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Health Care Costs Diabetes Canada

Large Canadian Study Finds Health Care Cost Of People Living With Diabetes More Than Double That Of People Without The Disease | Dalla Lana School Of Public Health

Large Canadian Study Finds Health Care Cost Of People Living With Diabetes More Than Double That Of People Without The Disease | Dalla Lana School Of Public Health

Large Canadian study finds health care cost of people living with diabetes more than double that of people without the disease Large Canadian study finds health care cost of people living with diabetes more than double that of people without the disease Each person living with diabetes requires care that costs the Canadian health care system an average of $16,000 over eight years, compared to $6,000 in average health care costs for people who dont live with diabetes, a new study has found. The study is the most comprehensive Canadian analysis of health care costs related to diabetes to date, with a sample size of almost three million people. Researchers at the University of Torontos Dalla Lana School of Public Health using data from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) found that the average per-person health care spending for diabetes cases was more than twice that of non-diabetes controls and results in billions of dollars of health care related costs annually. Over the eight-year study, females living with diabetes cost the system $9,731 more than a non-diabetic female and males cost $10,315 more. Roughly $4,000 of these costs related to diabetes were incurred in the first year after diagnosis. Diabetes is one of the greatest public health and health system challenges of the 21st century because its among the most costly health conditions to manage, said Laura Rosella, lead author, Assistant Professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health , adjunct scientist at ICES and scientist at Public Health Ontario. Rosella noted Canadian cost estimates directly attributable to diabetes were limited before this study. The study, Impact of diabetes on health care costs in a population-based cohort: a cost analysis published in Diabetic Medicine , was funded Continue reading >>

Lower-cost Canadian Health Care As Good As U.s.s For Low-income Kids With Diabetes

Lower-cost Canadian Health Care As Good As U.s.s For Low-income Kids With Diabetes

Join us in radically transforming health worldwide. Whether you give your time, your money, or your voice, your support spurs us to be unconventional, creative, and global in ambition. Home > UCSF News Center > Lower-Cost Canadian Health Care as Good as U.S.s for Low-Income Kids with Diabetes Lower-Cost Canadian Health Care as Good as U.S.s for Low-Income Kids with Diabetes Generalists in Ontario as Effective as Higher-Trained Specialists in California, UCSF-led Study Shows Low-income children with Type 1 diabetes in Ontario, Canada, whose disease is managed by family physicians and pediatricians fared at least as well as low-income children in California, who are more likely to be cared for by highly specialized pediatric endocrinologists with an additional three years training. In a study led by Sunitha Kaiser , MD, of UCSF Benioff Childrens Hospital San Francisco, researchers tracked the outcomes of nearly 7,000 children approximately 4,900 in California and 2,000 in Ontario whose ages ranged from 1 to 17, from 2009 to 2012. Some 64 percent of the California children were cared for by a pediatric endocrinologist, compared with 27 percent of the Ontario patients, according to the study, which was published Dec. 8, 2016,in CMAJ Open . Health care in Ontario is free for all legal residents, including the low-income children in the study. The California children in the study were enrolled in the federally funded California Childrens Services program, which serves low-income families with chronic diseases. The researchers found that the rate of hospitalizations due to complications of the disease, while clinically comparable, was slightly higher for the California children: 0.08 hospitalizations for each male-patient year in California, versus 0.06 in Ontario; and 0.11 v Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Diabetes In Canada Over 10 Years: Applying Attributable Health Care Costs To A Diabetes Incidence Prediction Model

The Cost Of Diabetes In Canada Over 10 Years: Applying Attributable Health Care Costs To A Diabetes Incidence Prediction Model

Go to: Methods Diabetes risk and incidence To estimate the predicted risk and number of new diabetes cases within the next 10 years, we used the Diabetes Population Risk Tool version 2.0. DPoRT 2.0 is an updated iteration of DPoRT, a predictive algorithm developed to calculate future population risk and incidence of physician- diagnosed diabetes in those aged 20 years and over. DPoRT was derived using national survey data individually linked to a chart-validated diabetes registry. This cohort was then used to create sex-specific survival models using baseline risk factors from the survey for diabetes incidence. Specifically, we assessed the probability of physician-diagnosed diabetes from the interview date until censoring for death or end of follow-up. The model was developed in the Ontario cohort and predictions from the model were validated against actual observed diabetes incidence in two external cohorts in Ontario and Manitoba. Variables used within its two sex-specific models include a combination of hypertension, ethnicity, education, immigrant status, body mass index, smoking status, heart disease and income. Full details on the model specification and validation can be found elsewhere. 7 The regression model can run on nationally available population health surveys and has been updated (DPoRT 2.0) and used to established prevention targets for diabetes.8 For this study, we used DPoRT 2.0 to generate incidence predictions based on the recent 2011 and 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). The CCHS collects information on the demographics, health status and determinants of health of the Canadian population. It is a nationally representative survey that uses a crosssectional study design and is administered on an ongoing basis, with annual data reporting. Continue reading >>

Health-care Costs More Than Double For Canadians With Diabetes: Study

Health-care Costs More Than Double For Canadians With Diabetes: Study

The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. A new study has determined that the average cost of health care for Canadians with diabetes is $16,000 over eight years, compared to $6,000 for those without the disease. The analysis published in the journal Diabetic Medicine shows that caring for the 3.4 million Canadians with diabetes costs the health system billions of dollars each year. Lead author Laura Rosella of the University of Toronto says diabetes is one of the biggest public health challenges of the 21st century because of how much it costs to manage. The study captured health care costs for almost three million people with diabetes from 2004 to 2012 using patient data that included hospitalizations, emergency room visits, surgery, kidney dialysis and medications. Rosella says the prevalence of diabetes is expected to rise as a result of the aging population, as well as increasing rates of obesity and sedentary lifestyles. She says it's critical that diabetes-related costs be estimated in order to properly allocate future health care resources and to determine cost-savings from prevention strategies. Dr. Janet Hux, chief science officer at the Canadian Diabetes Association, says the disease decreases a person's quality and length of life. "This study documents the heavy and potentially unsustainable burden the condition poses to the health care system," she says. Continue reading >>

Tandem Diabetes Care Applies For Health Canada Medical Device License

Tandem Diabetes Care Applies For Health Canada Medical Device License

Tandem Diabetes Care Applies for Health Canada Medical Device License Commercial launch of the t:slim X2 Insulin Pump in (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the only touchscreen insulin pumps, today announced its submission of a medical device license application to to market its t:slim X2 Insulin Pump with Dexcom G5 Mobile continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) integration1. The Company plans to launch the pump in in the second half of 2018, subject to regulatory approvals. "This application is another important step toward achieving our strategic goal of bringing the benefits of the t:slim X2 Insulin Pump to people outside of . "When available, the t:slim X2 will provide people in a competitive choice in the durable insulin pump market, which we believe will be of particular interest as the only pump with Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM integration." The Company anticipates that the t:slim X2 Insulin Pump offered in will be capable of displaying both English and French, offer a 24-hour clock, and will display glucose readings in millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Canadian residents interested in signing up for email updates on Tandem's plans in can visit www.tandemdiabetes.com/canada . The simple-to-use t:slim X2 Insulin Pump includes advanced features like a large color touchscreen, Bluetooth radio, rechargeable battery, USB connectivity and watertight construction (IPX7)2. It is the only pump that integrates with Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM, the first CGM-enabled pump approved in to let users make treatment decisions without pricking their finger.3 The t:slim X2 Pump is up to 38% smaller than other insulin pumps and holds up to 300 units of insulin.4 According to Diabetes Canada ( www.diabetes.ca ), there are more than 3.4 million people with diabetes in the countr Continue reading >>

The Most Costly Places In Canada For Patients To Have Diabetes

The Most Costly Places In Canada For Patients To Have Diabetes

The Personal Health Navigator is available to all Canadian patients. Questions about your doctor, hospital or how to navigate the health care system can be sent to [email protected] The Question: What are the best and worst places to have diabetes in Canada, based on the cost of needles and other supplies? The Answer: This question came via twitter from a patient, who rightly pointed out that health care in Canada isn’t always fully covered, especially when it comes to having a chronic condition such as diabetes. Out-of-pocket costs for patients with Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, were lowest per year for those living in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories, where it is fully covered. In the Yukon, there is a $250 deductible, then full coverage. The next lowest provinces are Quebec ($1,546.58) and Saskatchewan ($1,870.50). The highest costs were encountered in New Brunswick ($3,426.99), Newfoundland and Labrador ($3,396.04) and Prince Edward Island ($3036.31). Ontario ($2,073.50) was considered a middle performer. That compares to the Canadian average ($1,824.97), according to June 2011 data provided by the Canadian Diabetes Association. Those figures are based on payments made by those with an annual individual income of $30,000. In many cases, the out-of-pocket increases for those with the higher incomes of $43,000 and $75,000, save for the Yukon, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador, where the amounts are the same, no matter the income. The amounts are based on case studies and include the cost for medications, devices, test strips for glucometers and other supplies – items that are not typically covered on public health plans. Though the Canadian Diabetes Association’s method on tracking costs is limited – it cannot be gene Continue reading >>

Large Canadian Study Finds Health Care Cost Of People Living With Diabetes More Than Double That Of People Without The Disease

Large Canadian Study Finds Health Care Cost Of People Living With Diabetes More Than Double That Of People Without The Disease

Large Canadian study finds health care cost of people living with diabetes more than double that of people without the disease Each person living with diabetes requires care that costs the Canadian health care system an average of $16,000 over eight years, compared to $6,000 in average health care costs for people who dont live with diabetes, a new study has found. The study is the most comprehensive Canadian analysis of health care costs related to diabetes to date, with a sample size of almost three million people. Researchers at the University of Torontos Dalla Lana School of Public Health using data from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) found that the average per-person health care spending for diabetes cases was more than twice that of non-diabetes controls and results in billions of dollars of health care related costs annually. Over the eight-year study, females living with diabetes cost the system $9,731 more than a non-diabetic female and males cost $10,315 more. Roughly $4,000 of these costs related to diabetes were incurred in the first year after diagnosis. Diabetes is one of the greatest public health and health system challenges of the 21st century because its among the most costly health conditions to manage, said Laura Rosella , lead author, assistant professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, adjunct scientist at ICES and scientist at Public Health Ontario. Dr. Rosella noted Canadian cost estimates directly attributable to diabetes were limited before this study. The study, "Impact of diabetes on health care costs in a population-based cohort: a cost analysis" published in Diabetic Medicine, was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. It captured health care costs of almost three million people from 2004-201 Continue reading >>

New Canadian Diabetes Cost Model Paints A Sobering View Of Diabetes In Canada

New Canadian Diabetes Cost Model Paints A Sobering View Of Diabetes In Canada

New Canadian Diabetes Cost Model Paints a Sobering View of Diabetes in Canada OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - Dec. 7, 2009) - Editors Note: There is one video, one report, and one audio file associated with this Press Release. In a report released today, An Economic Tsunami: The Cost of Diabetes in Canada, the Canadian Diabetes Association has introduced an important new tool in the fight against diabetes in Canada: the Canadian Diabetes Cost Model. The Model details the dramatic increase in the prevalence and cost of diabetes in Canada, both of which have escalated sharply over the last decade and are expected to continue their rapid ascent for the foreseeable future. "For the first time, Canada has a Diabetes Cost Model specifically based on Canadian data to estimate both the current and future costs of diabetes," said Ellen Malcolmson, President and CEO of the Canadian Diabetes Association. "If left unchecked, the economic burden of diabetes in Canada could escalate to nearly $17 billion by 2020, an increase of more than $10 billion from 2000, and the number of Canadians diagnosed with diabetes will have nearly tripled. The results are a sobering reminder of the action required to reduce the burden of diabetes in Canada while improving the individual health for people living with the disease." The Model, designed for the Canadian Diabetes Association, is the first such model using Canadian data that can be utilized to determine the economic impact of diabetes on Canadian society, both now and in the future. The Model can:1 Project the costs, incidence and prevalence of the disease, as well as co-morbidities common among people with diabetes; Determine, where efficacy data exists, the financial cost benefit of initiatives designed to delay or prevent the onset of type Continue reading >>

General Diabetes Information

General Diabetes Information

What is Diabetes? Diabetes is the name given to disorders in which the body has trouble regulating its blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels. There are two major types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, a hormone that enables people to get energy from food. T1D usually strikes in childhood, adolescence, or young adulthood, and lasts a lifetime. Just to survive, people with T1D must take multiple injections of insulin daily or continually infuse insulin through a pump. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disorder in which a person’s body still produces insulin but is unable to use it effectively. T2D is usually diagnosed in adulthood and does not always require insulin injections. However, increased obesity has led to a recent rise in cases of T2D in children and young adults. Taking insulin does not cure any type of diabetes, nor does it prevent the possibility of the disease’s devastating effects, including: kidney failure, blindness, nerve damage, amputation, heart attack, stroke, and pregnancy complications. The Scope of Diabetes More than three million Canadians have diabetes: Diagnosed: Three million More than 300,000 Canadians are living with T1D.2 Diabetes currently affects 366 million people worldwide and is expected to affect 552 million by 2030.3 In Canada, more than 20 people are diagnosed with diabetes every hour of every day.4 The Cost of Diabetes Diabetes is consuming an ever-larger share of provincial and territorial health care budgets.1 With the aging of Canada's population, the total direct health care costs associated with diabetes is expected to increase to over $8 billion (CAD) annually by 2016.6 Canadians with diabetes incur medical expenses tha Continue reading >>

Medical Xpress: Health-care Cost Diabetics More Than Double That Of Those Without The Disease, Study Finds

Medical Xpress: Health-care Cost Diabetics More Than Double That Of Those Without The Disease, Study Finds

Health-care cost diabetics more than double that of those without the disease, study finds Each person living with diabetes requires care that costs the Canadian health-care system an average of $16,000 over eight years, compared to $6,000 in average health-care costs for people who don't live with diabetes, a new study has found. The study is the most comprehensive Canadian analysis of health-care costs related to diabetes to date, with a sample size of almost three million people. Researchers at the University of Toronto's Dalla Lana School of Public Health, using data from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), found that the average per-person health care spending for diabetes cases is more than twice that of non-diabetes controls and results in billions of dollars of health care related costs annually. Over the eight-year study, females living with diabetes cost the system $9,731 more than a non-diabetic female and males cost $10,315 more. Roughly $4,000 of these costs related to diabetes were incurred in the first year after diagnosis. "Diabetes is one of the greatest public health and health system challenges of the 21st century because it's among the most costly health conditions to manage," said Laura Rosella, lead author, assistant professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, adjunct scientist at ICES and scientist at Public Health Ontario. Rosella noted Canadian cost estimates directly attributable to diabetes were limited before this study. The study, "Impact of diabetes on health care costs in a population-based cohort: a cost analysis," was published in Diabetic Medicine and funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. It captured health-care costs of almost three million people from 2004-2012 using patient-specific health Continue reading >>

Diabetes Burden And Prevention

Diabetes Burden And Prevention

Diabetes Canada estimates that, as of 2015, 3.4 million Canadians (9.3% of the population) have type 2 diabetesa number they expect will increase by 2025, when a predicted 5 million Canadians (12.1% of the population) will suffer from the disease. The pervasiveness of diabetes is amplified by its side effects, including: cardiovascular complications, end-stage renal disease, and lower limb amputation are all corollary to untreated, debilitating diabetes. The already-widespread, but still growing prevalence of diabetes, and the variety of complications it incurs, demand a rigorous investigation into its social, cultural and environmental causes. Our team leads a number of research studies related to the health and economic burden of type 2 diabetes. To learn more about our work in this area, please see the following resources: Hillmer M., Sandoval G.A., Elliott J.A., Jain M., Barker T., Prisniak A., Astley S., Rosella L.C. Diabetes risk reduction in primary care: Evaluation of the Ontario Primary Care Diabetes Prevention Program. Canadian Journal of Public Health. 2017; 108(2): e176-e184. Available from: Zuk A., Quionez C., Lebenbaum M., Rosella L.C. The Association between Undiagnosed Glycemic Abnormalities and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors with Periodontitis: Results from 2007-2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey. Journal of Clinical Periodontology. In Press. 2017 Available at: . Campbell, T.K., Alberga, A., Rosella, L.C. The impact of access to health services on prediabetes awareness: A population-based study. Preventive Medicine. 2016; 93(7): 7-13. Available from: . Rosella L.C., Lebenbaum M., Fitzpatrick T., ORiley D., Wang J., Booth G.L., Stukel T.A., Wodchis W. Impact of diabetes on healthcare costs in a population-based cohort: A cost analysis. Diabetic Medicine Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care In The U.s. And Canada

Diabetes Care In The U.s. And Canada

Abstract OBJECTIVE—To compare the glycemic control of patients with type 1 diabetes treated in the U.S. and Canada. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A large multicenter randomized clinical trial conducted in the U.S. and Canada was analyzed. Patients with type 1 diabetes, screened from 1983 to 1989 for enrollment in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT), were categorized as treated in the U.S. (n = 2,604) or Canada (n = 245). HbA1c levels were compared between U.S. and Canadian patients, both before and after adjustment for predictors of HbA1c. RESULTS—In general, volunteers screened for the DCCT were highly educated and following healthy lifestyles. Canadians were somewhat younger (25 vs. 27 years of age, P = 0.002), less likely to be college educated (62 vs. 71%, P = 0.002), more likely to receive care through a family doctor (41 vs. 28%, P = 0.001), and had a higher frequency of out-patient visits (4 vs. 3 per year, P = 0.004). Despite these differences in health care delivery, the mean HbA1c at baseline was identical in the two countries (8.9 vs. 9.0, P = 0.40). Adjustment for demographic, lifestyle, and clinical predictors of HbA1c yielded similar findings (9.0 vs. 9.2, P = 0.15). Equal percentages of American and Canadian patients who were screened ultimately ent Continue reading >>

Impact Of Diabetes On Healthcare Costs In A Population-based Cohort: A Cost Analysis

Impact Of Diabetes On Healthcare Costs In A Population-based Cohort: A Cost Analysis

Abstract To estimate the healthcare costs attributable to diabetes in Ontario, Canada using a propensity-matched control design and health administrative data from the perspective of a single-payer healthcare system. Incident diabetes cases among adults in Ontario were identified from the Ontario Diabetes Database between 2004 and 2012 and matched 1:3 to control subjects without diabetes identified in health administrative databases on the basis of sociodemographics and propensity score. Using a comprehensive source of administrative databases, direct per-person costs (Canadian dollars 2012) were calculated. A cost analysis was performed to calculate the attributable costs of diabetes; i.e. the difference of costs between patients with diabetes and control subjects without diabetes. The study sample included 699 042 incident diabetes cases. The costs attributable to diabetes were greatest in the year after diagnosis [C$3,785 (95% CI 3708, 3862) per person for women and C$3,826 (95% CI 3751, 3901) for men], increasing substantially for older age groups and patients who died during follow-up. After accounting for baseline comorbidities, attributable costs were primarily incurred through inpatient acute hospitalizations, physician visits and prescription medications and assistive devices. The excess healthcare costs attributable to diabetes are substantial and pose a significant clinical and public health challenge. This burden is an important consideration for decision-makers, particularly given increasing concern over the sustainability of the healthcare system, aging population structure and increasing prevalence of diabetic risk factors, such as obesity. What's new? Using a validated, population-based registry, we created the largest propensity-matched cohort (almost 3 Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Diabetes

The Cost Of Diabetes

Individuals and families bear the cost of diabetes through medical expenses, inconvenience and deteriorating health. These personal burdens translate into significant costs for Canadian society as a whole. With the aging of Canada's population, the total direct health care costs associated with diabetes is expected to increase to over $8 billion annually by 2016 1 . The information you provide through this survey is collected under the authority of the Department of Employment and Social Development Act (DESDA) for the purpose of measuring the performance of Canada.ca and continually improving the website. Your participation is voluntary. Please do not include sensitive personal information in the message box, such as your name, address, Social Insurance Number, personal finances, medical or work history or any other information by which you or anyone else can be identified by your comments or views. Any personal information collected will be administered in accordance with the Department of Employment and Social Development Act , the Privacy Act and other applicable privacy laws governing the protection of personal information under the control of the Department of Employment and Social Development. Survey responses will not be attributed to individuals. If you wish to obtain information related to this survey, you may submit a request to the Department of Employment and Social Development pursuant to the Access to Information Act . Instructions for making a request are provided in the publication InfoSource , copies of which are located in local Service Canada Centres. You have the right to file a complaint with the Privacy Commissioner of Canada regarding the institutions handling of your personal information at: How to file a complaint . When making a request, plea Continue reading >>

Economic Tsunami: The Cost Of Diabetes In Canada

Economic Tsunami: The Cost Of Diabetes In Canada

Diabetes Canada released its Economic Tsunami, the Cost of Diabetes in Canada report in December 2009. The report introduced the Canadian Diabetes Cost Model, a tool developed by the Centre for Spatial Economics to identify current prevalence rates and financial costs for diabetes in Canada, and projected rates for 2020. Since then, through the generous support of an unrestricted educational grant provided by Novo Nordisk Canada Inc., Diabetes Canada has adapted the cost model to provide similar reporting for each Canadian province. National cost model report Provincial reports Continue reading >>

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