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Ketone Testing: What You Need To Know

Ketone Testing: What You Need To Know

What are ketones? Ketones are produced when the body burns fat for energy or fuel. They are also produced when you lose weight or if there is not enough insulin to help your body use sugar for energy. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the blood. Since the body is unable to use glucose for energy, it breaks down fat instead. When this occurs, ketones form in the blood and spill into the urine. These ketones can make you very sick. How can I test for ketones? You can test to see if your body is making any ketones by doing a simple urine test. There are several products available for ketone testing and they can be purchased, without a prescription, at your pharmacy. The test result can be negative, or show small, moderate, or large quantities of ketones. When should I test for ketones? Anytime your blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl for two tests in a row. When you are ill. Often illness, infections, or injuries will cause sudden high blood glucose and this is an especially important time to check for ketones. When you are planning to exercise and the blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl. If you are pregnant, you should test for ketones each morning before breakfast and any time the blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl. If ketones are positive, what does this mean? There are situations when you might have ketones without the blood glucose being too high. Positive ketones are not a problem when blood glucose levels are within range and you are trying to lose weight. It is a problem if blood glucose levels are high and left untreated. Untreated high blood glucose with positive ketones can lead to a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). What should I do if the ketone test is positive? Call your diabetes educator or physician, as you may need additional Continue reading >>

Glucose In Urine Test

Glucose In Urine Test

What is a Glucose in Urine Test? A glucose in urine test measures the amount of glucose in your urine. Glucose is a type of sugar. It is your body's main source of energy. A hormone called insulin helps move glucose from your bloodstream into your cells. If too much glucose gets into the blood, the extra glucose will be eliminated through your urine. A urine glucose test can be used to help determine if blood glucose levels are too high, which may be a sign of diabetes. Other names: urine sugar test; urine glucose test; glucosuria test What is it used for? A glucose in urine test may be part of a urinalysis, a test that measures different cells, chemicals, and other substances in your urine. Urinalysis is often included as part of a routine exam. A glucose in urine test may also be used to screen for diabetes. However, a urine glucose test is not as accurate as a blood glucose test. It may be ordered if blood glucose testing is difficult or not possible. Some people can't get blood drawn because their veins are too small or too scarred from repeated punctures. Other people avoid blood tests due to extreme anxiety or fear of needles. Why do I need a glucose in urine test? You may get a glucose in urine test as part of your regular checkup or if you have symptoms of diabetes and cannot take a blood glucose test. Symptoms of diabetes include: You may also need a urinalysis, which includes a glucose in urine test, if you are pregnant. If high levels of glucose in urine are found, it may indicate gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is form of diabetes that happens only during pregnancy. Blood glucose testing can be used to confirm a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Most pregnant women are tested for gestational diabetes with a blood glucose test, between their 24th Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Lab Test Results

Understanding Your Lab Test Results

Diabetes is a chronic condition that requires an enormous amount of self-care and that can affect many parts of the body. Because of this, people who have diabetes are generally advised to visit their doctors multiple times a year and also to see various specialists (such as endocrinologists, podiatrists, and eye doctors) periodically to screen for potential problems and treat any complications that arise. Along with blood pressure readings and inspection of the feet and eyes, there are a number of laboratory tests recommended by the American Diabetes Association. These tests are used to track blood glucose control, kidney function, cardiovascular health, and other areas of health. Although you certainly can’t and won’t be expected to analyze the lab report when your test results come back, knowing a little bit about what your report says can be a way for you to more fully understand and take charge of your health. If it isn’t already your doctor’s regular practice to give you copies of your lab reports, ask for a copy the next time you have lab tests done. Use the information in this article to learn more about what lab reports show, and discuss your results with your doctor to learn what your results mean with regards to your health. Lab reports All lab reports share certain standard features, regardless of the test(s) they show. A Federal law, the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act, regulates all aspects of clinical laboratory testing. It states exactly what information must be included in your lab test report. Some of the standard features include the following: • Your name and a unique identification number, which may be either your birth date or a medical record number assigned to you by the lab. • The name and address of the lab that tested your bloo Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Measuring Sugar Levels In Blood And Urine Yourself

Type 1 Diabetes: Measuring Sugar Levels In Blood And Urine Yourself

Many people with diabetes measure their blood sugar levels on their own. For those who inject insulin several times a day, checking their sugar levels with a blood glucose meter is an important part of their daily treatment. The amount of insulin that is injected at mealtimes depends on various factors, including the measured blood sugar level. Sugar levels in blood or urine can be measured in various ways. Sugar levels can also be measured in body tissue. Measuring blood sugar levels yourself You can measure your blood sugar levels yourself using an electronic device called a blood glucose meter. To do this, you prick your fingertip with a small needle, and place a drop of blood on a test strip. The strip is inserted into the blood glucose meter. The digital display shows your blood sugar level shortly afterwards. This is how the blood glucose meter is used: Wash your hands before measuring your blood sugar because dirt and other residues can mix with the blood and distort the results. One small drop of blood is enough for the test. It should just fill the test field. If you prick the side of your finger rather than your fingertip, you feel it less. You can get the right amount of blood by gently squeezing the tip of your finger. After a short while your blood sugar level will be displayed on the meter. Modern devices can save the measurements along with the date and time, and transfer this information to a computer or smartphone. If this is not possible, you could write the measurements down in a special diary. If you measure your blood sugar levels frequently, pricking yourself is less uncomfortable if you use a different finger, or a different place on your finger, each time. It can be helpful to read up about the different available glucose meters and how to use th Continue reading >>

New Home Urine Test Helps Diabetics With Insulin Monitoring

New Home Urine Test Helps Diabetics With Insulin Monitoring

A new easy-to-use home urine test has been developed by scientists in the UK to help people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes check to see if they are producing their own insulin . It is hoped that the home test, which is sent in by post, will replace multiple blood tests that have to be carried out in hospital. The test monitors if patients are still able to make their own insulin even if they are using insulin injections, and can differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, as well as for rare genetic forms of diabetes. The study, involving more than 300 patients and carried out at the Peninsula Medical School in Exeter, and published in the diabetes journals, Diabetic Medicine and Diabetes Care, hopes to help more correct diagnoses of the metabolic condition and will be especially useful for children who find taking blood tests problematic. Rachel Besser, study leader, said "The urine test offers a practical alternative to blood testing. As the urine test can be done in the patients own home we hope that it will be taken up more readily, and more patients can be correctly diagnosed and be offered the correct treatment." Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to Continue reading >>

Home Urine Test Measures Insulin Production In Diabetes

Home Urine Test Measures Insulin Production In Diabetes

A simple home urine test has been developed which can measure if patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are producing their own insulin. The urine test, from Professor Andrew Hattersley’s Exeter-based team at the Peninsula Medical School, replaces multiple blood tests in hospital and can be sent by post as it is stable for up to three days at room temperature. Avoiding blood tests will be a particular advantage for children. The urine test measures if patients are still making their own insulin even if they take insulin injections. Researchers have shown that the test can be used to differentiate Type 1 diabetes from Type 2 diabetes and rare genetic forms of diabetes. Making the correct diagnosis can result in important changes in treatment and the discontinuation of insulin in some cases. Jillian, 35 has recently benefitted from the home urine test. She was diagnosed with diabetes aged 19 and put on insulin injections. The urine test identified that she is still making her own insulin 14 years after being diagnosed and a DNA test confirmed that she has a genetic type of diabetes. After 14 years of insulin treatment, Jillian is now off her insulin injections. “Being told I don’t have to take insulin injections any more has changed my life”, she said. The key studies, led by Dr Rachel Besser and Dr Angus Jones and were funded by Diabetes UK and the National Institute of Health Research, are published in leading diabetes journals, Diabetes Care and Diabetic Medicine. Dr Rachel Besser, who has led the studies on over 300 patients, commented: “The urine test offers a practical alternative to blood testing. As the urine test can be done in the patients own home we hope that it will be taken up more readily, and more patients can be correctly diagnosed and be offe Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs - Testing And Monitoring

Diabetes In Dogs - Testing And Monitoring

By Kristiina Ruotsalo, DVM, DVSc, Dip ACVP, Margo S. Tant BSc, DVM, DVSc, &Robin Downing, DVM, DAAPM, DACVSMR, CVPP Diagnosis What tests are suggested for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in dogs? Generally, the following screening tests are performed when diabetes mellitus is suspected: a complete blood count (CBC), a serum biochemistry profile, and a urinalysis. Why so many tests? Can't diabetes be diagnosed by an elevated blood sugar value alone? Elevated fasting blood and urine glucose (sugar) values are absolutely essential for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, but other screening tests provide additional information regarding the severity of the diabetes, any conditions that may be contributing to the diabetes, and any complications related to the diabetic state. Because diabetes mellitus is usually diagnosed in middle-aged to older dogs, your dog may have other unrelated conditions that need to be managed along with diabetes. The screening tests will usually alert us to any such conditions. What might a CBC reveal if my dog has diabetes mellitus? The complete blood count (CBC) evaluates the red blood cells, the white blood cells, and the platelet components of a blood sample. With uncomplicated diabetes mellitus, these components are often within the normal range. However, changes may occasionally be seen in the red or white cell values. Despite drinking large quantities of water, diabetic dogs lose body water because they produce such dilute urine. Therefore, your dog may actually be dehydrated. Dehydration can be indicated on the CBC by increases in the packed cell volume (PCV - the proportion of the blood volume that is actually occupied by red blood cells) as well as increases in the total red blood cell count. In some severe diabetic states, lysis (ruptu Continue reading >>

Home Urine Test Measures Insulin

Home Urine Test Measures Insulin

A simple home urine test can determine if patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes are producing their own insulin. The urine test can replace multiple blood tests and it can be sent through the mail, as it is stable for up to three days at room temperature because the urine is collected in a container with boric acid. Doctors at the Peninsula Medical School (Exeter, UK) found that the test could measure endogenous insulin production even if patients receive daily insulin injections. In addition, the test can be used to differentiate type 1 from type 2 diabetes, as well as rare genetic forms of diabetes. This type of differential diagnosis can result in important changes in treatment and the discontinuation of insulin in some patients. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-a (HNF1A)/HNF4A) maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is commonly misdiagnosed as type 1 diabetes, resulting in the inappropriate treatment with insulin. Serum C-peptide can be beneficial in the diagnosis of MODY, but practical reasons limit its widespread use. C-peptide is a good candidate biomarker to differentiate patients with MODY from type 1 diabetes. C-peptide is a polypeptide cosecreted in equimolar amounts with insulin. A total of 97 patients with a genetic diagnosis of MODY were recruited; 54 patients with mutations in the HNF1A gene, 23 with HNF4A mutations, and 20 with glucokinase (GCK) mutations. A total of 69 patients with type 1 diabetes were studied, as well as 54 patients with type 2 diabetes. Urinary C-peptide (UCP) was measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay on the E170 analyzer and urinary creatinine was analyzed on the P800 platform (Roche Diagnostics; Mannheim, Germany). The team found that the urinary C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) is a stable measure of endogenous insulin s Continue reading >>

Urine Testing Your Diabetic Cat

Urine Testing Your Diabetic Cat

How to collect a urine sample, and how to use Keto-Diastix, what the results tell you. (And how to amuse your neighbours along the way!) This page is divided into two sections - How to collect a urine sample and how to read Keto-Diastix The purpose of urine testing is two-fold. Firstly you want to determine whether your cat’s blood sugar levels are going so high that the renal threshold is exceeded. Secondly, you want to see if ketones are building up in your cat’s body. There are three types of urine testing strips associated with diabetes on the market. There are Diastix, Ketostix and Keto-Diastix. You can get from any chemists without prescription, but they’re normally behind the counter so you have to ask for them. I strongly recommend that you use Keto-Diastix, as they have a huge advantage over the other two. Diastix just test for glucose in the urine. Ketostix test solely for urinary ketones. Keto-Diastix are a combination and test for both glucose and ketones. Keto-Diastix come in bottles of 50 plastic strips with two reactive squares on each strip. Keto-Diastix are very sensitive to light, heat and moisture and you mustn’t touch the little squares. However, if stored properly they will last for six months. There’s even a little place on the bottle to write down the date you opened it! DO NOT use a reading off a Keto-Diastix strip to adjust an insulin dosage – ever. Urine test strips can only tell you if the renal threshold was exceeded at any time since your cat last had a pee. You cannot equate a urine test strip reading with a blood sugar reading. You cannot say (for example) that 0.5% on a urine test strip is equivalent to a blood sugar reading of 20 or whatever. The only way to accurately determine your cat’s blood glucose level is by doing a Continue reading >>

Urine Test Kits

Urine Test Kits

What is the difference between the urine test kits for people with diabetes? Three different kinds of urine testing kits are available for testing three different substances in the urine: glucose (sugar), ketones, and microscopic amounts of protein (microalbuminuria). Glucose test kits Before the development of blood glucose meters, urine testing was the only method for gauging a person's sugar levels. However, it has always been a very imprecise method for testing glucose levels for a variety of reasons: Urine test strips cannot detect glucose (sugar) until the blood glucose level is above 180 mg/dl. This means a person's blood sugar level could still be high (hyperglycemia) or even dangerously low (hypoglycemia) but still not be detected. Urine glucose testing is highly subject to user error because it requires color interpretation of the urine test strip via a color-scale comparison. This becomes an issue with people who are colorblind or have poor eyesight, and certain drugs and vitamin C can change the color of the urine and thus provide an invalid measurement. The reading reflects the level of blood glucose from a few hours earlier - not at the present moment - and often is misinterpreted. As a result of these shortcomings, healthcare professionals recommend that anyone needing to closely monitor blood glucose levels use a blood glucose meter. However, urine strips can be useful in certain populations who physically cannot or will not test themselves with a blood glucose meter. Ketone test kits Ketone bodies are the byproducts of the body burning fat, rather than glucose, to provide energy. When fat is used for energy instead of glucose, the preferred fuel source, the liver produces substances called ketones. If ketones build up, they can lead to a life-threatenin Continue reading >>

Pet Health: Glucose Monitoring & Insulin Adjustment Using Urine Test Strips

Pet Health: Glucose Monitoring & Insulin Adjustment Using Urine Test Strips

Adjusting Insulin Dosages Using Urine Strip Results Dawn M. Williams, DVM, 2004 Some people prefer to check glucose levels in their cats by testing the urine. When blood glucose levels get too high, the kidneys cannot filter all of this and glucose "spills" into the urine. Guidelines indicate that glucose will spill into the urine when blood glucose levels are above 220 mg/dl. Individual cats will have different levels based on age, kidney damage, and other factors. When the blood glucose is within the normal range, no glucose will show up in the urine. Although this method of monitoring means you can do it at home without sticking your cat for a blood sample, there are some problems. There is a "lag" before the glucose shows up in the urine. This means that if you see glucose in the urine, they may reflect a high blood glucose several hours before, not necessarily currently. However, if you have glucose show up in the urine every time you test, you can be pretty sure that your cat needs an insulin dose adjustment. Also, please be aware that urine strips cannot tell you if your animal is becoming HYPOglycemic (blood sugar too low) and needs a lower insulin dose. Hypoglycemia can be fatal or induce neurological damage. Once your pet is well regulated, you may want to consider switching to home blood glucose testing. As always, please consult with your veterinarian. In the initial stages of therapy the usual recommendation is to test three times per day. After regulation has been achieved, routine tests before the morning meal two to three times weekly will be enough to let you know if your pet is staying regulated. Suggested times for doing urine glucose tests are Directly before the morning meal (e.g. 7-8 a.m.) Around the time of the 2nd meal (e.g. 3-4 p.m.) In the even Continue reading >>

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Blood sugar (glucose) measurements are used to diagnose diabetes. They are also used to monitor glucose control for those people who are already known to have diabetes. Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If your glucose level remains high then you have diabetes. If the level goes too low then it is called hypoglycaemia. The main tests for measuring the amount of glucose in the blood are: Random blood glucose level. Fasting blood glucose level. The HbA1c blood test. Oral glucose tolerance test. Capillary blood glucose (home monitoring). Urine test for blood sugar (glucose). Blood tests for blood sugar (glucose) Random blood glucose level A sample of blood taken at any time can be a useful test if diabetes is suspected. A level of 11.1 mmol/L or more in the blood sample indicates that you have diabetes. A fasting blood glucose test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. Fasting blood glucose level Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Home Urine Test Measures Insulin Production In Diabetes

Home Urine Test Measures Insulin Production In Diabetes

Home Urine Test Measures Insulin Production in Diabetes: Throughout years of diabetic diagnosis and treatments, one thing that people continue to dislike is the many blood tests they have to endure to check for insulin production. Children who have diabetes can highly attest to this. However, every year brings a chance for something new, something that helps take some of the pain away when it comes to testing for insulin production and this year, it’s an at home urine test. Children and adults alike would much rather take a urine test than a blood test. Urinating is something a person does naturally and does not hurt while bleeding is caused by a prick or poke and does cause pain. So of course, if given the option, they would choose a urine test and many diabetic patients are now finding out that they are given the option upon medical visits. This urine test, designed, by Andrew Hattersley’s Exeter-based team at the Peninsula Medical School was developed for patients of have type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It was designed specifically to check for insulin production in one’s body, to make sure that the person being tested is creating their own insulin. It is quickly replacing blood tests in many hospitals and it is becoming highly popular among children who no longer have to deal with a painful prick or poke. For patients who must take insulin injections, the at-home urine test measures their ability to make their own insulin without the need of an insulin injections. The test has met requirements for patients suffering from type 1, type 2 and rare types of diabetes. Jillian, a woman of 35 years has recently tested the new at home urine test and found herself to be pleasantly surprise with the outcome. Jillian was diagnosed with diabetes when she was 19. Quickly, she Continue reading >>

Urine Glucose Testing

Urine Glucose Testing

General concept Accuracy Limitations of urine test strips Barney's example (potentially fatal mistake) A little humor How urine glucose testing works Many vets recommend urine glucose testing as a method of monitoring your pet's diabetes at home. It is simple and inexpensive. But it has some serious limitations that must be understood and taken into consideration. Urine glucose testing is based on the fact that excessive amounts of glucose in the blood will be filtered by the kidneys into the urine. Once the amount of glucose in the blood exceeds the renal threshold (180 mg/dL) , glucose is spilled into the urine. The renal threshold is the level at the kidneys can not "process" any more blood glucose and it spills into the urine. If the blood glucose is high for an extended period of time, glucose is usually present in the urine. The amount of glucose present in the urine depends on how high the blood glucose was, and how long the blood glucose was high. Urine glucose test strips like the pictures shown below are used. The test strip has a little test area at the end that is dipped into urine or held in the urine stream. After a certain amount of time, the color of the test area is compared to a reference color chart. Bayer makes several types of urine tests strips. Diastix and Clinistix test only for urine glucose. Keto-Diastix test for both glucose and ketones. The Diastix have more "levels" of glucose measurement than the Clinistix. Follow the instructions that come with your test strips, and use the reference color chart on the bottle or box. The picture shown below is just an example - the colors are NOT to be used to compare your urine test strip. The color chart tells you approximately how much glucose has spilled into your pet's urine. Note: Different test stri Continue reading >>

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