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Gestational Diabetes Placenta Breaking Down

Gestational Diabetes Placenta Deterioration

Gestational Diabetes Placenta Deterioration

The gestational diabetes placenta The placenta is the organ between the baby and mother which is responsible for providing oxygen and nutrients to the baby through the blood flow in the umbilical cord and removing waste and carbon dioxide from the baby, back to the mother. As we know, gestational diabetes increases the amount of glucose flowing through the bloodstream to the baby but the gestational diabetes placenta may also have growth, structural and functional differences to that of a non-diabetic mother: In diabetes, the placenta undergoes a variety of structural and functional changes (rev. in1–3). Their nature and extent depend on a range of variables including the quality of glycemic control achieved during the critical periods in placental development, the modality of treatment, and the time period of severe departures from excellent metabolic control of a non-diabetic environment. Placental structure and function can be changed as a result of maternal diabetes. The nature and extent of these changes depend on the type of diabetes and on the gestational period. Consequences of gestational and pregestational diabetes on placental function and birth weight Gestational diabetes placenta issues Having gestational diabetes means that we are at a higher risk of having placenta issues, although other factors can also cause placenta issues such as other types of diabetes, hypertension, anaemia, blood clotting disorders, smoking and drug abuse during pregnancy. Many terms may be used for gestational diabetes placenta issues such as placenta deterioration, placenta insufficiency, placenta failure, placenta dysfunction, premature ageing, calcification and impaired placenta function. Gestational diabetes placenta issues can occur when there are problems with blood flow t Continue reading >>

Special Health Concerns During Pregnancy

Special Health Concerns During Pregnancy

Pregnancy makes you more aware of your body. It also brings a long list of changes, so it's not always easy to know when to call your healthcare provider. Here's a look at some of the common complications women may experience - and what to do if they happen to you. Vaginal Bleeding One quarter of pregnant women will have some spotting or light vaginal bleeding. Vaginal bleeding during pregnancy is more common among women who have been pregnant before than in women who are pregnant for the first time. A small amount of bleeding in the first trimester doesn't mean you're having a miscarriage, but vaginal bleeding in the second or third trimester may be serious. When you call your healthcare provider, let them know the following: What colour is the blood? pink, brown or red? Are there any clots in the blood? When did it start? What were you doing when it started? How much is there? For example, is it spotting the size of a quarter, or soaking your underwear? Did it happen after intercourse or a vaginal examination? Are you having cramps, pain, or any other symptoms? Vaginal bleeding during pregnancy is always a concern. If you have bleeding or spotting, stop whatever you're doing and talk to your healthcare provider immediately. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes can develop during pregnancy when hormones change the way your body uses insulin. Sometimes, a pregnant woman has been living with diabetes without knowing it. Symptoms of diabetes may include: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Increased hunger. Blurred vision. Pregnancy causes most women to urinate more often and to feel hungrier, so having these symptoms does not always mean that a woman has diabetes. Regular exercise and a healthy diet can help keep your blood sugar level within a target range and p Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Placenta Breaking Down

Gestational Diabetes Placenta Breaking Down

Gestational Diabetes Placenta Breaking Down Suggestions an evidence regarding Gestational Diabetes Placenta Breaking Down along with things related with Criteria For Gestational Diabetes Australia you can expect to you find the best solutions of health data safe and comfortable in addition to some connected with his various other articles. even when this is very much evidence regarding Gestational Diabetes Placenta Breaking Down are offered online, but almost all of it is actually less clear and is particularly not accurate enough. Therefore, we present learn more Gestational Diabetes Placenta Breaking Down complete like a reference in your case. We hope we present the next explanation is helpful for almost everyone. Gestational diabetes just happens through pregnancy. If you might have it, you can certainly still possess a healthy little one, with help from a doctor and also by carrying out simple things each day to take care of your blood sugar levels. Related Image Of Gestational Diabetes Placenta Breaking Down After your baby is given birth to, you might not exactly have diabetes nowadays. Gestational diabetes enables you to more prone to develop form 2 diabetes, but it wont undoubtedly happen. Will cause Gestational Diabetes Placenta Breaking Down While in pregnancy, the placenta creates hormones that can result in a escalation of sugar as part of your blood. Usually, your pancreas can make enough insulin to address that. If certainly not, your glucose levels will rise which enables it to cause gestational diabetes. You are more inclined to get gestational diabetes when: You ended up overweight before you got expecting a baby. You are usually African-American, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American. Your glucose levels are higher, but not really high enough being dia Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes (pronounced jess-TAY-shun-ul die-uh-BEET-eez) is one of the most common health problems for pregnant women. It affects about 5 percent of all pregnancies, which means there are about 200,000 cases each year. If not treated, gestational diabetes can cause health problems for mother and fetus. The good news is that gestational diabetes can be treated, especially if it is found early in the pregnancy. There are some things that women with gestational diabetes can do to keep themselves well and their pregnancies healthy. Controlling gestational diabetes is the key to a healthy pregnancy. and can be achieved by following the Gestational Diabetes Treatment Plan. Gestational Diabetes is a kind of diabetes that only pregnant women get. In fact, the word gestational means “during pregnancy.” If a woman gets diabetes or high blood sugar when she is pregnant, it is gestational diabetes. Diabetes Diabetes means your blood sugar is too high. Diabetes is a disease of metabolism, which is the way your body uses food for energy and growth. Your stomach and intestines break down (or digest) much of the food you eat into a simple sugar called glucose (pronounced GLOO-kos). Glucose is your body’s main source of energy. After digestion, the glucose passes into your bloodstream, which is why glucose is also called blood sugar. Once in the blood, the glucose is ready for your body cells to use. However, your cells need insulin (pronounced IN-suh-lin), a hormone made by your body, to get the glucose. Insulin “opens” your cells so that glucose can get in. When your metabolism is normal, your body makes enough insulin to move all the glucose smoothly from your bloodstream into your cells. If you have diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin and your cells Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Giving Birth

Gestational Diabetes And Giving Birth

The latest guidance from NICE, published in 2015, has extended the time by which women with gestational diabetes should give birth to 40 weeks, 6 days – not much less than the general guidance for all pregnant women, which is 42 weeks. If you have not gone to birth at this point, induction of labour will be recommended. "When I was in the hospital, I felt I didn’t know what was going on. I would have liked more information about that part so I could have been better prepared." Gemma, mum of one The main reason for induction is to prevent stillbirth. For all women, the risk increases when their pregnancy goes past 42 weeks. However, one study has shown that women with gestational diabetes may be at risk earlier. So for this reason, the guidance in England and Wales states that if you have gestational diabetes, you should not go beyond 40 weeks, 6 days. An induction or caesarean may also be advised if your baby is very large (macrosomia) – as this may cause difficulties during the birth. On the other hand induction may also be recommended if the team detects poor growth in your baby. In Scotland, most women with diabetes in pregnancy are induced within 40 weeks. The guidance says that this decision should be determined on an individual basis. If you are taking diabetes medication or insulin, it recommends that you should be assessed at 38 weeks and delivered by 40 weeks. Choices you might need to make for labour and birth Most women with gestational diabetes have a healthy birth. But before you make your birth plan, you may need to take some things into account to make sure you and your baby are safe during and after the birth. If you have gestational diabetes, you will have less choice about where to deliver your baby. This is because you will need to deliver your Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Placenta Breaking Down

Gestational Diabetes Placenta Breaking Down

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Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

“i Have Been Having Hypo’s More Often.”

“i Have Been Having Hypo’s More Often.”

Sherree saw me for management of her first pregnancy. She had been a diabetic for five years before her pregnancy. Before her first visit with me she had an appointment with her endocrinologist. Prior to being pregnant he had managed her diabetes with oral medications – Metformin and Diamicron. Now that she was pregnant he switched her to insulin. As well her blood pressure was elevated when she saw him and so he commenced her on Aldomet. Sherree’s first visit with me was when she was eight weeks pregnant. She was already needing considerable insulin (124 units) each day to keep her blood sugar level in the normal range. She was requiring 250mg of Aldomet twice per day to maintain a normal blood pressure. Her pregnancy overall progressed well. Her insulin and requirements gradually increased, as expected. At 35 weeks pregnancy she was on 186 units of insulin per day. She also had biochemical evidence of preeclampsia on a background of hypertension. She now required an Aldomet dose of 1000 mg four times per day to maintain her blood pressure in the normal range I had advised her, as I do all pregnant patients with diabetes managed by insulin, that they can expect increasing insulin requirements as the pregnancy advances. That is because the hormones released by the placenta in pregnancy that cause the mother’s blood sugar level to increase and also and makes her body less sensitive to insulin-less able to use it properly. Hence more insulin is required to keep the blood sugar level in the normal range. Sherree contacted me on a Sunday evening by Facebook private messaging when she was 36 weeks gestation to say that she had falling insulin requirements. She stated in her message: “I have noticed that my BSL has been low and I haven’t had my insulin at least once Continue reading >>

Placental Insufficiency

Placental Insufficiency

The placenta is an organ that grows in the womb during pregnancy. Placental insufficiency (also called placental dysfunction or uteroplacental vascular insufficiency) is an uncommon but serious complication of pregnancy. It occurs when the placenta does not develop properly, or is damaged. It is a blood flow disorder marked by a reduction in the mother’s blood supply. This complication can also occur when blood supply doesn’t adequately increase by mid-pregnancy. When the placenta malfunctions, it is unable to supply adequate oxygen and nutrients to the baby from the mother’s bloodstream. Without this vital support, the baby cannot grow and thrive. This can lead to low birth weight, premature birth, and birth defects. It also carries increased risks of complications for the mother. Diagnosing this problem early is crucial to the health of both mother and baby. The placenta is a highly complex biological organ. It forms and grows where the fertilized egg attaches to the wall of the uterus. The umbilical cord grows from the placenta to the baby’s navel. It allows blood to flow from mother to baby, and back again. The mother’s blood and the baby’s blood are filtered through the placenta, but they never actually mix. The placenta’s primary jobs are to: move oxygen into the baby’s bloodstream carry carbon dioxide away pass nutrients to the baby transfer waste for disposal by the mother’s body The placenta has an important role in hormone production as well. It also protects the fetus from harmful bacteria and infections. A healthy placenta continues to grow throughout the pregnancy. The American Pregnancy Association estimates that the placenta weighs 1 to 2 pounds at the time of birth. The placenta is removed during labor. According to the Mayo Clinic, it Continue reading >>

The Human Placenta In Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

The Human Placenta In Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

The insulin and cytokine network The placenta is a complex fetal organ that fulfills pleiotropic roles during fetal growth. It separates the maternal and fetal circulation, with which it is in contact through different surfaces, i.e., the syncytiotrophoblast exposes the placenta to the maternal circulation and the endothelium is in contact with fetal blood. Because of this unique position, the placenta is exposed to the regulatory influence of hormones, cytokines, growth factors, and substrates present in both circulations and, hence, may be affected by changes in any of these. In turn, it can produce molecules that will affect mother and fetus independently. The human placenta expresses virtually all known cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, resistin, and leptin, which are also produced by the adipose cells. The discovery that some of these adipokines are key players in the regulation of insulin action suggests possible novel interactions between the placenta and adipose tissue in understanding pregnancy-induced insulin resistance. The interplay between the two systems becomes more evident in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). In diabetes, the placenta undergoes a variety of structural and functional changes (rev. in 1–3). Their nature and extent depend on a range of variables including the quality of glycemic control achieved during the critical periods in placental development, the modality of treatment, and the time period of severe departures from excellent metabolic control of a nondiabetic environment. Placental development is characterized by three distinct periods. At the beginning of gestation, a series of critical proliferation and differentiation processes predominantly of the trophoblast eventually lead to the formation of villous and ex Continue reading >>

Diabetic Mommy - Diabetes And Pregnancy - Gestational Diabetes Type 1 Type 2 Diabetic Pregnacy Parenting Children

Diabetic Mommy - Diabetes And Pregnancy - Gestational Diabetes Type 1 Type 2 Diabetic Pregnacy Parenting Children

After a string of good tests and no apparent complications, I went in for my routine bi-weekly check on Thursday, April 26, at around 37 weeks. I had my Stephen King book and hunkered down for the test, impatiently waiting for it to be done. I was in a particular hurry this weekend because I was having a baby shower on Saturday and I wanted to go get my haircut and do some other girlie things. The fetal monitoring showed no irregularity. Then I went in for the sonogram check. I could tell by the sonographer's face that something was amiss. She went out to get a doctor. My heart stopped. I had recently taken myself to the ER a couple times the past couple weeks when I wasn't feeling the baby's regular kicking. They said nothing was wrong - but could something have happened? I was on pins and needles. The doctor came in, never even looked at me, turned to the sonographer and simply said, "induce" and walked out. I thought he meant the plan was changed and we would induce later. It turned out he wanted to induce that evening. It turned out my amniotic fluid was too low. It had fallen below the magic number "5" (cm). My placenta had started to break down, and it was time for my little baby to come out and meet everyone. Like I mentioned earlier, the placenta is a big temporary organ. For some reason it starts to break down sooner in diabetics, and that is exactly what happened to me. Thank goodness for modern medicine and fetal monitoring. I went back to see Patty, the midwife. She checked and told me I was dilated 2 cm. My instructions were to go home, get my stuff, and check into the hospital. It was taking a while for the situation to sink in because I kept telling her I couldn't have the baby now because I had plans for the weekend. I called the hubby and he excitedly Continue reading >>

Consequences Of Gestational And Pregestational Diabetes On Placental Function And Birth Weight

Consequences Of Gestational And Pregestational Diabetes On Placental Function And Birth Weight

Go to: INTRODUCTION Diabetes in pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and remains a significant medical challenge. Diabetes during pregnancy may be divided into clinical diabetes (women with previously diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes) and gestational diabetes. The American Diabetes Association defines gestational diabetes as “any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy”, but provides diagnostic thresholds for fasting and post-glucose loading values. The International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups recently published a consensus derived from the Hyperglycemia Adverse Pregnancy Outcome study data, suggested that all pregnant women without known diabetes should have a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at 24-28 wk of gestation[1]. Gestational diabetes would be diagnosed if one or more values met or exceeded the following levels of glucose: fasting 5.1 mmol/L, 1 h post glucose 10.0 mmol/L and 2 h post glucose 8.5 mmol/L. While diabetes in pregnancy is associated with increased obstetric risk compared with normal pregnancy, the overall contribution of diabetes to most obstetric and neonatal complications on a population basis is low, with the largest impact being on shoulder dystocia. Except malformations, which are likely to have resulted from preconceptional or periconceptional hyperglycemia, improvements in obstetric practice have led to major reductions in adverse outcomes. Prepregnancy care for women with diabetes was introduced a long time ago and is associated with improved pregnancy outcomes. However, overall pregnancy outcomes remain very poor for women with diabetes with only a third receiving prepregnancy care. The importance of other metabolic fac Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is one of the most common health problems of pregnancy. Between 2 and 10 percent of expectant mothers develop this condition, usually around the 24th week of pregnancy. Most women who develop gestational diabetes do not remain diabetic after the baby is born. Once you have had gestational diabetes you are at higher risk of getting it again during your future pregnancies and for developing diabetes later in life. What is Gestational Diabetes? There are many kinds of diabetes, but to put it simply, it means that you have abnormally high levels of sugar in your blood. It affects how your cells use sugar, also known as glucose, which is your body’s main fuel. When you eat, your digestive system breaks down most of your food into glucose which then enters your bloodstream. With the help of insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas, your cells use the glucose to fuel your body. However, if your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or doesn’t accept the insulin then too much glucose stays in your blood stream instead of moving into the cells and getting converted into energy. During pregnancy, the placenta that connects your baby to your blood supply produces high levels of various hormones. Almost all of these hormones impair the action of insulin in your cells, which raises your blood sugar. As your baby grows, the placenta produces more and more insulin blocking hormones. In gestational diabetes, the abnormally high levels of blood sugar can affect the growth and health of your baby. What are the Symptoms? Most women will not experience noticeable symptoms of gestational diabetes, but some will feel excessively thirsty and urinate more frequently. How Will I Know if I Have Gestational Diabetes? Testing for gestational diabetes is a part of your regu Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

What Is Gestational Diabetes?

What Is Gestational Diabetes?

What is Gestational Diabetes? In reality, that is a very controversial question. Research in this area does not support current practices. This article is an overview of current practices for Gestational Diabetes. See Treatment for Gestational Diabetes to learn more about the evidence-based view of GD. During digestion, the body breaks down carbohydrates from foods such as bread, pasta, vegetables, fruits and dairy products into various sugar molecules. One of these sugar molecules is glucose, a main source of energy. Glucose is absorbed directly into the bloodstream after eating, but it can't enter cells without the help of insulin. The pancreas, a gland located just behind the stomach, produces insulin continuously. When blood sugar increases after eating, insulin production also increases. The extra insulin "unlocks" cells to more sugar, which provides the body with energy and helps maintain a normal level of sugar in the blood. During pregnancy, the placenta produces hormones to sustain the pregnancy. These hormones make cells more resistant to insulin. As the placenta grows larger in the second and third trimesters, it secretes more of these hormones, making it even harder for insulin to do its job. Normally, the pancreas responds by producing enough extra insulin to overcome this resistance. When the pancreas can't keep up, too little glucose gets into the cells and too much stays in the blood. This is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually develops during the second trimester, sometimes as early as the 20th week, but often not until later in the pregnancy. Return to Top of What is Gestational Diabetes? Risk factors for gestational diabetes include: MATERNAL AGE OVER 25 FAMILY HISTORY OF DIABETES OR PRE-DIABETES EXCESS WEIGHT/BMI HISTORY OF POLY Continue reading >>

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