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Gestational Diabetes Pamphlet

Handouts, Web Resources

Handouts, Web Resources

Please read this first, to help you find what you want! To search this page use "ctrl" + "f" on pc or command + f on mac and input your search word. For health education handouts and websites, see below. For links to user manuals for "Diabetes products" - click here . For "More Help!" for topics like diabetes supplies coverage, foot care, psychosocial counseling and more, click here . For in-person classes in the Calgary area on diabetes, weight, osteoporosis and more, call the Alberta Healthy Living Program 403-943-2584 and visit your Primary Care Network's website or call Health Link at 811. For more information, please review below and consider visiting My Health Alberta . For your safety, the information in these handouts and resources should be reviewed with your healthcare provider. To add March 2017: Insulin Pen Smart Cap Added:Diabetes: Percent Carbohyrate in Foods For a printable list ofDiabetes Resources for Patients (diabetes question-lines, classes, urgent help, routine 1:1 care) click here . South Asian CDA Food and Nutrition Tools Alberta Health Services Nutrition Resources for diabetes can be downloaded and ordered at Nutrition resources online . Login to the resource order page with id: NFSpublic and password: 2014nfs03. Search the catalog for handouts of topics. Click on the picture of the handout you want, then click the printer icon. Many handouts can be downloaded or printed. Some handouts are indicated for RD use only and would need to be ordered. Your dietitian and diabetes team will help you decide how to match insulin to carbohydrate. This usually includes counting grams of carbohydrate. The following are some of the many tools available for determining the carbohydrate content of foods. Labels: Subtract the grams of fibre from the grams of carb Continue reading >>

Resources

Resources

Resources for your patients with type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a complex disorder. To help our patients understand their diabetes we have designed some resources to help. Please print them off for your own use. If you would like to order them e-mail [email protected] Video resources promoting health: Shop for your life 'Shop for your life', a story which takes a fun approach to health promotion. When Annie and Eddie find themselves on a 'dream'shopping trip with their parents, they get more than they bargain for. The events of their trip highlight the need to understand portion size and interpret labels. 'Shop for your life'is a lively, entertaining way to gain some vital information about the fat, sugar and fibre in our diet. Stay in Touch 'Stay in Touch', the story of 13 year old Sam whose body has just had enough of his lifestyle and decides to tell him all about it by sending him text messages. An A4 sheet covering what is type 2 diabetes, the signs and symptoms and ways to prevent or control it by offering healthy lifestyle ideas, such as healthy eating and exercise. Download Here An A4 sheet covering what is type 2 diabetes, the signs and symptoms and ways to prevent or control it by offering healthy lifestyle ideas, such as healthy eating and exercise. Download Here An A4 sheet explaining what type 2 diabetes is, the signs and symptoms, potential complications when uncontrolled and ways to control it. Download Here A pamphlet explaining what type 2 diabetes is, the signs and symptoms, potential complications when uncontrolled and ways to control it. Download Here A pamphlet explaining what type 2 diabetes is, the signs and symptoms, potential complications when uncontrolled and ways to control it. Download Here A pamphlet explaining what type 2 diabetes is, t Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a specific type of diabetes that only occurs during pregnancy. It is temporary and goes away after the birth of your baby. Approximately one in 20 pregnant women will develop gestational diabetes, usually between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can have significant effects for both you and your baby if not well controlled. You have an increased risk of developing GDM if you: are from certain ethnic backgrounds Indigenous Australian, Torres Strait Islander, Indian, Vietnamese, Chinese, Middle Eastern, Polynesian or Melanesian have previously had difficulty carrying a pregnancy to term have previously birthed a baby weighing more than 4 kg. Following a healthy diet, having a healthy weight gain during pregnancy and exercising regularly will help to minimise your risk of developing GDM . All pregnant women are now screened for GDM . This involves an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy where a blood test is taken before, and two hours after, a sugary drink. This test may be performed earlier in your pregnancy if there is a clinical reason to do so. The aim of treatment is to maintain your blood glucose levels (BGL) within a normal range for the rest of your pregnancy. For most women this can be achieved by: following a healthy dieta dietitian or diabetes educator will give you information to assist you with this having a healthy weight gain during pregnancy. Using the Mater personalised pregnancy weight tracker located in your Healthy eating during pregnancy booklet, provided at your first antenatal clinic, visit will help you monitor this. monitoring your blood glucose levels every day, as instructed. Approximately one in 10 women with GDM will require insulin injections during p Continue reading >>

Educational Materials For Your Patients

Educational Materials For Your Patients

Curated for the diabetes care partner, this set provides basic information about diabetes, clarifies the partner's role in caring for someone with the disease, and explains the importance of taking good care of themselves. Continue reading >>

Patient Education Materials

Patient Education Materials

NEW! Introducing 40 Educational Handouts on Using Insulin Low Literacy and Very Low Literacy Versions Available ACU and the Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation announce the release of 40 educational handouts for patients who are starting insulin. Each handout is written in easy to understand language with simple illustrations. The handouts are available in both English and Spanish and two literacy levels: low literacy and very low literacy. The handouts are free to download and distribute. Using Insulin to Treat Your Diabetes: What It Means for You English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) About Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Insulin Syringes and Pens English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Injecting Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Needle Safety English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Managing Daily Doses of Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Measuring Your Blood Sugar English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Tracking Blood Sugar Results English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Diet and Exercise English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Travel Tips English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (P Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diabetes New Zealand

Gestational Diabetes Diabetes New Zealand

What can gestational diabetes do to me and my child? An increased chance of needing a caesarean section to deliver your baby An increased chance of developing HOP (toxaemia or pregnancy induced hypertension and protein in the urine) An increased chance of getting urinary tract infections Being very fat and large at birth. Babies who are too large or fat at birth have a much higher risk of developing serious problems following their birth Having their shoulders dislocated during the birth process (because they are too large to fit well through the birth canal) Having a serious low blood glucose level soon after birth. This can happen because before being born your baby had been getting a very high level of glucose out of your blood (across the placenta). The baby had adjusted to this high glucose level by making high levels of its own insulin. When the placenta separates after birth this high level of glucose (from you) suddenly stops. The baby still has very high levels of its own insulin and this can cause its blood glucose to fall too low. Respiratory distress syndrome (this can be quite dangerous) Am I at risk of developing gestational diabetes? If you have one or more of the following factors you are more likely to develop gestational diabetes: Having a family history of type 2 diabetes in a close relative (parents or brothers and sisters) Having gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy If you have had a previous stillbirth or spontaneous miscarriage If youve had a previous large baby (greater than 4 kilos ) If you have a history of pregnancy-induced high blood pressure, urinary tract infections, or polyhydramnious (too much amniotic fluid) What can be done about gestational diabetes? In most cases, gestational diabetes is able to be managed by diet and exercis Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

> Home > The Facts > Gestational Diabetes The majority of healthy women can expect to have an uncomplicated pregnancy, to begin labour naturally and to give birth to a healthy baby. However, the increasing medicalisation of both pregnancy and birth has resulted in huge changes in womens experience of having a baby. Women are often unaware that they have the right to be given information on the risks and benefits of every procedure and test they are asked to undergo during pregnancy and to choose whether or not they will have it. Over the past few decades pregnancy has become a nine-month obstacle race in which women are faced with making decisions about an increasing number of tests and procedures. Screening for gestational diabetes is one of them. This pamphlet provides you with evidence-based information about gestational diabetes (GDM). Information in the pamphlet covers: The disadvantages of having a single test An outline of the differing opinions on gestational diabetes Before you give consent to being screened or tested for gestational diabetes it is important that you are aware of and understand the risks, benefits and possible consequences of the tests you are being encouraged to undergo. While screening for gestational diabetes has become a routine part of pregnancy care, the definition of this condition has recently been widened and there is now a risk of many pregnant women being overdiagnosed and having their birth managed in a way that would not have occurred had they not been labelled as having gestational diabetes. Remember, you have the right to choose whether or not to be tested for gestational diabetes. If you would like to receive a copy of our pamphlet a single copy is available free of charge or wish to order copies for your practice, then please Continue reading >>

Arabic

Arabic

Summary: It is important to look after diabetes for long-term health. Diabetes is a condition which, over time, may cause damage to the bodys organs, blood vessels and nerves. If diabetes is well managed and general health is taken care of, the risk of diabetes-related complications is reduced. This fact sheet provides information on diabetes-related complications including the most common diabetes-related complications and tips to maintain good health. Summary: This fact sheet provides general information and facts about type 1 and 2 diabetes, their common symptoms, causes and treatment. It also covers gestational diabetes. It includes frequently asked questions about diabetes and information about diabetes and travelling, diabetes and driving and diabetes complications and driving. Summary: Type 1 diabetes affects about 10-15% of all people living with diabetes. It occurs when the pancreas cant produce insulin. This happens because the cells that make the insulin (beta cells) have been destroyed by the bodys own immune system. Summary: Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. It affects 80-90% of all people living with diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas cant make enough insulin and the bodys cells cant respond properly to the insulin that is made. This leads to high blood glucose levels. Summary: Basic information on type 2 Diabetes including symptoms and prevention This resource has been reviewed in the last 3 years and complies with the Health Translation Directory editorial guidelines and collection policy. The Health Translations Directory is always improving The Centre for Culture, Ethnicity and Health has been contracted to manage and improve Health Translations. We are regularly reviewing our collection and improving your experience Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gestational Diabetes - Women And Newborn Health Library (wnhl) - Libguides At King Edward Memorial Hospital

Diabetes And Gestational Diabetes - Women And Newborn Health Library (wnhl) - Libguides At King Edward Memorial Hospital

Women and Newborn Health Library (WNHL): Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes A guide to consumer health information in the areas of women's and newborn health. Gestational diabetes : your survival guide to diabetes in pregnancy by Paul Grant A diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy can be stressful and overwhelming and there are often more questions than answers, from 'why me'? to 'what's safe to eat?' to what's going to happen to my baby'? Diabetes is the fastest growing chronic disease in Australia. It is an alarming reality, there are many things you can do to take charge of your own health. Regular exercise and eating a balanced diet plays an integrel role in managing your diabetes. Full of delicious recipes, helful dietary information and lifestyle tips, this collection was created especially for people living with diabetes. Gestational Diabetes by American Diabetes Association Staff (Created by) Pregnancy, birth and your baby : a guide to your care with King Edward Memorial Hospital This booklet is designed to give you information about the care you will receive with us at KEMH. Keep it with you throughout your pregnancy and following the birth of your baby as it contains lots of information and advice you might find useful. The following is a selection of information available online. Click the link to go to the pamphlet. Having a Healthy baby : a guide to planning and managing pregnancy for women with type 1 diabetes This booklet is for women with type 1 diabetes who are planning a pregnancy now or in the future. It provides information on preparing for pregnancy, as well as tips on how to manage diabetes during pregnancy and once the baby is born. Having a healthy baby: a guide to planning and managing pregnancy for women with type 2 diabetes This booklet is for wom Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

The following information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice or used to alter medical therapy. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs. Gestational diabetes (sometimes referred to as GDM) is a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy and usually goes away after the baby is born. It is diagnosed when higher than normal blood glucose levels first appear during pregnancy. Between 5% and 8% of pregnant women will develop gestational diabetes and this usually occurs around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. All women should be tested for gestational diabetes by taking a special blood test. Women who have one or more of the risk factors listed below are advised to have a diabetes test when pregnancy is confirmed then again at 24 weeks if diabetes was not detected in early pregnancy. While maternal blood glucose levels usually return to normal after birth, there is an increased risk for the mother developing type 2 diabetes in the future. The baby may also be at risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. You are at risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: are over 30 years of age have a family history of type 2 diabetes are overweight are from an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background are from a Vietnamese, Chinese, middle eastern, Polynesian or Melanesian background have had gestational diabetes during previous pregnancies. In pregnancy, the placenta produces hormones that help the baby to grow and develop. These hormones also block the action of the mother’s insulin. This is called insulin resistance. Because of this insulin resistance, the need for insulin in pregnancy is 2 or 3 times higher than normal. If the body is unable to pr Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

PDF Format Gestational Diabetes What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes mellitus that develops in women for the first time during pregnancy. Some women found to have gestational diabetes actually may have had mild diabetes before pregnancy that was not diagnosed. What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus (also called "diabetes") is a condition that causes high levels of glucose in the blood (see the FAQ Diabetes and Women). Glucose is a sugar that is the body’s main source of energy. Health problems can occur when glucose levels are too high. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is caused by a change in the way a woman’s body responds to insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is a hormone. It moves glucose out of the blood and into the body’s cells where it can be turned into energy. During pregnancy, a woman’s cells naturally become slightly more resistant to insulin’s effects. This change is designed to increase the mother’s blood glucose level to make more nutrients available to the baby. The mother’s body makes more insulin to keep the blood glucose level normal. In a small number of women, even this increase is not enough to keep their blood glucose levels in the normal range. As a result, they develop gestational diabetes. Will I be tested for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women are screened for gestational diabetes. You may be asked about your medical history and risk factors or you may have a blood test to measure the level of glucose in your blood. This test usually is done between 24 weeks and 28 weeks of pregnancy. It may be done earlier if you have risk factors. If I develop gestational diabetes, will I always have diabetes mellitus? For most women, gestational diabetes goes away after childbirth. How Continue reading >>

Diabetes Nz: Pamphlets, Booklets, Support + Advice

Diabetes Nz: Pamphlets, Booklets, Support + Advice

Diabetes NZ: Pamphlets, Booklets, Support + Advice Carers NZ surveys indicate that many of New Zealands family carers have diabetes, or support someone who do. If this is the case for you, Diabetes NZ and your local diabetes service want to help you build confidence, and provide back-up and support as you learn how to live well with diabetes. Visit the Diabetes NZ website for information about Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and how to live with diabetes. The site includes advice about food and nutrition, medication, sexual health, and many other topics of interest to those who have diabetes and their families. We like the Diabetes NZ Disaster Kit , with lots of tips to prepare for an emergency. People who have diabetes need to be especially prepared for the unexpected, as they need appropriate food, medication and other supplies to manage their condition if they need to leave home suddenly. At the website you can also learn about Diabetes NZs magazine, and download articles from past issues. Youll find subscription details at the site. Listen to Ann Privet of the Pharmacy Guild talking about support and services available from your local pharmacist and how to manage medications at home. Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas no longer produces insulin. The body needs insulin to use sugar for energy. Approximately 10 per cent of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body does not effectively use the insulin that is produced. 90 per cent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a temporary condition that occurs during pregnancy. It affects approximately 3.5 per cent of all pregnancies and involves an increased risk of developing diabetes for both mother and child. If left untreated or improperly managed, diabetes can result in a variety of complications, including: The first step in avoiding the onset of these complications is recognizing the risk factors, as well as signs and symptoms that may indicate you have diabetes. Careful management of diabetes, for those living with it, can delay or even prevent complications. Risk factors for developing diabetes include the following: A member of a high-risk ethnic group (Aboriginal, Hispanic, Asian, South Asian or African descent) Overweight (especially if you carry most of your weight around your middle) A parent, brother or sister with diabetes Health complications that are associated with diabetes (see above under "Is diabetes serious?") Given birth to a baby that weighed more than 4 kg (9 lb) at birth Had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) High cholesterol or other fats in the blood Having been diagnosed with any of the following: Acanthosis nigricans (darkened patches of skin) Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet Trouble getting or maintaining an erection It is important to recognize, however, that ma Continue reading >>

Cdapp Sweet Success > Resources > Free Patient Education Material

Cdapp Sweet Success > Resources > Free Patient Education Material

Eating Well to Keep Your Blood Sugar Normal - This pamphlet encourages eating meals low in sugar/carbohydrates and at regular times. It includes cooking tips and examples of high fiber foods. Print in landscape orientation, front to back, clip on the "short edge". Eating Well to Keep Your Blood Sugar Normal/Comiendo Bien Para Mantener Normal el Azcar en la Sangre - Spanish/English Food Guide - This brochure presents a colorful pictorial of the different food groups with a place for writing a personalized meal plan. Drawings of culturally appropriate food items are labeled along with portion sizes. Food groups are color coded for easy reference. Fruits and vegetables rich in vitamin C and A are coded for easy reference. A table of foods which raise blood sugar and should be avoided is also provided Print in portrait orientation, front to back. Food Guide - Vietnamese (Color) **The Vietnamese Food Guide was last updated on 3/05 My Meal Plan - This useful tool assists in providing personalized meal plans for your patient. The chart allows individualized meal and snack examples to be listed in the correct portions for each food group. This is an excellent tool for a wide range of literacy skills. This chart is available in English and Spanish. Print in landscape orientation, front to back, clip on the "short edge". My Meal Plan/Mi Plan de Comidas - Spanish Postpartum Nutrition (My Baby has Been Born...) - This easy to read brochure helps a woman maintain a healthy life style after delivery. Includes information on steps to take to maintain a healthy weight, eating less fat, and how to read a label. Print in landscape orientation, front to back, clip on the "short edge". Post Partum Nutrition/My Baby Has Been Born What do I Eat Now?/ Mi Beb ha nacido, Wue Hago hora Para Pre Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Gdmâ Mealâ Plans

Common Questions About Gdmâ Mealâ Plans

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S Which foods are considered carbohydrates? For your meal plan, only a few types of foods are counted as carbs — starches, fruits, dairy, and non-starchy vegetables. The Food Finder chart on page 3 gives examples and portion sizes for these types of foods. Should I aim for a very low carb diet — like the Atkins diet? No. You (and your baby) need carbohydrates to stay healthy. Follow your meal plan to know when and how much carbohydrate to include in your meals and snacks. Do I need to count calories? It depends. Some women with GDM need to count calories, but many others don’t. Your meal plan will list all of the targets you need to aim for — and your healthcare provider can answer any questions. How do I know if my eating plan is working to control my GDM? A healthcare provider will show you how to test your blood glucose several times a day. Your testing results will show how well your GDM is controlled and whether your treatment should be adjusted. You’ll also be checked during your regular prenatal visits. Use the Food Finder meal planner to help you control your GDM, nourish your growing baby, and keep you feeling good. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) Meal Plan Why do I need a GDM meal plan? If you have gestational [je-STEY-shuhn-uhl] diabetes mellitus (GDM), you and your developing baby are likely to have high blood glucose (too much glucose — or “sugarâ€â€” in the blood). This can cause problems for both of you during the pregnancy, during delivery, and in the years to come. Following a meal plan is one of the most important ways to help control your blood glucose and lower health risks. Your healthcare provider will help you decide on a Continue reading >>

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