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Home Urine Insulin Test

Urine Testing Stix

Urine Testing Stix

Human and animal diabetics both use ketostix or ketodiastix. These are reagent indicator strips that test urine for only ketone (ketostix) or for both ketones and glucose (ketodiastix). These links show examples of Ketostix[1] and Ketodiastix[2]. These stix are available at any brick-and-mortar or Internet pharmacy that sells human diabetic supplies. Stix do expire, so check the unopened expiration date when you buy them and record the date you open them. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use; prolonged exposure to air can produce false negative urine ketone test results[3]. If the foil-wrapped Ketostix, rather than the ones in vials are purchased, you may find it less wasteful. After the bottle is opened, the remaining unused strips have only a 6 months' life. By using the foil-wrapped ones, you can extend the "life" of your purchase. The singly-wrapped ones can have a unopened expiration date of up to two years. You are then only using what you need when you need it, having the rest still sealed and potent until the indicated expiration date[4]. You should test your pet's urine for ketones for the reasons discussed at ketones. You may test your pet's urine for glucose because (1) you've been instructed to do so by the vet as a method of gauging regulation, (2) your pet is undiagnosed and you want to determine whether there is hyperglycemia, or (3) your cat is in remission and you want to determine whether there is hyperglycemia. Some reasons for preferring testing glucose levels by using blood over urine testing is that the urine used in testing may have been in the bladder for hours. Because of this, it may not be a reliable indicator of what systemic glucose levels are at the time of testing[5]. What's seen when testing urine for glucose is an average of wh Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Lab Test Results

Understanding Your Lab Test Results

Diabetes is a chronic condition that requires an enormous amount of self-care and that can affect many parts of the body. Because of this, people who have diabetes are generally advised to visit their doctors multiple times a year and also to see various specialists (such as endocrinologists, podiatrists, and eye doctors) periodically to screen for potential problems and treat any complications that arise. Along with blood pressure readings and inspection of the feet and eyes, there are a number of laboratory tests recommended by the American Diabetes Association. These tests are used to track blood glucose control, kidney function, cardiovascular health, and other areas of health. Although you certainly can’t and won’t be expected to analyze the lab report when your test results come back, knowing a little bit about what your report says can be a way for you to more fully understand and take charge of your health. If it isn’t already your doctor’s regular practice to give you copies of your lab reports, ask for a copy the next time you have lab tests done. Use the information in this article to learn more about what lab reports show, and discuss your results with your doctor to learn what your results mean with regards to your health. Lab reports All lab reports share certain standard features, regardless of the test(s) they show. A Federal law, the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act, regulates all aspects of clinical laboratory testing. It states exactly what information must be included in your lab test report. Some of the standard features include the following: • Your name and a unique identification number, which may be either your birth date or a medical record number assigned to you by the lab. • The name and address of the lab that tested your bloo Continue reading >>

Urine Test For Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Urine Test For Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Urine tests can check for a range of things, including blood in the urine, infection, and other systemic conditions. They are frequently used for diagnosing and monitoring diabetes. In this article, we look at types of urine tests for diabetes and how to understand the results. Contents of this article: What is a urine test for diabetes? Urine tests are important for both the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. Urine testing is less accurate than blood testing but is useful as a screening test for people who already know they have diabetes. Urine tests can also be used to check for glucose in the urine of people who are undiagnosed. A urine test will be looking for three things: glucose, ketones, and protein. Glucose Having glucose in the urine may indicate diabetes, although it can also be caused by other conditions. For example, pregnant women who do not have diabetes may have glucose in their urine. Glucose is not normally found in urine, but it can pass from the kidneys into the urine in people who have diabetes. Ketones Ketone is a chemical that the body produces when there is a shortage of insulin in the blood. It is a by-product produced when the body starts to break down body fat for energy. The presence of ketones in a person with diabetes may indicate a high blood glucose level, usually because a person with diabetes cannot use glucose as energy and has to use fat instead. Ketones in the blood can then spill into the urine. Ketones in the urine are more common in people who have type 1 diabetes but can occur in those with type 2 diabetes as well. Protein A doctor will check for the presence of protein in the urine of people with diabetes, as this can indicate kidney problems or a urinary tract infection. Types of tests If someone is concerned that they may h Continue reading >>

Urine Glucose Testing

Urine Glucose Testing

General concept Accuracy Limitations of urine test strips Barney's example (potentially fatal mistake) A little humor How urine glucose testing works Many vets recommend urine glucose testing as a method of monitoring your pet's diabetes at home. It is simple and inexpensive. But it has some serious limitations that must be understood and taken into consideration. Urine glucose testing is based on the fact that excessive amounts of glucose in the blood will be filtered by the kidneys into the urine. Once the amount of glucose in the blood exceeds the renal threshold (180 mg/dL) , glucose is spilled into the urine. The renal threshold is the level at the kidneys can not "process" any more blood glucose and it spills into the urine. If the blood glucose is high for an extended period of time, glucose is usually present in the urine. The amount of glucose present in the urine depends on how high the blood glucose was, and how long the blood glucose was high. Urine glucose test strips like the pictures shown below are used. The test strip has a little test area at the end that is dipped into urine or held in the urine stream. After a certain amount of time, the color of the test area is compared to a reference color chart. Bayer makes several types of urine tests strips. Diastix and Clinistix test only for urine glucose. Keto-Diastix test for both glucose and ketones. The Diastix have more "levels" of glucose measurement than the Clinistix. Follow the instructions that come with your test strips, and use the reference color chart on the bottle or box. The picture shown below is just an example - the colors are NOT to be used to compare your urine test strip. The color chart tells you approximately how much glucose has spilled into your pet's urine. Note: Different test stri Continue reading >>

New Home Urine Test Helps Diabetics With Insulin Monitoring

New Home Urine Test Helps Diabetics With Insulin Monitoring

A new easy-to-use home urine test has been developed by scientists in the UK to help people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes check to see if they are producing their own insulin . It is hoped that the home test, which is sent in by post, will replace multiple blood tests that have to be carried out in hospital. The test monitors if patients are still able to make their own insulin even if they are using insulin injections, and can differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, as well as for rare genetic forms of diabetes. The study, involving more than 300 patients and carried out at the Peninsula Medical School in Exeter, and published in the diabetes journals, Diabetic Medicine and Diabetes Care, hopes to help more correct diagnoses of the metabolic condition and will be especially useful for children who find taking blood tests problematic. Rachel Besser, study leader, said "The urine test offers a practical alternative to blood testing. As the urine test can be done in the patients own home we hope that it will be taken up more readily, and more patients can be correctly diagnosed and be offered the correct treatment." Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to Continue reading >>

Glucose (sugar) Monitoring

Glucose (sugar) Monitoring

Monitoring glucose (sugar) levels in urine or blood has always been part of the insulin users’ daily routine. The first home tests involved boiling urine over an alcohol burner and observing color change after adding a chemical reagent. Later kits replaced the alcohol and liquid chemicals with reactive tablets which required no exterior heat source. By the 1960s color changing testing strips were developed which reacted directly with urine. Today, most testing is done using blood glucose, rather than urine glucose. Blood glucose testing was not possible outside of the laboratory until the 1970s when the first test strips and digital blood glucose monitoring devices became available for home use. Examination of Urine for Sugar with the Urine Sugar Test Case, Sheftel, from Diabetes Mellitus by Eli Lilly and Company. 1942. Continue reading >>

Ketone Testing: What You Need To Know

Ketone Testing: What You Need To Know

What are ketones? Ketones are produced when the body burns fat for energy or fuel. They are also produced when you lose weight or if there is not enough insulin to help your body use sugar for energy. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the blood. Since the body is unable to use glucose for energy, it breaks down fat instead. When this occurs, ketones form in the blood and spill into the urine. These ketones can make you very sick. How can I test for ketones? You can test to see if your body is making any ketones by doing a simple urine test. There are several products available for ketone testing and they can be purchased, without a prescription, at your pharmacy. The test result can be negative, or show small, moderate, or large quantities of ketones. When should I test for ketones? Anytime your blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl for two tests in a row. When you are ill. Often illness, infections, or injuries will cause sudden high blood glucose and this is an especially important time to check for ketones. When you are planning to exercise and the blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl. If you are pregnant, you should test for ketones each morning before breakfast and any time the blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl. If ketones are positive, what does this mean? There are situations when you might have ketones without the blood glucose being too high. Positive ketones are not a problem when blood glucose levels are within range and you are trying to lose weight. It is a problem if blood glucose levels are high and left untreated. Untreated high blood glucose with positive ketones can lead to a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). What should I do if the ketone test is positive? Call your diabetes educator or physician, as you may need additional Continue reading >>

Do Diy Testing Kits Really Work?

Do Diy Testing Kits Really Work?

by CHARLOTTE DOVEY, Daily Mail Home testing kits, readily available from chemists or via the internet, claim to be able to detect the early warning signs for conditions ranging from Alzheimer's disease to prostate cancer. But should such tests be carried out without proper medical guidance and support? And are the results conclusive? We purchased six kits and asked key medical experts to give their verdict. BOWEL DISORDERS Bowel cancer is the second most common form of disease after lung cancer. About 35,600 people are diagnosed every year and around 16,300 people die from the disease. It is, however, one of the most curable cancers if caught early. Symptoms include blood in the stool, a need to go to the lavatory more often, unexplained weight loss and persistent tummy pains. Boots Home Test: Bowel, £12 Claims: In two minutes, this test indicates the presence of blood in the stool and may help in the early detection of bowel cancer. How it works: Special tissues dropped into the toilet bowl change colour if blood is present. The test is carried out on three consecutive days. Verdict: A spokesman for the Digestive Disorders Foundation (020 7486 0341, www.digestivedisorders.org.uk) says that the method has been used in hospitals and GP practices for years. But when carried out in your own home, this test could be overly alarming. Bleeding in the stools does not necessarily mean cancer: it is usually due to haemorrhoids or something non-malignant. Also, you can have cancer without bleeding. What the test lacks is the necessary support. It should be carried out - and analysed - by professionals. ____________________________________________ OSTEOPOROSIS A condition in which bones become fragile and more likely to break. More women die after hip fractures than from cancer o Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Measuring Sugar Levels In Blood And Urine Yourself

Type 1 Diabetes: Measuring Sugar Levels In Blood And Urine Yourself

Many people with diabetes measure their blood sugar levels on their own. For those who inject insulin several times a day, checking their sugar levels with a blood glucose meter is an important part of their daily treatment. The amount of insulin that is injected at mealtimes depends on various factors, including the measured blood sugar level. Sugar levels in blood or urine can be measured in various ways. Sugar levels can also be measured in body tissue. Measuring blood sugar levels yourself You can measure your blood sugar levels yourself using an electronic device called a blood glucose meter. To do this, you prick your fingertip with a small needle, and place a drop of blood on a test strip. The strip is inserted into the blood glucose meter. The digital display shows your blood sugar level shortly afterwards. This is how the blood glucose meter is used: Wash your hands before measuring your blood sugar because dirt and other residues can mix with the blood and distort the results. One small drop of blood is enough for the test. It should just fill the test field. If you prick the side of your finger rather than your fingertip, you feel it less. You can get the right amount of blood by gently squeezing the tip of your finger. After a short while your blood sugar level will be displayed on the meter. Modern devices can save the measurements along with the date and time, and transfer this information to a computer or smartphone. If this is not possible, you could write the measurements down in a special diary. If you measure your blood sugar levels frequently, pricking yourself is less uncomfortable if you use a different finger, or a different place on your finger, each time. It can be helpful to read up about the different available glucose meters and how to use th Continue reading >>

Urine Testing Your Diabetic Cat

Urine Testing Your Diabetic Cat

How to collect a urine sample, and how to use Keto-Diastix, what the results tell you. (And how to amuse your neighbours along the way!) This page is divided into two sections - How to collect a urine sample and how to read Keto-Diastix The purpose of urine testing is two-fold. Firstly you want to determine whether your cat’s blood sugar levels are going so high that the renal threshold is exceeded. Secondly, you want to see if ketones are building up in your cat’s body. There are three types of urine testing strips associated with diabetes on the market. There are Diastix, Ketostix and Keto-Diastix. You can get from any chemists without prescription, but they’re normally behind the counter so you have to ask for them. I strongly recommend that you use Keto-Diastix, as they have a huge advantage over the other two. Diastix just test for glucose in the urine. Ketostix test solely for urinary ketones. Keto-Diastix are a combination and test for both glucose and ketones. Keto-Diastix come in bottles of 50 plastic strips with two reactive squares on each strip. Keto-Diastix are very sensitive to light, heat and moisture and you mustn’t touch the little squares. However, if stored properly they will last for six months. There’s even a little place on the bottle to write down the date you opened it! DO NOT use a reading off a Keto-Diastix strip to adjust an insulin dosage – ever. Urine test strips can only tell you if the renal threshold was exceeded at any time since your cat last had a pee. You cannot equate a urine test strip reading with a blood sugar reading. You cannot say (for example) that 0.5% on a urine test strip is equivalent to a blood sugar reading of 20 or whatever. The only way to accurately determine your cat’s blood glucose level is by doing a Continue reading >>

Pet Health: Glucose Monitoring & Insulin Adjustment Using Urine Test Strips

Pet Health: Glucose Monitoring & Insulin Adjustment Using Urine Test Strips

Adjusting Insulin Dosages Using Urine Strip Results Dawn M. Williams, DVM, 2004 Some people prefer to check glucose levels in their cats by testing the urine. When blood glucose levels get too high, the kidneys cannot filter all of this and glucose "spills" into the urine. Guidelines indicate that glucose will spill into the urine when blood glucose levels are above 220 mg/dl. Individual cats will have different levels based on age, kidney damage, and other factors. When the blood glucose is within the normal range, no glucose will show up in the urine. Although this method of monitoring means you can do it at home without sticking your cat for a blood sample, there are some problems. There is a "lag" before the glucose shows up in the urine. This means that if you see glucose in the urine, they may reflect a high blood glucose several hours before, not necessarily currently. However, if you have glucose show up in the urine every time you test, you can be pretty sure that your cat needs an insulin dose adjustment. Also, please be aware that urine strips cannot tell you if your animal is becoming HYPOglycemic (blood sugar too low) and needs a lower insulin dose. Hypoglycemia can be fatal or induce neurological damage. Once your pet is well regulated, you may want to consider switching to home blood glucose testing. As always, please consult with your veterinarian. In the initial stages of therapy the usual recommendation is to test three times per day. After regulation has been achieved, routine tests before the morning meal two to three times weekly will be enough to let you know if your pet is staying regulated. Suggested times for doing urine glucose tests are Directly before the morning meal (e.g. 7-8 a.m.) Around the time of the 2nd meal (e.g. 3-4 p.m.) In the even Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs - Testing And Monitoring

Diabetes In Dogs - Testing And Monitoring

By Kristiina Ruotsalo, DVM, DVSc, Dip ACVP, Margo S. Tant BSc, DVM, DVSc, &Robin Downing, DVM, DAAPM, DACVSMR, CVPP Diagnosis What tests are suggested for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in dogs? Generally, the following screening tests are performed when diabetes mellitus is suspected: a complete blood count (CBC), a serum biochemistry profile, and a urinalysis. Why so many tests? Can't diabetes be diagnosed by an elevated blood sugar value alone? Elevated fasting blood and urine glucose (sugar) values are absolutely essential for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, but other screening tests provide additional information regarding the severity of the diabetes, any conditions that may be contributing to the diabetes, and any complications related to the diabetic state. Because diabetes mellitus is usually diagnosed in middle-aged to older dogs, your dog may have other unrelated conditions that need to be managed along with diabetes. The screening tests will usually alert us to any such conditions. What might a CBC reveal if my dog has diabetes mellitus? The complete blood count (CBC) evaluates the red blood cells, the white blood cells, and the platelet components of a blood sample. With uncomplicated diabetes mellitus, these components are often within the normal range. However, changes may occasionally be seen in the red or white cell values. Despite drinking large quantities of water, diabetic dogs lose body water because they produce such dilute urine. Therefore, your dog may actually be dehydrated. Dehydration can be indicated on the CBC by increases in the packed cell volume (PCV - the proportion of the blood volume that is actually occupied by red blood cells) as well as increases in the total red blood cell count. In some severe diabetic states, lysis (ruptu Continue reading >>

What Good Is Urine Testing For Diabetic Pets? – Part 2

What Good Is Urine Testing For Diabetic Pets? – Part 2

Last week’s newsletter was about the value of running a periodic urinalysis – not just for diabetics but for pets who are ill or as screening tests for senior pets. Clearly pet owners won’t be able to run the microscopic portion of a urinalysis, but there are urine dipsticks available that can be run in the home that may help you and your vet make decisions about your pet’s management. The most valuable bits of information on these dipsticks for diabetic pet owners are the glucose and the ketone tests, but many dipsticks have other information beside glucose and ketones. Glucose: Urine glucose used to be an important part of diabetic pet home management. You caught that, I said “used to be”. This kind of went by the wayside when home glucose monitors became so darned accurate and easy to use. Urine glucose testing gives us a general idea of what a pet’s blood glucose is over the span of time since the pet last urinated. If the urine glucose square on the dipstick comes up really high then clearly this indicates higher glucose in the urine which indicates higher glucose in the blood. If the square has little or no glucose showing then the glucose didn’t or barely exceeded the kidneys’ glucose threshold. Now comes the tricky bit: we don’t know exactly what the threshold is for dogs and cat for when glucose spills over into the urine at the level of the kidneys. We’ve got a range, but it may be different for individual pets. In general we find glucosuria when the blood glucose exceeds the mid 200’s in dogs and somewhere between the mid 200’s to 300-ish for cats. So then why can urine glucose testing be useful with all this guessing? Perhaps the most common indication is for a kitty who is going into diabetic remission! Say you feed low carb food, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Urine Tests

Diabetes Urine Tests

Urine tests may be done in people with diabetes to evaluate severe hyperglycemia (severe high blood sugar) by looking for ketones in the urine. Ketones are a metabolic product produced when fat is metabolized. Ketones increase when there is insufficient insulin to use glucose for energy. Urine tests are also done to look for the presence of protein in the urine, which is a sign of kidney damage. Urine glucose measurements are less reliable than blood glucose measurements and are not used to diagnose diabetes or evaluate treatment for diabetes. They may be used for screening purposes. Testing for ketones is most common in people with type 1 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms? This test detects the presence of ketones, which are byproducts of metabolism that form in the presence of severe hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar). Ketones are formed from fat that is burned by the body when there is insufficient insulin to allow glucose to be used for fuel. When ketones build up to high levels, ketoacidosis (a serious and life-threatening condition) may occur. Ketone testing can be performed both at home and in the clinical laboratory. Ketones can be detected by dipping a test strip into a sample of urine. A color change on the test strip signals the presence of ketones in the urine. Ketones occur most commonly in people with type 1 diabetes, but uncommonly, people with type 2 diabetes may test positive for ketones. The microalbumin test detects microalbumin, a type of protein, in the urine. Protein is present in the urine when there is damage to the kidneys. Since the damage to blood vessels that occurs as a complication of diabetes can lead to kidney problems, the microalbumin test is done to check for damage to the kidneys over time. Can urine tests be used to Continue reading >>

Monitoring Diabetes

Monitoring Diabetes

Even after a long period of stability, your dog or cat's insulin requirements may change as a result of: Change in exercise regimen This is why it's important to continually monitor your pet's progress and consult your veterinarian if there are sudden changes or if anything unusual happens. Monitoring your dog's or cat's glucose level Monitoring your pet's glucose level is an important part of the overall therapy for diabetes and can be done in 2 ways: Checking your pet's urine for the presence of glucose and ketones (a chemical produced by the body when it burns fat for energy). This is not as accurate as measuring glucose in the blood, but can be done at home easily. Measuring glucose level in your pet's blood. This is the most accurate method and is done either by your veterinarian in the clinic or at home with a portable glucometer and blood test strips. If your pet has significant weight gain or loss, talk to your veterinarian about how this may affect diabetes treatment. Monitoring glucose and ketones in your pet's urine Immediately following diagnosis, your veterinarian may ask you to check your pet's urine glucose, 1 to 3 times a day: FOR DOGS Early in the morning, just prior to the time of the Vetsulin injection and first meal. Late in the afternoon, before the second meal. Late in the evening. As your pet's management progresses, less frequent testing will be needed. Regular examinations remain important though, because your pet's insulin needs can change. What you need Clean containers for collecting urine. Urine dipsticks from your veterinarian. A place to record results. Collecting urine For dogs: take your dog out for a walk on a leash. Keep your dog on a leash so that it will be within reach when it urinates. For cats: place your cat in its litter box.* H Continue reading >>

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