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High Insulin Normal A1c

Does High Insulin Cause Weight Gain?

Does High Insulin Cause Weight Gain?

Tweet Does high insulin cause weight gain? Over the years Americans have been getting higher fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c blood levels. A study from Life Extension Magazine showed 66% higher than desired fasting insulin. Twenty-Two percent had hemoglobin A1c levels that placed them in a pre-diabetic state. Hemoglobin A1c measures the percentage of glycated hemoglobin in one’s blood. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be below 5.6% yet more than one in five people test over 6%. Gaining access to this kind of information can prevent severe diabetic related illness. Insulin is a hormone that regulates carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Insulin enables liver and muscle cells to take up blood sugar (glucose) for energy production or storage. Insulin also helps to pack glucose into the fat cells as triglycerides. Once a burst of insulin is released in response to food ingestion, insulin levels should drop below 5 uIU/ml and only a small amount of insulin should be needed to maintain balance. When the fasting insulin levels are above 5 uIU/ml, this indicates a pre-diabetic state that increases the risk of degenerative disease. In people with metabolic disorders or obesity insulin levels remain elevated. While this creates cellular damage it also prevents weight loss by forcing glucose into the fat cells as storage. In a condition called hyperinsulinemia the pancreas stimulates the uptake of glucose from blood into the body’s cells. The inability of the body’s cells to utilize the insulin is called insulin resistance. In hyperinsulinemia the pancreas produces more insulin than normal so there are higher levels of insulin circulating in the blood stream. Normally to process 10mg of sugar a person would have to produce one unit of insulin, but in a person with hyperinsulinemi Continue reading >>

Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance

Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. The pancreas contains clusters of cells called islets. Beta cells within the islets make insulin and release it into the blood. Insulin plays a major role in metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for energy. The digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates—sugars and starches found in many foods—into glucose. Glucose is a form of sugar that enters the bloodstream. With the help of insulin, cells throughout the body absorb glucose and use it for energy. Insulin's Role in Blood Glucose Control When blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin into the blood. Insulin and glucose then travel in the blood to cells throughout the body. Insulin helps muscle, fat, and liver cells absorb glucose from the bloodstream, lowering blood glucose levels. Insulin stimulates the liver and muscle tissue to store excess glucose. The stored form of glucose is called glycogen. Insulin also lowers blood glucose levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. In a healthy person, these functions allow blood glucose and insulin levels to remain in the normal range. What happens with insulin resistance? In insulin resistance, muscle, fat, and liver cells do not respond properly to insulin and thus cannot easily absorb glucose from the bloodstream. As a result, the body needs higher levels of insulin to help glucose enter cells. The beta cells in the pancreas try to keep up with this increased demand for insulin by producing more. As long as the beta cells are able to produce enough insulin to overcome the insulin resistance, blood glucose levels stay in the healthy range. Over time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes and prediabetes because the bet Continue reading >>

Signs Of Insulin Resistance

Signs Of Insulin Resistance

What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas. It allows your cells to use glucose (sugar) for energy. People with insulin resistance have cells throughout their bodies that don’t use insulin effectively. This means the cells have trouble absorbing glucose, which causes a buildup of sugar in their blood. If your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes, you have a condition called prediabetes caused by insulin resistance. It’s not entirely clear why some people develop insulin resistance and others don’t. A sedentary lifestyle and being overweight increases the chance of developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. The effects of insulin resistance Insulin resistance typically doesn’t trigger any noticeable symptoms. You could be insulin resistant for years without knowing, especially if your blood glucose levels aren’t checked. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that nearly 70 percent of individuals with insulin resistance and prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes if significant lifestyle changes aren’t made. Some people with insulin resistance may develop a skin condition known as acanthosis nigricans. This condition creates dark patches often on the back of the neck, groin, and armpits. Some experts believe it may be caused by a buildup of insulin within skin cells. There’s no cure for acanthosis nigricans, but if caused by a specific condition, treatment may allow for some of your natural skin color to return. Insulin resistance increases the risk of being overweight, having high triglycerides, and having elevated blood pressure. Since insulin resistance increases your risk for progressing to diabetes, you may not notice right away if you develop Continue reading >>

What Does High Insulin Mean?

What Does High Insulin Mean?

If your health care provider has informed you that your insulin is high, you have every right to feel concerned. Insulin is a crucial hormone secreted from your pancreas, and it plays a major role in energy production. When you eat carbohydrates and your blood sugar rises, your pancreas releases insulin to bring blood sugar levels back to normal. Insulin helps glucose get into your cells so your body can use it for fuel. High insulin is a sign of insulin resistance and can lead to problems with glucose control. Video of the Day When you have insulin resistance, your body is insensitive to the effects of insulin. The pancreas secretes more insulin to compensate for this and helps glucose levels stay within a healthy range. Most people who have insulin resistance aren't aware of it, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. The pancreas can compensate by producing higher levels of insulin for many years. Eventually this can lead to type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes commonly occurs in individuals who have insulin resistance, according to the NDIC. In prediabetes, the insulin producing cells in your pancreas, called beta cells, are no longer able to keep up with the added demand to produce enough insulin to overcome insulin resistance. Once this happens, glucose levels rise above normal, because a lack of insulin is not able to keep glucose within a healthy range. Over time, higher-than-normal glucose levels set the stage for type 2 diabetes. Science has yet to determine the exact cause of insulin resistance. Experts believe, however, that excess weight, particularly around the midsection -- along with lack of exercise -- are contributing factors, according to the NDIC. Regularly consuming excess calories promotes weight gain, and as your waist circumference Continue reading >>

"it Isn't Possible To Be Insulin Resistant And Have A 5.2% A1c." - My Doctor

"It isn't possible to be insulin resistant and have a 5.2% A1C." - my doctor I would see if you could get an OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) along with insulin levels. Diagnosed: 6/30/11 (failed OGTT with bg around 260 at 2 hours) A1C at diagnosis: 5.6 4/9/12 A1c: 5.5 10/22/12 A1c: 5.5 6/4/13 A1c: 5.7 8/9/13 A1c: 5.3 None of us should be commenting on your post without medical training (DD's rules, not mine.) And you left out three important details, age, height, and weight. See another doctor if you are having trouble believing the first one. We all sympathize with your condition, but we cannot give advice since the vast majority of us are not doctors with the requisite medical training (and license...) T2 diagnosed in March 2012, initial A1C: 11% Metformin 1000 mg before breakfast and after dinner, Invokana 100mg before breakfast. Current lab tested A1C: 6.3% Goal is to stay in the 5.x range. Glucose Buddy A1C estimate: 6.0% It's my life and I want to live it to the fullest. I am no longer a "foodie". I eat to live, not live to eat. D.D. Family Glucose Disregulation since 2005 While I agree you should always consult with medical professionals for diagnosis and treatment of your diabetes, you owe it to yourself to be smart. The plain fact is that many medical professionals are not particularly competent and much of the mainstream advice is inherently flawed. Of particular concern is that the fasting blood sugar test and HbA1c are lagging indicators of diabetes and abnormal blood sugar regulation. The diabetes researcher Ralph Defronzo suggests that by the time you are diagnosed with outright diabetes, you have lost 80% of your beta cell function. And in truth, for many people, diabetes is a long and hidden road. For many with blood sugar disregulation, testing bloo Continue reading >>

Do You Know Your Insulin Level?

Do You Know Your Insulin Level?

People often keep close watch on their glucose numbers. But how many of us know our insulin level? Dr. Joseph Mercola says fasting insulin is “the number that may best predict your sudden death.” Sounds important. But what does it mean? Our bodies need some circulating insulin at all times, even when we don’t eat. Otherwise, our livers keep making glucose and dumping it into the blood. Livers do this to prevent blood glucose from going too low. So a fasting insulin level should never be 0, which it might be in a person with untreated Type 1. It shouldn’t go below 3. But a high insulin level is just as problematic. A high insulin level is a sign of insulin resistance or prediabetes. It can also signify early-stage Type 2. According to Dr. Mercola, too much insulin promotes weight gain by storing fat. It promotes insulin resistance, lowers magnesium levels, and increases inflammation. It also tends to lower HDL (“good”) cholesterol and raise levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. All of these increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease. It may be that high insulin levels come before insulin resistance and help cause it. If you already have diabetes, why should you know your insulin level? Mainly, it helps diagnose what is happening with you. Your blood glucose may be high, but how much of the problem is too little insulin? How much is insulin resistance? A fasting insulin level test is valuable in several situations: • Diagnosing prediabetes and metabolic syndrome. “Prediabetes” is one result of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance causes high cholesterol, high glucose, and high blood pressure. A high level of fasting insulin indicates insulin resistance and can encourage a person to make changes to lower it. • Separating Type 2 from LADA (latent Continue reading >>

High Insulin, Normal Blood Sugar Levels. What Is It?

High Insulin, Normal Blood Sugar Levels. What Is It?

Is it hypoglycemia? What do I eat with that? I know how to cure type 2 diabetes (Newcastle study) but not sure if it is the same for high insulin levels. I have checked all hypoglycemia plans and it seems that they say to have a snack every 2 hours plus a serving of grain with every meal. Is there anybody here who took care of their hypoglycemia with Paleo and devised a special meal plan? Thanks! Continue reading >>

Blood Levels Of Insulin And Hemoglobin A1c In Foundation Members

Blood Levels Of Insulin And Hemoglobin A1c In Foundation Members

Life Extension® has an advantage in identifying modern causes of premature aging and death. That’s because we have direct access to tens of thousands of our members’ blood test results. Our review of this real-world data enables us to uncover disease risk factors that are overlooked by the mainstream media. We then alert members about simple steps they can take to mitigate these hazards. Earlier this year, we analyzed fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c blood levels in over 10,000 members. A startling 66% had higher than desired fasting insulin. Twenty-two percent had hemoglobin A1c levels that placed them in a pre-diabetic state. Hemoglobin A1c measures the percentage of glycated hemoglobin in one’s blood. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be below 5.6%,1 yet more than one in five people we tested had a reading over 6%. Gaining early access to this kind of data can spare aging humans the ravages of degenerative illness. Armed with this knowledge, Foundation members can slash their risk of cancer, vascular occlusion, and other complications before frank diabetes is diagnosed. This article will describe the dangers of elevated fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c, our recent analysis of member blood tests, and a novel way to protect against glycemic overload. What Is Insulin Supposed to Do? Insulin is a hormone that regulates carbohydrate and fat metabolism.2 Insulin enables liver and muscle cells to take up blood sugar (glucose) for energy production or storage.2 Insulin also facilitates the packing of glucose into fat cells as triglycerides.2 A burst of insulin is released in response to food ingestion. Once glucose has been safely shuttled into energy producing cells or stored, insulin levels should drop below 5 µIU/mL.3 Only a tiny amount of residual insulin should b Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar & Insulin Resistance Correlate With High T3

High Blood Sugar & Insulin Resistance Correlate With High T3

High blood sugar, insulin resistance, or high fasting blood glucose may all be caused by high T3 levels. Many on the T3-only protocol or high doses of desiccated thyroid notice their blood sugar levels rising and wonder why. It’s because thyroid levels, either too high or too low, have a direct impact on blood glucose. Hypothyroidism may cause high blood sugar & insulin resistance A1C levels of hypothyroid patients are generally higher than normal, and in one study, replacement with thyroid hormone brought the A1C down, but it did not lower fasting blood glucose. [1] A1C is a measure of average blood glucose levels over several months. This study shows that the hypothyroid condition will cause an overall higher average blood glucose than normal. Insulin resistance appears when thyroid levels are too low or too high. [2] Correcting the hypothyroid state is beneficial, but replacement with too much thyroid hormone may result in continued insulin resistance. A low T3/T4 ratio was found in pre-diabetics who had both high insulin levels and insulin resistance. These subjects had lower T3 levels and higher T4 levels than normal, glucose-tolerant subjects. This study confirms that a certain level of T3 is essential for normal glucose metabolism.[3] SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin) is secreted by the liver and is positively correlated with thyroid levels—it rises when hyperthyroid and falls when hypothyroid. Low levels therefore suggest a hypothyroid condition. Low SHBG is also a biomarker of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and a risk factor for developing high blood sugar and type 2 diabetes, especially in women. [5] High T3 & High T4 may cause high blood sugar and insulin resistance Blood sugar problems may be caused by high thyroid levels. The following are so Continue reading >>

Many Diseases Linked To High Insulin The Longer Story

Many Diseases Linked To High Insulin The Longer Story

2 hour post-prandial blood glucose: 70 145 mg/dl Heres the big deal: The ratio of glucose to insulin should be less than 10:1. For example, if your blood sugar is 170 and your insulin is 8, then your ratio is 21 (NOT GOOD). You want the ratio to be less than 10:1. Heres another example, your blood glucose is 85 and your insulin is 6 then your ratio is 14. Its BETTER than 21, but more Chronically elevated insulin hormone has also been associated with Parkinsons disease, nerve pain, and autoimmune diseases like lupus and cancer.Yes, cancer!Breast cancer and pancreatic cancer are connected to high insulin.And according to an August 2009 study published in The Journal of The National Cancer Institute elevated insulin increases the risk for prostate cancer too. Heres their conclusion: Elevated fasting levels of serum insulin (but not glucose) appear to be associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer. Thats straight out of the National Cancer Institutes own journal. By now you may be wondering, how does one reduce insulin?The simplest way is free and totally up to you.Lose weight!Exercising helps you to reduce blood glucose levels.Even better, exercising makes your cells happy to see insulin, which improves insulin sensitivity. Now, Im going to say the unthinkable to many of you reading this.Eat a vegan diet, including more raw foods for just 30 days and see what glorious things take place.Caloric restriction and the consumption of nourishing foods (rather than soda, fast food and candy bars) can reduce insulin and pain-causing chemicals. Its really not as hard as it sounds, and maybe a healthy diet is the solution for you, considering the current path youre facing. With dietary compliance, your doctor may be able to discontinue some of your medications. Certain suppleme Continue reading >>

The One Test Your Doctor Isn’t Doing That Could Save Your Life

The One Test Your Doctor Isn’t Doing That Could Save Your Life

Insulin resistance doesn’t happen overnight. When most of your diet includes empty calories and an abundance of quickly absorbed sugars, liquid calories, and carbohydrates like bread, pasta, rice, and potatoes, your cells slowly become resistant to the effects of insulin. Your body increasingly demands more insulin to do the same job of keeping your blood sugar even. Eventually your cells become resistant to insulin’s call, resulting in insulin resistance. The higher your insulin levels are, the worse your insulin resistance. Your body starts to age and deteriorate. In fact, insulin resistance is the single most important phenomenon that leads to rapid, premature aging and all its resultant diseases, including heart disease, stroke, dementia, and cancer. Insulin resistance and the resulting metabolic syndrome often comes accompanied by increasing central obesity, fatigue after meals, sugar cravings, high triglycerides, low HDL, high blood pressure, problems with blood clotting, as well as increased inflammation. Even without these warning signs, one test can determine high insulin levels years or even decades before diabetes develops. Early detection can help you reverse these symptoms, yet doctors rarely use this crucial test that can detect high insulin levels. Why Doctors Miss the Initial Warning Sign of Insulin Resistance Doctors have been trained to measure a person’s fasting blood sugar, or the glucose levels present in your blood, at least eight hours after your last meal. Most don’t express concern until results show blood sugar levels reaching 110 mg/dl. That’s when they start “watching it.” Then, once your blood sugar reaches 126 mg/dl, your doctor will diagnose you with diabetes and put you on medication. The important thing to note is that bloo Continue reading >>

"it Isn't Possible To Be Insulin Resistant And Have A 5.2% A1c." - My Doctor

"It isn't possible to be insulin resistant and have a 5.2% A1C." - my doctor "It isn't possible to be insulin resistant and have a 5.2% A1C." - my doctor Hello, everyone. I just registered here and this is my first post. I have spent some weeks now researching what is going on with my body and I believe that I am becoming insulin resistant and that I sometimes experience reactive hypoglycemia. At first I was scared that it was diabetes so I went to the doctor and had a bunch of tests run. I had my blood (not anemic), urine, thyroid, etc checked. Thyroid is normal, urine is normal, and A1C is 5.2%. I had a venous blood sample taken to test for serum glucose and it was 107 mg/dl, and that was 3-4 hours after eating a bowl of cereal. I told the doc I was experiencing the following symptoms: Short-term and long-term memory dysfunction Slow healing of bruises/wounds/cuts/nicks/scrapes/etc Crashing after physical activity (10+ minutes cardio) Irritability, poor mood and crashing after eating high amounts of sugary foods Itching all over my body and especially nose, vaginal and anal areas Bloating, water retention, and increased flatulence In the past two years, gained more fat in my abdomen Blurred vision/decreased vision in past 3-4 years Yellow color on my skin in armpit area and inner thigh area (very likely acanthosis nigricans) New hair growth in inappropriate areas such as chin and areas near but outside of pubic region (within a 5 inch radius of the pubic region). When I came in for my follow-up visit to go over my labs, the doc promptly assured me that I was not a diabetic and therefore everything was great and I was good to go with a clean bill of health. When I asked her why I was experiencing episodes of hypoglycemia she had no answer. When I suggested to her that Continue reading >>

“can You Have A Normal Blood Sugar And Still Be Insulin Resistant?”

“can You Have A Normal Blood Sugar And Still Be Insulin Resistant?”

Why does my blood sugar rise when fasting? Can you have a normal blood sugar and still be insulin resistant? And can resistant starch be eaten on a keto or low-carb diet? It’s time for this week’s Q&A about intermittent fasting and low carb with Dr. Jason Fung: Why does my blood sugar rise when fasting? When fasting, I notice my blood sugar rises instead of dropping. Why is this and how do I correct it? James It’s due to the counter-regulatory surge. Normally, as insulin falls, other hormones go up. As these run counter to insulin, they are called the ‘counter-regulatory’ hormones. These include activation of the sympathetic nervous system, noradrenalin and growth hormone. The normal purpose of these hormones is to increase blood glucose. During fasting, insulin drops and these hormones go up, so blood glucose may go up instead of down. Is this a bad thing? No. Not at all. After all, if you are fasting, where did this glucose come from? It could only have come from one place – your own body stores. So your body is liberating this stored glucose for you to burn during fasting. A completely normal phenomenon. See posts on the Dawn Phenomenon for explanation. Dr. Jason Fung Can you have normal blood sugar and still be insulin resistant? Hello Dr. Fung, Can one have normal HbA1c and be insulin resistant? Thank you, Hana Yes. There are many different manifestations of insulin resistance, only one of which is elevated HbA1c. I prefer to call these manifestations of ‘hyperinsulinemia’ instead of insulin resistance. Hyperinsulinemia causes all of the facets of the metabolic syndrome including high blood pressure, high triglycerides and low HDL, increased abdominal obesity and high blood glucose (which can be measured by elevated A1C). Sometimes hyperinsulinemia Continue reading >>

What Tests Should I Get For Insulin Resistance And Pcos?

What Tests Should I Get For Insulin Resistance And Pcos?

Is Insulin Resistance Causing Your PCOS? Insulin resistance and PCOS commonly occur together. Have you got PCOS, but never been tested for insulin resistance? Or maybe you have been tested, but your doctor has told you that your blood sugar is normal? If so, you may have been left wondering what’s causing your PCOS. During my second year at university we did an experiment where were measured our blood glucose levels after eating different foods. We’d just been learning about how blood glucose could be lower in athletes due to higher muscle mass and increased insulin sensitivity. At the time, I was training for 20 hours a week. You can imagine my shock when I found that my results were close to the top end of the normal range. However, when I queried my doctor about this she assured me that it was still within the normal range. She told me that I needn’t be worried. I’m going to explain to you why this is incorrect and why even slight changes in blood glucose can be a sign of insulin resistance. Studies have shown that up to 70% of women with PCOS have insulin resistance. I’m always amazed at the number of women I talk to who have been diagnosed with PCOS, but not tested for insulin resistance. You were not born with PCOS. PCOS is a condition that develops due to your environment interacting with your genes. Your ‘environment’ includes what you eat, how much you exercise, stress levels, environmental toxins, etc. It’s therefore easy to see that there is always something in your environment causing your PCOS. If you can find out what this is then you can remove it, then reverse your PCOS symptoms. I’ve written about the main causes of PCOS and how insulin resistance is the main one. Now I want to further explore insulin resistance: – What is it? – Ho Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance: What You Need To Know

Insulin Resistance: What You Need To Know

Measuring insulin resistance might be the key to stopping prediabetes from becoming Type 2 diabetes. If you ask the average person on the street to play a word association game with diabetes, the word “fat” will come up sooner rather than later. Links between obesity and Type 2 diabetes are well established. And yet, not all fat people have diabetes, and not all people with diabetes are fat. Like many things connected to diabetes, simple and ubiquitous explanations almost never work. According to the U.S. Center for Disease Control, 100 million Americans are now obese, with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or higher. At the same time, the CDC reports that as many as 80 million Americans were insulin-resistant, and since insulin resistance is a precursor to diabetes onset, the two numbers seem to support one another. The correlation breaks down, however, if one assumes that obesity and insulin resistance are always connected. They aren’t; some 12% of those who are insulin-resistant are thin. Since testing only overweight people isn’t a diagnostic solution, heading off diabetes Armageddon in the future boils down to identifying insulin-resistant people, regardless of weight, say diabetes researchers. Early identification of insulin resistance can have a major impact on the long-term prognosis of diabetes in patients, or help patients avoid the onset of diabetes altogether, but the window for early diagnosis of insulin resistance often is missed. Standard tests such as A1c percentages or fasting glucose won’t always identify the problem in time to allow prevention to work. sponsor How Insulin Resistance Begins Insulin resistance is a metabolic condition that causes the body’s cells to require a higher than normal amount of insulin to convert glucose into energy. B Continue reading >>

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