, medications and supplements. Because the best way to treat and reverse insulin resistance is with a comprehensive approach: Let's talk about what foods to eat, what foods to avoid, how much food you should be eating, what type of macromolecules you should consume on a daily basis and much more...​ Understanding Insulin Resistance Before we talk about diet and interventions for insulin resistance you really need to have a basic understand of what insulin resistance is and WHY you would even want to treat it. This is the beginners guide to understanding insulin resistance, diabetes and pre diabetes: Insulin is a hormone that is secreted from your pancreas in response to two macromolecules: glucose (sugar) and protein. It's primary job is to move that sugar inside your cells so your body can burn them for energy. It can put this glucose (energy) into all cells including your fat cells. Why? Because your Continue reading >>

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

For folks with diabetes, weight loss is a natural form of “medication.” Reams of research prove that losing even just a few pounds is an effective way to control blood sugar or reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first place. But in an ironic twist, losing weight may be more difficult if you have type 2 diabetes. And the reason isn’t just a lack of willpower. Too often, diet plans don’t work for people with diabetes because the metabolism changes associated with blood sugar problems may increase appetite, slow down fat burning, and encourage fat storage. Now breakthrough research has revealed a better way for people to lose weight and reduce insulin resistance. The secret is a concept called intermittent fasting. British researchers created this revolutionary new diet, which strictly limits caloric intake for two days of the week but permits larger portions for the remainder. Women who followed the plan lost almost twice as much fat as those who restricted calories every day. Within three months, participants reduced insulin resistance by 25 percent more on nonfast days and inflammation by 8 percent more than people who dieted continuously. Why Does this Particular Diabetes Diet Plan Work? It counteracts the effects of “diabesity,” where blood sugar problems and excess body fat meet. Just a small amount of excess weight and a genetic tendency for metabolism problems can trigger a cascade of health issues, including high cholesterol, high blood pressure, immune system problems, and hormonal imbalances. This constellation of health problems is caused by a modern lifestyle that is out of sync with our genetic inheritance. Researchers theorize that because humans evolved during alternating periods of feast and famine, many of us inherited variou Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

I recently was included in a discussion on a Facebook group for athletes with diabetes about how hard it can be to lose weight through exercise. While I would never claim to have all the answers on this topic, here are some ideas about what can make you gain weight or keep you from losing weight with diabetes, based on my decades of professional and personal experience with diabetes and weight management, and what you can do about it. Insulin My former graduate student with type 1 diabetes went on an insulin pump and promptly gained about 10 pounds, even though his blood glucose control improved only marginally. Why did this happen to him (and why does it happen to so many other insulin users)? As a naturally occurring anabolic hormone, insulin promotes the uptake and storage of glucose, amino acids, and fat into insulin-sensitive cells around your body (mainly muscle and fat cells). It doesn’t matter whether it’s released naturally, injected, or pumped—all insulin and insulin analogues have these same effects. Going on intensive insulin therapy is associated with fat weight gain (1), for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Some of the weight gain comes from that if you’re using insulin to keep your blood glucose in control, you’ll be keeping and storing all of the calories that you’re eating instead of losing some glucose through urine (during hyperglycemia). Unfortunately, this realization has led some people to try skipping or limiting their insulin use to help them lose weight (2), but that is a dangerous practice that can lead to loss of excess muscle mass and life-threatening conditions like DKA. The best way to balance your insulin use and your body weight, in my opinion, is to be physically active to keep your overall insulin levels lower. I Continue reading >>

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