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Glargine Insulin Cost

Epipen Is Not Alone – Lantus And Other Insulin Top The Price Charts

Epipen Is Not Alone – Lantus And Other Insulin Top The Price Charts

The increase of EpiPen prices has dominated the media for the past two weeks, but there’s another pricey injectable lifesaving prescription drug that nobody is talking about and is used by millions of Americans every day – insulin. Insulin is a drug that is used every single day by most Type 1 diabetic Americans to help control the effects of diabetes. Insulin Price Increases According to a report from the Alliance of Community Health, between 2010 and 2015 the average price for six diabetic drugs, including four types of insulin, increased by over 160%. Over a decade earlier, in 2002, a patient could purchase insulin for $213 per month. In 2013, that same insulin cost $736 each month. According to Marissa Howell, a single mother of a daughter who has Type 1 Diabetes, the cost is actually around $850 every month for insulin, alone. This does not include other expenses associated with diabetes like diabetic testing supplies, pump supplies, alcohol wipes, glucagon, etc. “The cost of having Type 1 Diabetes is outrageous,” said Howell. “In the past, I have had to forego paying other bills so that I could afford to pay cash for prescriptions. Unfortunately, there’s not a ‘payment plan’ at pharmacies.” Help from Rx Advocacy Luckily, in the past year, she’s only had to pay $50/month for all of her daughter’s insulin. She joined a prescription assistance program called Rx Advocacy by LowestMed. She applied and was accepted within a month. It’s different than most prescription assistance programs, because there is no insurance or income limitation. You can have insurance and still qualify; you can have a high income and still qualify. The Rx Advocacy program is not limited to insulin prescription drugs, but can help with nearly all FDA-approved drugs, inc Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

Cost Comparison Of Insulin Glargine With Insulin Detemir In A Basal-bolus Regime With Mealtime Insulin Aspart In Type 2 Diabetes In Germany

Cost Comparison Of Insulin Glargine With Insulin Detemir In A Basal-bolus Regime With Mealtime Insulin Aspart In Type 2 Diabetes In Germany

Go to: Abstract Objective: To compare the treatment costs of insulin glargine (IG; Lantus®) to detemir (ID; Levemir®), both combined with bolus insulin aspart (NovoRapid®) in type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Germany. Methods: Cost comparison was based on data of a 1-year randomised controlled trial [1]. IG was administered once daily and ID once (57% of patients) or twice daily (43%) according to treatment response. At the end of the trial, mean daily basal insulin doses were 0.59 U/kg (IG) and 0.82 U/kg (ID). Aspart doses were 0.32 U/kg (IG) and 0.36 U/kg (ID). Costs were calculated from the German statutory health insurance (SHI) perspective using official 2008 prices. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test robustness of the results. Results: Annual basal and bolus insulin costs per patient were € 1,473 (IG) and € 1,940 (ID). The cost of lancets and blood glucose test strips were € 1,125 (IG) and € 1,286 (ID). Annual costs for needles were € 393 (IG) and € 449 (ID). The total annual cost per patient of administering IG was € 2,991 compared with € 3,675 for ID, translating into a 19% annual cost difference of € 684/patient. Base case results were robust to varying assumptions for insulin dose, insulin price, change in weight and proportion of ID once daily administrations. Conclusion: IG and ID basal-bolus regimes have comparative safety and efficacy, based on the Hollander study, IG however may represent a significantly more cost saving option for T2D patients in Germany requiring basal-bolus insulin analogue therapy with potential annual cost savings of € 684/patient compared to ID. Keywords: insulin glargine, insulin detemir, basal insulin, type 2 diabetes, cost analysis Continue reading >>

Effect Of Insulin Glargine On Glycemic Control In Adolescents With Type 1-diabetes

Effect Of Insulin Glargine On Glycemic Control In Adolescents With Type 1-diabetes

Abstract Adolescence is a transitional phase characterized by multiple physiological and psychosocial factors that make glycemic control more difficult, and often results in hyperglycemia and/or hypoglycemia-related emergencies, and increases the risk of chronic complications. Insulin analogs were introduced with the aim of overcoming such difficulties. To study the role of long acting insulin analog (insulin glargine) in glycemic control of adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes who suffer from frequent hypoglycemic attacks and marked glucose variability, and to compare its effectiveness and cost versus intermediate acting insulin (NPH) in a country with limited resources like Egypt. A non-randomized open label treat to target trial that included twenty-nine adolescents (10–18 years), with T1DM. They were on MDI regimen. All had unsatisfactory glycemic control with frequent hypoglycemia and/or recurrent glucose excursions. All were shifted from twice daily NPH to single bedtime injection of insulin glargine (Lantus), and followed up for a minimum period of 6 months. Switching to insulin glargine was associated with a statistically significant reduction in attacks of hypoglycemia and DKA (p < 0.001), but with insignificant reduction in HbA1c (p = 0.9). BMI showed a significant increase (p = 0.004), as well as the cost of basal insulin as glargine compared to NPH. The present study encourages the use of insulin glargine in the presence of significant hypoglycemia and glucose variability, with close monitoring of diet and weight. Cost effectiveness and effect on HbA1c and quality of life need further longitudinal studies with larger numbers. Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Savings

Savings

SAVINGS AND SUPPORT Worried about the cost of a new medication and beginning insulin? The BASAGLAR Savings Card and support materials may be able to help you get started. Indication BASAGLAR is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. Limitation of Use Important Safety Information Do not take BASAGLAR during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed. Before starting BASAGLAR, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. BASAGLAR should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. The most common side effect of insulin, including BASAGLAR, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life threatening. Signs and symptoms may include dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, slurred speech, shakiness, fast heartbeat, anxiety, irritability, mood change, or hunger. Do NOT dilute or mix BASAGLAR with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. BASAGLAR must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. BASAGLAR may cause s Continue reading >>

Lantus Coupon

Lantus Coupon

Use this FREE Lantus pharmacy coupon to get the lowest price on your pet's Lantus prescription. Our discount coupons are pre-activated and can be used at over 68,000 pharmacies nationwide to save up to 75% off your prescription medication. Print your coupon, it's pre-activated and ready for use. If you do not have a printer you can save or text the coupon to your phone. Present your pet drug coupon to the pharmacist when paying for your prescription. Lantus is the brand name for insulin glargine, an insulin analog made by Aventis. Lantus is a very long-acting insulin (lasting up to 24 hours in humans) that uses pH reactions to form micro-precipitates under the skin, which create a time-release action. Continue reading >>

Buy Lantus (insulin Glargine) Vials Online

Buy Lantus (insulin Glargine) Vials Online

Lantus (Insulin Glargine) 100 IU/mL Vials QTY TYPE PRICE COST PER UNIT 1 100IU/ML $141.00 $141.00 2 100IU/ML $209.16 $104.58 3 100IU/ML $298.02 $99.34 4 100IU/ML $386.88 $96.72 5 100IU/ML $475.75 $95.15 6 100IU/ML $564.60 $94.10 7 100IU/ML $653.45 $93.35 8 100IU/ML $742.32 $92.79 9 100IU/ML $831.15 $92.35 10 100IU/ML $920.00 $92.00 VIEW ALL INSULIN PRODUCTS PLACE A NEW INSULIN ORDER What is Lantus (Insulin Glargine) Vial? Lantus vial contains Lantus insulin, which is a brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin analog. Its absorption, distribution and metabolism in the body is very similar to naturally occurring human insulin produced in people who do not have diabetes. What is it used for? Lantus is used for the control of high blood sugar levels in the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. It is also prescribed for adults and children (aged 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes who require a long-acting insulin. It supplies a slow, consistent release of insulin all day to help regulate your blood sugar levels between meals and overnight. Your treatment may also require the support of a fast-acting mealtime insulin to help control blood sugar level spikes during meals. Lantus is typically used as a once daily, self-administered injection. It is not used for the treatment diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). How does it work? Lantus works by simulating the action of naturally occurring insulin, which normally controls blood sugar levels in the body. The primary function of insulin (including insulin glargine, the kind used in Lantus) is the regulation of sugar metabolism. It lowers blood sugar levels by stimulating blood sugar absorption from the blood into skeletal muscle and fat cells, and by blocking sugar production by the liver. Studies have shown that ins Continue reading >>

How Do I Get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively?

How Do I Get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively?

November 2, 2013-- How do I get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively? DCIN receives this question a few times a week from US caregivers of diabetic cats. I am often amazed by the question because of the “good” insulins for diabetic cats, Lantus can be the least expensive per unit. The problem often lies in knowing how to find the insulin inexpensively. (The hints I give also apply to Levemir, another human insulin often used by diabetic cats.) Your vet gave you a prescription that probably read “U100 Glargine/Lantus 10ml vial.” Lantus is the brand name for the generic insulin Glargine. Lantus is an insulin for humans and is only available from a human pharmacy (although some vets do hold some in stock). The company Sanofi makes Lantus, and no other companies currently make a generic Glargine because Sanofi still has an international patent on the insulin. That may change in 2014, and by then Sanofi may have developed a “second-generation” Lantus that is patent protected. Lantus is a U100 insulin, which describes the concentration of the insulin in the liquid suspension. A 10ml vial is the insulin’s containment device. It is a small glass bottle with a rubber stopper at the end that you pierce with a syringe. At a US retail pharmacy, a 10ml vial of Lantus can cost about $180 to $200. WOWZA! That does seem cause for sticker shock. A 10ml vial of U100 insulin holds 1000 units of insulin. At $200/vial, that is a price of $.20/unit. If your cat gets 2 units of insulin twice a day, that is $.80/day for its insulin (if you could completely use a vial of Lantus insulin). It would cost less each day to give your cat its life-saving medicine that to buy a soda from a vending machine. However, the problem with buying Lantus in a 10ml vial is that, properly handled, Lantus Continue reading >>

Lantus Prices Squeeze Veterinarians And Owners Of Diabetic Cats

Lantus Prices Squeeze Veterinarians And Owners Of Diabetic Cats

At more than $200 a 10-ml vial, the world’s most prescribed insulin is priced at or beyond the threshold of what many cat owners are able or willing to pay. Veterinarians are fielding complaints from clients, leaving some practitioners facing the delicate and time-consuming prospect of re-regulating their feline patients on other insulins. Dr. Michael Mihlfried, of Athol, Idaho, has prescribed Sanofi's Lantus (insulin glargine) for the past four years. Licensed for use in humans, a 10-ml vial of Lantus holds 1,000 units of the long-acting insulin. Many veterinarians say it can last a cat owner for months given that a moderate dosage is 2 to 3 units twice daily. “It’s the insulin I reach for when there's a diabetic cat,” Mihlfried said. “Most of my remissions have come by using Lantus. I have one particular owner who has told me he absolutely can’t afford to use it any longer. The cat is 18 years old. We’re going to try ProZinc." Manufactured by Boehringer Ingelheim, ProZinc is one of a couple of insulins licensed in the United States for use in cats. It costs about $100 for a 10-ml vial containing 400 units. Vetsulin, manufactured by Merck Animal Health, is another veterinary-specific insulin. It costs around $40 for a 400-unit, 10-ml vial. How these products compare in price to Lantus can vary depending on the patient. Diabetic cats respond differently to treatments. Some veterinarians find that Lantus, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in humans, works best in their diabetic feline patients. “All of my diabetics are on it,” said Dr. William Folger, a board-certified feline specialist in Houston. “It was $82 a bottle when it came out, roughly a decade ago. Then it went to $116 and $128. Now it’s being sold at Walgreen Continue reading >>

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

It looks like this page may be out of date. Please visit NerdWallet’s health hub for our latest content. Diabetics don’t have much of a choice when it comes to taking their insulin, and the costs can be very high, so a Lantus coupon can be invaluable. Paired with diabetic supplies like syringes and blood glucose testing equipment, diabetes is an expensive disease. But with a little bit of information and some resourcefulness, you may be able to save on your monthly prescriptions. Lantus is a long-acting insulin made by Sanofi-Aventis and prescribed to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. Diabetics are unable to naturally produce or use insulin like most people, so they take injections of synthetic insulin to help regulate their blood sugar. Generic Lantus At this time, there is no generic form of Lantus available. However, that may soon change. The patents protecting Lantus from cheaper generic alternatives expired in February 2015, so less expensive forms of the drug may be coming. When this happens, opting for generic will likely be the best way to save on Lantus, and because of FDA requirements, you don’t have to worry about the generic version being less effective or less safe. Although some people avoid buying generics because they are afraid they won’t work as well as the name brands, those fears are largely unfounded. Lantus coupons from the manufacturer One carton of Lantus can cost close to $400 without insurance, according to GoodRx.com, though Lantus may very well be part of your insurance formulary. Currently, the maker of the drug offers a Lantus Savings Card. According to its website, the card can reduce your prescription cost to no more than $25. However, it also says there is a maximum benefit of $100 off each prescription for the duration of the pr Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Update: Price Savings With Basaglar?

Insulin Glargine Update: Price Savings With Basaglar?

Insulin glargine biosimilars supposed to contribute 15% to total cost savings in overall biologic expenditures. According to a 2015 study by RAND, insulin glargine biosimilars/follow-on agents were supposed to contribute 15% to total cost savings in overall biologic expenditures. This would be substantial, considering the size of the insulin marketplace, and their potential to slow increasing market shares from next-generation long-acting insulins. But the savings may not be that quick to accrue. When Lilly introduces its version of insulin glargine (Basaglar) to the long-acting insulin market next month, what will the savings be? As a reminder, this product is not a biosimilar, according to its regulatory approval pathway, but a follow-on biologic, which means that it required more clinical trial data. But the savings may not be that quick to accrue. When Lilly introduces its version of insulin glargine (Basaglar) to the long-acting insulin market next month, what will the savings be? As a reminder, this product is not a biosimilar, according to its regulatory approval pathway, but a follow-on biologic, which means that it required more clinical trial data. For example, Lilly conducted 2 Phase 3 studies (ELEMENT-1 and ELEMENT-2) with patients with types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, respectively) who had been treated prior to enrolling in the investigation. Furthermore, design and development costs of the pen-delivery device must be considered. On this basis, one should not expect more than 15% discounts off of wholesale acquisition cost. This does not consider possible rebates and individual contracts made with CVS Health and OptumRx to prefer Basaglar and exclude Lantus® from coverage. However, it does seem reasonable that additional versions of insulin glargine will n Continue reading >>

Lantus Prices, Coupons And Patient Assistance Programs

Lantus Prices, Coupons And Patient Assistance Programs

Lantus (insulin glargine) is a member of the insulin drug class and is commonly used for Diabetes - Type 1 and Diabetes - Type 2. Lantus Prices This Lantus price guide is based on using the Drugs.com discount card which is accepted at most U.S. pharmacies. The cost for Lantus subcutaneous solution (100 units/mL) is around $276 for a supply of 10 milliliters, depending on the pharmacy you visit. Prices are for cash paying customers only and are not valid with insurance plans. Lantus is available as a brand name drug only, a generic version is not yet available. For more information, read about generic Lantus availability. Subcutaneous Solution Important: When there is a range of pricing, consumers should normally expect to pay the lower price. However, due to stock shortages and other unknown variables we cannot provide any guarantee. Drugs.com Printable Discount Card Print Now The free Drugs.com Discount Card works like a coupon and can save you up to 80% or more off the cost of prescription medicines, over-the-counter drugs and pet prescriptions. Please note: This is a drug discount program, not an insurance plan. Valid at all major chains including Walgreens, CVS Pharmacy, Target, WalMart Pharmacy, Duane Reade and 63,000 pharmacies nationwide. Lantus Coupons and Rebates Lantus offers may be in the form of a printable coupon, rebate, savings card, trial offer, or free samples. Some offers may be printed right from a website, others require registration, completing a questionnaire, or obtaining a sample from the doctor's office. Sanofi Rx Savings Card for Lantus: Eligible patients may pay $0 copay on each of up to 12 prescriptions; for additional information contact the program at 800-981-2491. Applies to: Lantus SoloSTAR Pen Number of uses: 12 times Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine - Price List Of 2 Brands

Insulin Glargine - Price List Of 2 Brands

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Lantus (insulin Glargine) Cost, Dosage, Prescribing Information And Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Cost, Dosage, Prescribing Information And Side Effects

Brand Name: Lantus Generic Name: insulin Glargine (rDNA Origin) Injection (vials and SoloStar) Medication Class: Long-Acting Insulin Manufacturer: Sanofi Aventis US FDA Approval Date: April 20, 2000 What is Lantus and its mechanism of action? Lantus (Insulin Glargine) is a long-acting type of insulin used for treating diabetes. Lantus is a biologic drug made by using recombinant DNA (rDNA) technology. Insulin is a hormone produced and released by beta cells in the pancreas. Insulin is released to help the body regulate blood glucose. Insulin release is triggered by an increase in blood glucose from food consumption. Lantus is a basal insulin analogue and it is equivalent to human insulin but it has a slower onset, no pronounced peak, and longer duration of action. Like other types of insulin Lantus regulates the use of glucose by the body. It lowers blood glucose by stimulating glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, and also reducing glucose production in the liver. Insulin enhances protein production and reduces the breakdown of protein into smaller protein molecules (polypeptides) and breakdown of fats to release fatty acids. What is Lantus used for treating? Lantus is used to lower blood glucose and improve diabetes control in adult and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. How effective is Lantus? In multiple studies in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes the effect of Lantus given once daily at bedtime on reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) was measured and compared against NPH once daily and twice daily. In two of the clinical studies, adult patients with type 1 diabetes were given Lantus or NPH insulin for 28 weeks. Regular insulin was administered before each meal. B Continue reading >>

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