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Getting Off Insulin Type 1

Type 1 Diabetic Off Insulin Thanks To Raw Food!!

Type 1 Diabetic Off Insulin Thanks To Raw Food!!

Type 1 diabetic off insulin thanks to RAW food!! Hey guys, my name is Taylor, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 14, an "incurable" disease which requires insulin shots every single day. Januray 1st I began a 100 percent raw diet, (thanks to the local whole foods) and iv been 7 days completely off insulin!! anyone with type 1 diabetes would know how incredibly amazing this feels, the funny thing is, I posted this on the diabetes forum, and everyone said i was lying, called me crazy, said I was going to die, and eventually even banned me. Lol, well anyway, just wanted to let u guys kno that RAW food is awesome, as if you didnt already kno. well it sounds a little fast, is all. theres another person that posts on another board and he's been raw for a long time and has reduced insulin but he didn't get off of it in 3 weeks. i'm not aware of any type 1's getting off ins., so maybe you could provide more info? Re: Type 1 diabetic off insulin thanks to RAW food!! I know its fast, its crazy, im not saying im cured or the diabetes is gone, im not going to jump to any conclusions, but iv been off insulin for 7 days and by Blood sugar has been stable, im just taking this thing one day at a time, but il post a chart of my food/blood sugar levels/activity of the first 2 days that they stabilized, and my story Ate Raw Wheat Free/Mineral Rich crusts w Guacamole Ate Large Salad/ Wheat Free Crusts w/ Avocado Im very excited, I saw my endo today and she couldnt believe it, they ran some bloodtests and stuff and im gna get the results back in a few days, Im not going to jump to any conclusions, im just taking this thing day by day. About 6 months ago I started wondering about alternative treatments, I tried acupuncture and herbal medications, didnt work, then I had a friend tel Continue reading >>

Johan Kotze Stopped Injecting Insulin For His Type 1 Diabetes A Month Ago, But How Is This Possible?

Johan Kotze Stopped Injecting Insulin For His Type 1 Diabetes A Month Ago, But How Is This Possible?

Johan Kotze stopped injecting insulin for his type 1 diabetes a month ago, but how is this possible? Jack is a 27-year-old journalist based in Coventry, UK. He is a type 1 diabetic who enjoys sport, boring weekends, MTV and once won a talent show for dancing to Dario Gs 1997 hit Sunchyme. Earlier this year we reported on Daniel Darkes, a man with type 1 diabetes who has been told a rare gene means hes been able to come off insulin. Its an incredible story, and it caught the eye of Johan Kotze. Johan has been completely off insulin for over a month, his blood sugars are normal and he feels great. Could lightning have struck twice? Like Daniel Darkes , Johan was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in February 2011. He was 46 at the time, living in Poole, Dorset, having been born in Namibia and growing up in South Africa. Following his diagnosis he was assigned Lantus and NovoRapid insulin therapy; his blood sugars began to stabilise after three months. In October 2014 Johan began a dedicated exercise regime. He completed his first Tough Mudder one year later and added circuit classes to his workout each week. He noticed his blood glucose levels were lowering significantly and, fearful that his long-acting insulin was reducing his levels further, Johan made a bold decision. In January this year I stopped injecting Lantus. My fasting BS was too low and by mid-day my BS would be below 4 mmol/l, Johan told Diabetes.co.uk. Of course, this is not a decision to be made lightly and without the consent of your doctor. At the time, Johan was convinced this was the right decision, and he has not injected any Lantus since. To discuss his long-acting insulin cessation, Johan arranged a meeting with his diabetes consultant on 1 August. It proved to be a significant day. He asked me to eat Continue reading >>

Has Anyone Come Off Insulin | Diabetic Connect

Has Anyone Come Off Insulin | Diabetic Connect

By rickbond1973 Latest Reply2013-05-22 11:00:52 -0500 Just wonderinghas anyone been on insulin and eventually been weaned off of it? T2 for a couple years nowdoing horribly. Yesterday I noticed pain in both my feet and testedalmost 500. Scared the crap out of menot the number (sadly), but the number PLUS the pain. Feet still hurt a littletested 371 this morning after a coffee and bagel on the way to work. Going to call my PCP after this message. I imagine I will end up on insulin very soon as I haven't had any luck with my diet and time to exercise is difficult. I knowexcuses excuses. I have a coworker that tells me once you go on insulinhe thinks there's no coming back off of it. Just wanted some input on that. Back to shareended up seeing a different doctor at my doctors office as mine was out for the week. She was veryummstop being dumb and fix it. She didn't actually say that, but her personality did. They put me on Glyburide, in addition to my Metformin, and probably 30 minutes after my first 5mg dose of Glyburide, while cycling on a spin bikeI started feeling REALLY weirdtested 54. Woh!! I saw under 170 probably 4 times since being diagnosed 2 years'ish prior. I did change some eating habitsnot entirely, but worked AGAIN at it. Seemed like every other day that week I was dropping lowwasn't used to it at allstill not, though at least it's not foreign to me now. I probably go overboard trying to compensate when it gets lowoh well. So nowit's rare that I see over 200 (my morning bagel and coffee on the way to work still out me overI'm sorryI love my bagel in the morning). I laughed at the doctor when she said to make sure I had something sugary on me after taking the first pillshe wins. I'm anywhere from mid 50's to 180 at this pointmostly probably 105 to 130'ishdon Continue reading >>

Can Type 1 Ever Come Off Insulin ?

Can Type 1 Ever Come Off Insulin ?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Is it possible for type 1 people who use insulin, to ever come off it and be "normal" if you know what I mean ? I ask this as I watched some film about diabetes and they recon it's possible, through a special diet, I contacted this company last year and they did say it was posible, but did not run a course in the UK. Yes a T1 CAN come off external insulin, but the procedure involves a pancreas transplant (or rather, addition), which is not uncomplicated surgery, is very rarely done on it's own and not without special circumstances or indications. More common with a kidney - 2 organs in one op - but both of these scenarios require you to be on immunosuppressants permanently, and a lot further down the road in the first place. Even islet transplant patients still require daily injections of insulin in 75-80% of cases. Your body requires insulin to function even if you don't eat, so I don't think any "special" course or diet is going to do anything, except maybe empty your bank account... without the above transplant it isnt possible, diet alone would not be sufficient and we would die :? You CAN come off, but Stay healthy at the same time!!!! You CAN come off, but Stay healthy at the same time!!!! Lorna, Hana is saying that you can't stay healthy off insulin, not that you can come off it.( I think :? ) Check Watercure2 dot com. Loads of great info for Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Snake oil and Lily the Pink springs to mind! Watercure......the infamous Dr Batmanjelly ? I don't think so. Apparently it 'cures' everything, so I'm told....... :lol: Anyone ever watched the video called " Reversing Diabetes " ? This is a link to there website, not much on there Continue reading >>

Caroline’s Story: Overcoming Type 1 Diabetes With Real Food

Caroline’s Story: Overcoming Type 1 Diabetes With Real Food

Today, Caroline Potter from Colorful Eats, has an amazing story of recovery for you. She’s worked with the same nutritionist that I have these last few years, and has been able to treat Type 1 diabetes with a nutrient-dense diet and natural supplements. It’s another encouraging story of how food can play a significant role in our fight against disease! Treating Diabetes with Real Food Life in your 20s seems pretty grand. You feel powerful, youthful and energized. Dreams seem within your reach and challenges seem conquerable. Then out of the blue, college bliss turns into doctors offices and waiting rooms. Countless tests of all forms, vague results and no answers as to what was wrong with me. As I came home from college that winter for Christmas break, I laid on the couch for most of my vacation. I was constantly starving, eating everything in sight but quickly loosing weight. Finally, one day while out to dinner with my family, I broke down in tears because my mouth was so dry, I could barely talk. I was experiencing dry mouth, one of the major symptoms of diabetes. Diabetes? I was 20, a seemingly healthy young girl, who grew up in a home where my mother fed us all organic food. I was the one in school with her carrot sticks and tuna salad sandwiches. I never drank soda or ate Oreos, so the thought of diabetes was never even on my radar. Barely able to walk up a flight of stairs, I checked myself into the ER to discover my blood sugar levels were in a diabetic coma range. Later the next morning, the doctor diagnosed me with type 1 diabetes. I was scared, hopeless and confused. The days that followed were difficult to say the least. I still felt sick all the time, gained over 20 pounds in 2 weeks and felt terribly alone. My legs turned black and blue from giving mys Continue reading >>

Why Insulin Use Isn't Always Permanent For Type 2 Diabetes

Why Insulin Use Isn't Always Permanent For Type 2 Diabetes

Weight loss and exercise may reduce your need for insulin.(HEALTH/FOTOLIA) If your doctor puts you on insulin, it's not necessarily permanent. Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, who need insulin to survive, people with type 2 diabetes use insulin as just one more tool to control blood sugar. You may be able to go off insulin if you can get your blood sugar under control using diet and exercise. "A person who is very, very obese or very heavy will find that if they lose a large amount of weight, their insulin requirements or their oral medication requirements may drop tremendouslyeven disappear," says Richard Hellman, MD, former president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Taking insulin just after diagnosis may also make it easier in the long term to control your blood sugar with diet and exercise, according William Bornstein, MD, an endocrinologist at the Emory Clinic in Atlanta. Stopping Insulin Some people may be able to stop taking it Watch videoMore about using insulin Glucose toxicity "When the sugar has been running high it creates in and of itself a resistance to other things to bring it down. It's a term we call glucose toxicity," says Dr. Bornstein. "So let's say that somebody comes in and their blood sugar is running pretty high and they want to try diet and exercise. It's less likely that the diet and exercise will work to bring it down. "So we might use medication for a period of time, bring it down, then stop the medication and let that individual have a period of time to try diet and exercise and see if that'll work to keep it down," says Dr. Bornstein. If you've developed diabetes recently and needed insulin right away, there's a better chance that you may be able to eventually reduce your dose or even stop taking insulin if you e Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes . . . Cured?

Type 1 Diabetes . . . Cured?

Carrie posted this wonderfully thought-provoking comment about her diabetic son: My 13 yr old son was diagnosed over a year ago with Type 1 [diabetes]. Before his diagnosis, I was very ‘green’ — bought organic foods, bought meat from free-range, grass-fed local farms, cleaned my house with products I made myself from vinegar and natural products. But we did follow the low-fat, low-calorie, high-fiber, healthy whole grain diet. We were told “eat whatever you want” — just dose for it [with insulin] and be healthy (yep: low-fat, high-fiber, etc.) I didn’t think so: If he has a carb problem, then limit carbs! We immediately went low-carb, causing us to remove a lot of wheat products, but didn’t know about the damages of gluten then. His last two A1Cs [hemoglobin A1c’s, a 60-90 day reflection of blood sugar fluctuations] have been 5.3% [normal range]. He was taken off his basal insulin and his bolus, continuing to less and less. Today, he is OFF insulin! YES, he is a Type 1 diabetic: They double-checked for the antibodies in case he was misdiagnosed–they are there. Even without insulin, his blood sugars are better than me or his dad, or even sister (we all check now). And all this while growing over 5 inches in one year, going through puberty and the stomach flu with no problems (scary for Type 1 diabetics). His doctors are amazed. We all still did not know how he was this way, until someone shared with me Wheat Belly. We are all going completely gluten-free now and staying low-carb. Maybe my asthma will be gone and my daughter’s horrible itchy rash all over her arms will finally leave! Absolutely wonderful book, thank you! Wow. We know that consumption of modern wheat is associated with causing type 1 diabetes in children, average age of onset 4 years Continue reading >>

Can You Get Off Insulin?

Can You Get Off Insulin?

So, my A1c was 11.2 after not really taking my T2 very seriously for 3 years. Highest ever and I had absolutely no symptoms. I've been on met 500 2x daily but didn't bother with checking or even going back to the doctor as my last A1c was a nice respectable 5.6 on that dose. Fast forward to October 27 when another issue forced me back to the doctor and they did a quick office A1c. With a result that high she wanted to attack it with the big guns so doubled my met and put me on 12 units of Tresiba daily. In just 8 days my AM fasting blood glucose went from over 200 to 93 and has been as low as 83. My diet is completely turned around too. Basically anything that tastes good is gone. No snacks, all low carb, around 50-60 day. I also began exercising again and have lost a few pounds. I respond really well to diet and exercise and admit I let it slide way too long. I hope I can get used to this very restricted way of eating. Right now I'm testing a lot to see what sends me up and what doesn't. My meter has me at a 14 day 130 average which includes some of the high numbers at the beginning. My 1 hour readings after meals rarely exceed 140. My question is this- Is it possible to discontinue the basal insulin or is it like I've read that once on it you're on it for life? My doc says once my A1c goes below 7 she will take the Tresiba away and see what happens. I'd rather cut the met in half as the side effects are still present but not as bad as the first week. She says hang in and it will get better. I seem to be OK one day and can't leave the house for hours the next but the worst is when it wakes me at night. So glad I'm retired and don't have to get up for work. I just turned 70 but I'm a really active person. I'm busier now than I was when I was working! To those who have Continue reading >>

British Man With Type 1 Diabetes To Receive Tests After Coming Off Insulin

British Man With Type 1 Diabetes To Receive Tests After Coming Off Insulin

US doctors are conducting tests on a British man who no longer uses insulin to treat his type 1 diabetes. Daniel Darkes, from Daventy in Northamptonshire, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes seven years ago. But his recent tests have baffled doctors as his pancreas has shown signs of working properly again. Branded 'Miracle Dan' by his friends, the 30-year-old recently travelled to America so doctors could run tests to further understand what had happened to his body. Speaking to the Northampton Chronicle and Echo newspaper, he said: "I had numerous tests, about four or five, to confirm the main reason why my pancreas had started producing insulin again. "One of the tests involved me running on a treadmill. They starved me for a good six hours before, and I spent about 30 minutes running at a constant speed to see if my brain went into a kind of shock mode, or starvation mode, to see if it would send signals down to the organs, i.e. my pancreas, which it did." The doctors also inserted a microchip into his back to measure his protein levels and shone a UV light on his pancreas to detect cells. Doctors think the medical breakthrough might have been caused by a signal sent from his brain to his pancreas. He is also a long-distance runner, which could have contributed to his improved health. Mr Darkes was as surprised as anyone, adding: "You can reverse type 2 diabetes through dieting and exercise, [but type 1 reversal] is not something that happens every day. So, if the pancreas is able to recharge itself in some way then that is a big step." Mr Darkes says that doctors are now 80 per cent convinced he is cured of the condition, which has never before been reversed. The findings from Mr Darkes' test results are set to be published next week and it is hoped they will help f Continue reading >>

How To Get Off Insulin For Type 2 Diabetes

How To Get Off Insulin For Type 2 Diabetes

Nowadays, with so many drugs having severe side effects, insulin has become the go-to therapy for many doctors who treat type 2 diabetes. But if you want to get off insulin and you’re type 2 diabetic, there are several things that you should know. First, before I talk about insulin, it is important that I stress, insulin has many advantages, as well as disadvantages. And before using any of this material, consult with your physician. Everyone is different and if your doctor put you on insulin there is usually a good reason. Why Doctors Put People on Insulin Most of the doctors that I work with, have all admitted that they’re guilty of using insulin as a threat. They have said that they tell patients who don’t keep their sugar in check that they are going to have to prescribe insulin as a wake-up call or punishment for poor control. But sometimes, if someone has sky-high blood sugar, their doctor will put them on insulin right away. And Endocrinologists, usually treat more aggressively and use insulin at the drop of a hat. When most of the drugs that a doctor prescribes all fail, a doctor will usually use insulin as a last resort. And if a person is on 3 drugs for diabetes and they are all failing to control blood sugar levels, it’s usually hard to argue. So the biggest reason why doctors prescribe insulin is because drugs alone aren’t getting it done. But more and more doctors are starting to use insulin earlier for type 2 diabetics. Because diet and exercise are going by the wayside and people are relying more on medications to help control diabetes. One very good reason for prescribing insulin is when your pancreas can no longer produce anymore insulin. Much like type 1 diabetes, where insulin injections are required for survival, in type 2 when the pancreas Continue reading >>

Do You Worry About Getting Insulin Shots For Type 2 Diabetes?

Do You Worry About Getting Insulin Shots For Type 2 Diabetes?

When your doctor says you have type 2 diabetes, you mayworry about getting shots of insulin to control the disease. But thats seldom the first step, and some people dont need insulin for years or ever. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy When you have type 2 diabetes , yourbody doesnt make enough insulin, as the body is unable to use it properly. Without insulin, blood glucose (sugar) levels rise. High blood glucose levels can damage your organs, including blood vessels, nerves, kidneys and eyes. But with lifestyle changes and medications, many people are staying healthier longer with type 2 diabetes. Endocrinologist Richard Shewbridge, MD , says there is lotyou can do to live well with diabetes . Type 2 diabetes developsbecause the body becomes resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas to turn blood sugar into energy.Type 2 diabetes means theprocess to turn food into energy isnt working as well, says Dr. Shewbridge. Poor choices in diet and lack of exercise work to worsen insulin resistance, he says. And genetics can play a role, too.Additionally, people with type 2 diabetes tend to make less and less insulin over time and that causes a rise in blood sugar after meals. Many people with type 2 diabetes arent put on medication right away. Your doctor will likely suggest changes in your eating and exercise habits first. Once someone is put on medication, they may need it for the rest of their life. But, they also can treat diabetes with a healthy lifestyle and exercise, says Dr. Shewbridge. Healthier eating habits are a good place to start. Cut out simple sugars. Eat less starchy bread, pasta, noodles and cerea Continue reading >>

How To Cure Diabetes And Get Off Insulin

How To Cure Diabetes And Get Off Insulin

Here's a guest post on how someone got off insulin and cure diabetes in about 2 months after nine years on prescription drugs! And if only she'd known about this "blood sugar supplement" she could have prevented the whole problem before it ever started! June was a 56-year-old with diabetes. She had been on insulin and oral prescription medications for nine years when she agreed to test a new natural solution. Within six weeks, she stopped not only her insulin but another prescription drug as well. In just six weeks an alternative doctor solved a problem that mainstream medicine couldn't handle in nine years and for thousands of dollars. The fact is that it costs the typical diabetic around $10,000 a year for treatment. Conventional medicine soaked this woman for maybe $90,000 to treat a medical problem that plant remedies cured in no time at all! A standard diabetes test showed June went from severely diabetic to healthy in the course of the treatment. But this diabetes breakthrough almost didn't happen. Believe it or not, Jon Barron, the acclaimed researcher who found this remedy, wanted nothing to do with creating a diabetes treatment. He thought it would be a mistake to use herbs and nutrients to manage the symptoms of diabetes rather than addressing the root cause, mainly the way we eat. What changed Jon's mind was the galloping diabetes epidemic all around us. Nearly 20 million Americans already have full-blown diabetes, and up to 40 percent of the rest of us are pre-diabetic. Diabetes is the No. 6 cause of death in the United States, and it's destined to move up the charts pretty quickly, given the way we eat. It's hard to believe, but the average American scarfs down 152 pounds of sugar a year. It's easy to do, even if you think you're being careful. For instance Continue reading >>

Can You Ever Stop Insulin?

Can You Ever Stop Insulin?

Once you begin using insulin to treat type 2 diabetes, can you ever get off it and go back to medications? — Anne, Minnesota For someone to go back to oral diabetes medicines after starting insulin, the pancreas must be able to produce enough insulin to maintain normal sugar levels. That being said, there are several instances in which insulin injections may be stopped. Here are a few: 1. In some individuals who have had untreated or poorly controlled diabetes for several weeks to months, glucose levels are high enough to be directly toxic to the pancreas. This means that the pancreas has not completely lost its ability to produce the critical level of insulin, but it does not work properly as a result of high glucose levels. In this instance, injected insulin can be used for several days or weeks to reduce glucose and help the pancreas to revert back to its usual level of functioning — a level that can control glucose supported by oral medicines. Once this occurs, insulin can be stopped. Remember, oral diabetes medicines work well only if the pancreas can still produce and release insulin. 2. Sometimes insulin is given during an acute illness such as an infection, when glucose levels can be high and the demand for insulin is greater than the pancreas can handle. After the illness is treated adequately, oral medicines can be started again. 3. Many obese individuals with diabetes who require insulin can reduce their dose or control their diabetes by taking oral medicines if they lose weight. However, the choice of insulin to manage diabetes does not always come after exhausting all oral or non-insulin options. Insulin has several advantages and is now more frequently introduced early in the management of type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for 25 years now. The relentlessness of type 1, and the fact that I will probably live with this non-preventable condition for the rest of my life never goes away, but I have almost made peace with it. A few days ago, I saw something that gave me pause. “British man with type 1 diabetes to receive tests after coming off insulin,” read Diabetes.co.uk’s headline. The article goes onto say that, “Daniel Darkes, from Daventy in Northamptonshire, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes seven years ago. But his recent tests have baffled doctors as his pancreas has shown signs of working properly again.” My first thoughts upon reading this were, “this can’t be true,” and “what’s the real explanation here?” There are many types of diabetes including type 2, LADA, and monogenic. Maybe he actually had one of those types instead of type 1. Usually, tests can determine this quickly though, so why was it not the case with Dan? I live in the UK and I wanted to get to the bottom of things. I managed to get in touch with ‘Miracle Dan’, as he’s been called by his friends. Although he is saving the specific details of his recent test results from the U.S. for an upcoming exclusive interview with another media outlet, he spoke to me and answered some of my questions about everything that has been happening. Please tell us a bit about yourself and your diabetes. When were you diagnosed? I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes back in February 2011 at the age of 23, after just leaving the army. I started a new engineering job and within two weeks of starting, I noticed the traditional symptoms of type 1 diabetes: thirst, weight loss, blurry vision, and a lot of vomiting. I collapsed and was taken by ambulance to hospital where I wa Continue reading >>

British Man With Type 1 Diabetes Receives Tests In Us After Coming Off Insulin Injections

British Man With Type 1 Diabetes Receives Tests In Us After Coming Off Insulin Injections

A British man with type 1 diabetes has flown to the US for tests after revealing he no longer uses insulin. Daniel Darkes, 30, has been living with type 1 diabetes for seven years, but the Daventry-born ex-Army officer has baffled doctors with his recent test results. Mr Darkes pancreas has shown signs of working properly again, and his blood sugar levels have normalized, which led to him coming off his insulin injections. He has since spent four days in St Louis so doctors can run tests to determine what has happened to his body and whether insulin is being produced. Speaking to the Northampton Chronicle and Echo newspaper, he said: I had numerous tests, about four or five, to confirm the main reason why my pancreas had started producing insulin again. One of the tests involved me running on a treadmill. They starved me for a good six hours before, and I spent about 30 minutes running at a constant speed to see if my brain went into a kind of shock mode, or starvation mode, to see if it would send signals down to the organs, i.e. my pancreas, which it did. Mr Darkes, who has been branded Miracle Dan by his friends, also had a microchip inserted into his back to measure his protein levels, and a UV light was shone on his pancreas to detect insulin-producing cells. Doctors believe this breakthrough could be due to a signal sent from Mr Darkes brain to his pancreas, while Mr Darkes hypothesises his love for running as a contributor to his improved health. The findings from Mr Darkes test results are set to be published next week. It is hoped they will shed light on whether he can continue without insulin injections, and potentially lead to future treatments for type 1 diabetes. Continue reading >>

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