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Help With Insulin Costs

Diabetes Assistance Programs

Diabetes Assistance Programs

Diabetes can be expensive and many people with it need help paying some of the bills. Having an insurance plan in place would be ideal but is not the case for everyone. If you lack health care coverage, many drug companies provide healthcare assistance if you meet specific requirements. Below is a list of sites that can help you get specific assistance. For the pharmaceutical sites, determine who manufactures the drug you need and contact them to see what assistance they can provide. The Partnership for Prescription Assistance helps qualifying patients without prescription drug coverage get the medicines they need for free or nearly free. RXassist offers a comprehensive database of patient assistance programs, as well as practical tools, news, and articles so that health care professionals and patients can find the information they need. CR3 Diabetes mission is to make a difference in the lives of people living with diabetes all over the world by providing equipment and encouragement to those in need. Insulin Pumpers Foundation is pleased to offer a program that helps bring insulin pump technology to those in our society who do not have the financial resources to purchase an insulin pump on their own. Medtronic Diabetes has a financial assistance program for current users of their pumps. Continue reading >>

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

How costly is diabetes management and treatment? Diabetes management and treatment is expensive. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the average cost of health care for a person with diabetes is $13,741 a year—more than twice the cost of health care for a person without diabetes.1 Many people who have diabetes need help paying for their care. For those who qualify, a variety of government and nongovernment programs can help cover health care expenses. This publication is meant to help people with diabetes and their family members find and access such resources. 1American Diabetes Association. Economic costs of diabetes in the U.S. in 2012. Diabetes Care. 2013;36(4):1033–1046. What is health insurance? Health insurance helps pay for medical care, including the cost of diabetes care. Health insurance options include the following: private health insurance, which includes group and individual health insurance government health insurance, such as Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), TRICARE, and veterans’ health care programs Starting in 2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) prevents insurers from denying coverage or charging higher premiums to people with preexisting conditions, such as diabetes. The ACA also requires most people to have health insurance or pay a fee. Some people may be exempt from this fee. Read more about the ACA at HealthCare.gov or call 1–800–318–2596, TTY 1–855–889–4325. Key Terms Some terms listed here have many meanings; only those meanings that relate to the financial and medical aspects of diabetes and its management and treatment are included. affiliation period: a period of time that must pass before health insurance coverage provided by a health maintenance organization (HMO) be Continue reading >>

Getting Financial Help For Diabetes

Getting Financial Help For Diabetes

By the dLife Editors No matter whom you ask—patients, caregivers, medical professionals, insurers, even employers—diabetes is expensive. In 2013, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) released the results of their five-year cost analysis, which showed that people with diabetes spend an average of $13,700 per year on healthcare-related expenses. The Health Care Cost Institute examined the spending of people under the age of sixty-five who were covered by employer-sponsored insurance from 2009 to 2013. They found that expenses were even higher, at approximately $15,000 per person. And when you look at the impact on the workforce, lost productivity and wages send these costs into the billions. It’s estimated that people with diabetes have healthcare costs totaling almost three times that of people without diagnosed diabetes. It’s no wonder that many need financial help. If you are one of them, there are a number of financial resources to tap into. Here are some quick ideas to get you started. Look for an insurance plan that covers as many diabetes-related expenses as possible. Check out the governmental and nongovernmental programs—both federal and local—to see where you qualify. Visit this government site to see what benefits you qualify for: Contact your primary care provider as well as the makers of any medications you use to find out if assistance programs are available. Dial 2-1-1, a free and confidential services that helps people find the local resources they need. Contact a medical social worker—typically found in a hospital—to discuss your options. Want to know more? Let’s look closer at your options. GENERAL Health Insurance Because health insurance is meant to cover unexpected future illnesses, diabetes that has already been diagnosed present Continue reading >>

Help With Your Diabetes Prescription And Insulin Costs

Help With Your Diabetes Prescription And Insulin Costs

5-minute read “I honestly think I got the most help from calling the manufacturer’s assistance programs. They have a really good grip on how their products are covered, and they gave me great advice on how to lower my costs.”T1D patient, WY Nonprofit Patient Assistance Programs for Type 1 Diabetes There are a number of patient and insulin assistance programs available to help with the costs of your medication, many of them run by nonprofit organizations. They include the following: Partnership for Prescription Assistance is a program sponsored by pharmaceutical companies, doctors, patient advocacy organizations and civic groups that helps low-income, uninsured patients get free or low-cost brand-name medications. NeedyMeds is a nonprofit organization that maintains an extensive database of patient assistance programs, state assistance, medication discount programs and free or low-cost medical care. You can search its database for free. The site also has information on thousands of programs to help consumers through the application process. RxAssist is an online database of pharmaceutical company programs that provide free or affordable medicines and co-pay assistance. RxHope is a web-based resource where you can search by medication to locate assistance programs. It also offers help with the application process. RxOutreach is a nonprofit mail-order pharmacy for uninsured or underinsured people. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) also has a publication called “Financial Help for Diabetes Care,” which offers information about resources that may help with medical expenses of a person with diabetes. You can view this publication online or order copies from the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse at 1-800-860-8747. Continue reading >>

Comparing Patient Assistance Programs For Insulin Medication

Comparing Patient Assistance Programs For Insulin Medication

Managing diabetes care can require a lifetime commitment. Beyond diet changes and exercise, many people with diabetes need to take insulin to help control their blood sugar. Daily doses of insulin can add up, and some people can’t cover the costs on their own. Fortunately, certain programs can help cover this expense. A patient assistance program (PAP) is a money saving program often backed by drug companies, nonprofits, and medical institutions. Most PAPs provide low- or no-cost insulin medication and supplies. Each PAP has different requirements and criteria for their programs. If you don’t meet the criteria for one program, don’t assume you won’t meet the criteria for another. The time you spend filling out applications may result in a big cost savings. Not everyone will qualify. A PAP may not cover the particular insulin you use. However, if you use insulin and need financial assistance, these websites and organizations are a great place to begin your search. Partnership for Prescription Assistance Applying for hundreds of PAPs can be time-consuming. But the Partnership for Prescription Assistance (PPA) may help you save time. You can apply for hundreds of private and public assistance programs at once through PPA, rather than applying to each individual company. PPA is designed to assist people who don’t have any prescription drug coverage. You may not qualify for any plans if you have pharmacy or prescription insurance. Process steps: Receive an initial eligibility status by filling out a simple questionnaire on the PPA website. Enter the name of the medicine you’re taking, your age, where you live, and if you qualify for any insurance coverage. PPA will supply you with a list of potential assistance programs. RxAssist RxAssist hosts a large database o Continue reading >>

Insulin Is Too Expensive For Many Of My Patients. It Doesn't Have To Be.

Insulin Is Too Expensive For Many Of My Patients. It Doesn't Have To Be.

At age 15, I developed an unquenchable thirst and frequent urination, and lost 20 pounds. I had developed Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease that destroyed my body's ability to produce insulin. Without insulin, I would have eventually developed a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis, which is lethal without (and even sometimes with) treatment. Years later, I'm a practicing endocrinologist. I could never have imagined back when I first started taking insulin that one day I would have so many patients who could not afford the medication because of skyrocketing prices. When the drug was discovered in 1921, the original patent was sold to the University of Toronto for $1 so that no one else could patent it and "secure a profitable monopoly." Numerous improvements later, insulin is produced by a three-company oligopoly. When the first of the newer insulin "analogs," Humalog, hit the market in 1996, it sold for $21 a vial. Today, vials of analog insulins, including Humalog, sell for about $300. Patients with Type 1 diabetes typically require two or three vials of insulin per month, but patients who are more resistant to insulin, such as those with Type 2 diabetes, may require six or more. A recent paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that insulin nearly tripled in cost from 2002 to 2013. A lawsuit filed in January accuses insulin companies of price collusion for allegedly raising prices repeatedly and in lockstep to match their competitors. Prices have gotten so bad that the American Diabetes Association recently launched an online petition at MakeInsulinAffordable.org, which has been signed by more than 248,000 people. Because insulin is so expensive, some people take less than their prescribed dose, causing higher blood sugars, which may lead Continue reading >>

Patient Assistance Program

Patient Assistance Program

Even though NovoLog® is covered by most health insurance and Medicare plans,a we know that sometimes things can get in the way of filling your prescription: Having a hard time getting the prescription coverage you need Money issues that make it difficult to pay for your insulin If you have questions about insurance reimbursement for NovoLog®, you can contact our call center at 1-866-310-7549. Please have your insurance information with you when you call. This includes your managed care plan name and your group number, which should be on your insurance card. If you can’t afford the cost of your insulin, we may be able to help. Making our products available to people who need them but cannot afford them is part of Novo Nordisk's commitment to helping people with diabetes. Anyone with diabetes who meets the eligibility requirements for the Patient Assistance Program (PAP) can receive NovoLog®, or any other Novo Nordisk product free of charge as long as they stay eligible. aFormulary data are provided by Fingertip Formulary® and are current as of January 2015. Because formularies do change and many health plans offer more than one formulary, please check directly with the health plan to confirm coverage. Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

For diabetic patients who need financial assistance with supplies and related health care items and services, the following programs may be of help. Please note that applications must be submitted to the programs and not to PPA® . Categories Insulin Access Programs Blink Health is working with Eli Lilly and Company to offer a 40 percent discount on Lilly insulins. The Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program delivers the 40 percent discount directly to patients and will be honored at over 67,000 local pharmacies nationwide. Anyone can participate in the Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program via the Blink Health mobile app (available for iOS & Android) or website, www.blinkhealth.com, which has no membership fees or monthly premiums. Patients enter the form, dosage and quantity of the Lilly insulin that matches their prescription. The discount will be automatically applied. Payments are made online and the prescriptions can be picked up at virtually any U.S. pharmacy, including: Walgreens, CVS/pharmacy, Target, RiteAid, Safeway and Kroger. People using federal government programs are not eligible. Purchases are fully refundable. Assistance: Insulin Free Glucose Meters Abbott Diabetes Care provides free blood glucose monitoring system kits to those with diabetes. Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 USA Tel: 888-522-5226 Fax: 202-337-8314 Email: [email protected] Assistance: Free Glucose Meters Test Strips Roche Diagnostics, the maker of ACCU-CHEK® Products provides a limited supply of ACCU-CHEK Aviva test strips to a network of community clinics and health centers throughout the U.S. to distribute to their low-income and uninsured patients with diabetes. Roache Diagnostics Corporation 9115 Hague Road Indianapolis, IN 46250 Phone: 800 Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Insulin Prescription Assistance

Diabetes & Insulin Prescription Assistance

If you or your loved one are one of the millions of Americans living with a chronic disease like diabetes while struggling to pay for costly insulin and assorted medications—you’re not alone. Simplefill Prescription Assistance can provide valuable diabetes help by assisting with Lantus, Humalog or Novolog and additional types of insulin. We help hundreds of diabetes patients receive the diabetes insulin assistance they need so they can focus on living well. We also advocate on our patients’ behalf through grant services, communicating with doctors, filling prescriptions, and keeping up to date on the changes to Medicare and Medicaid. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is split into different types: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, typically called juvenile diabetes, effects mostly children and young adults. As you eat, your pancreas breaks down the sugar and starches in food and converts them into energy with the help of a hormone called insulin. Everything we do requires energy—from waking up in the morning to brushing our teeth to even just simply blinking. In type 1 diabetes patients, their bodies don’t produce insulin. In order to live healthfully, type 1 diabetes patients must take insulin to give their pancreas the hormone it needs to break down food properly. Through insulin injections, exercise and a balanced diet, type 1 diabetes patients can live long, full lives. In type 2 diabetes patients, insulin is produced, but patients’ bodies cannot keep up with the demand. The excess sugar, instead of being converted into energy, becomes free floating in the blood stream. There are numerous causes for this including genetics, weight, cell communication problems and more. Part of managing type 2 diabetes for most patients involves much of the same recom Continue reading >>

The Risky Game One Doctor Plays To Help Patients Find Affordable Insulin05:37 Download X Copy The Code Below To Embed The Wbur Audio Player On Your Site Copy Embed Code

The Risky Game One Doctor Plays To Help Patients Find Affordable Insulin05:37 Download X Copy The Code Below To Embed The Wbur Audio Player On Your Site Copy Embed Code

In all, it takes three appointments with Dr. Hayward Zwerling, left, two trips to the pharmacy and several emails and phone calls to try to get Larry Rose affordable insulin. (Jesse Costa/WBUR) Sign up for the CommonHealth newsletter to receive a weekly digest of WBURs best health, medicine and science coverage. When Larry Rose filled his prescription for Lantus last year, and his copay came in at $400,he knew something had to change. Just three months earlier, a 90-day supply of the popular insulin brand had only cost him $15. Rose hurried in to see his doctor for what he hoped would be an affordable substitute. "And he said, 'Yep, I'm used to this. I can't get you a cost. We're going to have to play a game,' " Rose says, recounting the conversation. That game turned into an exercise in futility for Rose and his doctor, one many patients will relate to as the price of insulin and other drugs soar. Doctors write prescriptions. Patients take them to a pharmacy. Some leave without their medication when they learn the cost. Diabetes and other ailments left untreated get worse. Patients return to their doctor and the cycle starts again. "If I can't have the conversation, if I can't know the costs in real time, in the exam room, I'm at loss," says Rose's physician, Dr. Hayward Zwerling. "I can't make a final decision." When Rose arrived, looking for help, there were three or four brands of insulin-- long- and short-acting, in different doses and applicators-- that Zwerling could prescribe. "The problem was, I had no way of knowing which one was affordable," Zwerling says. There are several websites that list the cash prices for insulin and hundreds of other drugs. But most of Zwerling's patients have health insurance, and each health plan varies. When Zwerling meets with pa Continue reading >>

Insulin Assistance Programs

Insulin Assistance Programs

We are grateful to be insured and to have access to affordable insulin. If you are uninsured, underinsured or struggling to pay for insulin, there are programs that can help. From Eli Lilly If you have no insurance, Medicare Part D, or are underuninsured, and would like more facts about Lilly’s patient assistance programs – More info on their website. From Novo Nordisk The Novo Nordisk Patient Assistance Program (PAP) is our continued commitment to people living with diabetes and the Novo Nordisk Triple Bottom Line. The Diabetes PAP provides free medicine to those who qualify. If approved, a free 120-day supply of medicine will be sent to the prescribing health care providers’ office to be picked up at the patient’s convenience. Novo Nordisk will automatically contact the health care provider prior to your next refill to approve the medication reorder. More info on their website. From Sanofi Our passion is to improve access to medicines and healthcare. Patients are our number one priority, and to meet their needs more efficiently, Sanofi US offers an integrated patient support program titled Sanofi Patient Connection (SPC). More info on their website. If you have more or different links please contact me and I will add them to this list. Thank you! Further reading on insulin: Photo Credit: Scott Benner What is Type 2 Diabetes? The Basics Life with Type 2 Diabetes: Emotions & Mental Health: Family, Friends & Relationships Holidays Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

How Do I Get Help With Insulin Costs? $750 Co-pay!

How Do I Get Help With Insulin Costs? $750 Co-pay!

How do I get help with insulin costs? $750 co-pay! How do I get help with insulin costs? $750 co-pay! I am Type 2 Diabetic. I have been on Medicare for almost a year now. I am also receiving Social Security Disability as my only source of income. My back is bad and I have other health issues related to and not related to Diabetes. My old doctor retired and closed his small town practice. I formerly received my insulins from the Sanofi and Lilly Patient Assistance programs. I now receive monthly Social Security Disability as I said. The problem is that I make too much money to still be eligible for the patient assistance programs and am on Medicare. My new doctor wrote new prescriptions for both Humalog and Lantus. The prescriptions are to be filled by Humana's mail order pharmacy Right Source. I spoke to them today and was told that my co-pay for a 3 month supply of both Lantus and Humalog would be $750.00. There is no possible way that I could ever afford that. A co-pay of $750.00 would be more than half of the disability check I receive each month! What can I do? Is there any help available in getting the vital insulin that I need? I have been in a clinical study in the past. I would do that again immediately if I qualified for a study. Because I take Humalog, I am not eligible for many of the studies. Other Diabetes studies I have tried to get into say I am not eligible for other reasons. I wish that was an option but it is not at this time. Any information that you could provide in assisting me getting the insulins I desperately need would be greatly appreciated. Continue reading >>

How Can I Pay For Diabetes Medications And Care?

How Can I Pay For Diabetes Medications And Care?

A run-down on insurance and other payment assistance programs for medical services and prescription medicines By Ava Runge and Lynn Kennedy This article is part of a series focused on helping people with diabetes navigate health insurance in the United States. What should we write about in our next segment? Email [email protected] with insurance questions you would like us to address! Navigating the complex insurance world can be frustrating and overwhelming, particularly for people with diabetes who interact with the healthcare system often. For this segment, diaTribe answers a commonly asked question from our readers: How Can I Pay for Diabetes Medications and Care? A background section with additional information on understanding health insurance can be found at the bottom. How Can I Pay for Diabetes Medications and Care? The primary way to pay for healthcare supplies and services is through health insurance, which can be obtained independently, through an employer, or from the government (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid, and VA). Covered services and supplies – as well as the type of cost sharing between the insurer and the person insured – can differ considerably from plan to plan (click here for more on different types of health insurance options and here for information on decoding insurance language). While health insurance typically won’t cover 100% of medical expenses, it can go a long way in making treatment accessible. However, co-pays and premiums can add up quickly and make care difficult to afford. This is especially true for people with diabetes, who tend to use healthcare services frequently and often use multiple devices and medications to manage their diabetes. The good news is that where insurance doesn’t cover health expenses, there are many oth Continue reading >>

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