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Gestational Diabetes Numbers Dropping

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

How Can I Keep My Blood Sugar From Dropping While I Sleep?

How Can I Keep My Blood Sugar From Dropping While I Sleep?

Low blood glucose can happen at any time of day. But it may be more likely to happen during sleep, when you go for several hours without eating. It's also more of a risk early in your treatment, as your body adjusts to your new insulin regimen. Here are a few steps you can take to help prevent low blood glucose during the night. Check blood glucose at bedtime. You need to make sure that your blood glucose is high enough to sustain you through the hours you're asleep. Most children and teens should aim for a bedtime blood glucose of over 100 mg/dL. If you hit this bedtime target, you can go to sleep as usual. If bedtime blood glucose is less than 100 mg/dL: Have a nighttime snack. (If a snack is already part of your daily schedule, add some carbohydrate to the snack.) Recheck your blood glucose in one to two hours. You can go to sleep after the snack -- you'll just need to wake up to recheck. Successful diabetes treatment is a balancing act between medications and therapies that lower blood sugar on one hand, and our intake of food on the other hand. Once balanced, it works pretty well, but sometimes getting that balance right is quite a trick. If you are going low in your sleep, we haven’t figured out that magic balance yet (or something has changed—maybe you lost weight or are eating less). Low blood sugar is always dangerous, but especially at night. You need to hook up with your medical team right away. In the meantime, eat a snack at bedtime as anti-low insurance. Half a peanut butter sandwich is a good choice. Unless you don’t like peanut butter. You want something that is somewhat high-carb, but also high in fat so that it lasts a long time. Chocolate is another good choice, except that your spouse will refuse to believe that it’s “medicine.” But an ev Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Placenta Deterioration

Gestational Diabetes Placenta Deterioration

The gestational diabetes placenta The placenta is the organ between the baby and mother which is responsible for providing oxygen and nutrients to the baby through the blood flow in the umbilical cord and removing waste and carbon dioxide from the baby, back to the mother. As we know, gestational diabetes increases the amount of glucose flowing through the bloodstream to the baby but the gestational diabetes placenta may also have growth, structural and functional differences to that of a non-diabetic mother: In diabetes, the placenta undergoes a variety of structural and functional changes (rev. in1–3). Their nature and extent depend on a range of variables including the quality of glycemic control achieved during the critical periods in placental development, the modality of treatment, and the time period of severe departures from excellent metabolic control of a non-diabetic environment. Placental structure and function can be changed as a result of maternal diabetes. The nature and extent of these changes depend on the type of diabetes and on the gestational period. Consequences of gestational and pregestational diabetes on placental function and birth weight Gestational diabetes placenta issues Having gestational diabetes means that we are at a higher risk of having placenta issues, although other factors can also cause placenta issues such as other types of diabetes, hypertension, anaemia, blood clotting disorders, smoking and drug abuse during pregnancy. Many terms may be used for gestational diabetes placenta issues such as placenta deterioration, placenta insufficiency, placenta failure, placenta dysfunction, premature ageing, calcification and impaired placenta function. Gestational diabetes placenta issues can occur when there are problems with blood flow t Continue reading >>

Some Of You Recommend Testing Blood Sugar Levels At 2 Hours Instead Of One Why?

Some Of You Recommend Testing Blood Sugar Levels At 2 Hours Instead Of One Why?

some of you recommend testing blood sugar levels at 2 hours instead of one why? D.D. Family type 2 since May 2011 A1C then was 13.2 some of you recommend testing blood sugar levels at 2 hours instead of one why? Explain this to me please. I have noticed some of you..much more experienced in diabetes than me...often recommend testing two hours after eating a meal....rather than one. Ok, I peak out at one hour..at two my blood sugar levels are dropping. I thought this was almost standard for most diabetics. I want to know how high a meal caused me to spike. If I go over 140 that meal just became taboo. If it went over 120 then it became a marginal meal..only to be eaten when my numbers are running on the low side. So...what am I missing here? Why test two hours later? To me it seems the one hour mark is far more critical..unless your concerned that you bs level is still rising. I can't think of a single time that has happened to me. For the first six months after diagnoses I test both at the one hour and two hour mark.....but dropped the two hour test because it was always lower. So...have I missed something? 2000 mg Metformin,28 units Lantus, Low carbohydrate diet 5 foot 8..150 pounds last five years A1C's between 4.8 and 6.3...usually 5.5 My understanding (from members of several forums, plus two doctors) is that our BG is supposed to be back very close to the pre-meal level at 2 hours. So this tells us how well our bodies are dealing with the food we've just consumed. When I first started testing, my 2 hour numbers were invariably higher than the 1 hour numbers. As I persevered with LCHF and got my numbers to remain within a fairly narrow range at all times, my 2 hour numbers finally dropped below the 1 hour numbers. Like you, I like to know how high my numbers go whe Continue reading >>

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Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Untreated, high blood sugar can cause many problems and future complications. Recognizing signs of high blood sugar levels and knowing how to lower them can help you prevent these complications and increase the quality and length of your life. Topics covered (click to jump to specific section) High blood sugar level symptoms and signs Symptoms of high blood sugar include: Increased thirst Tired all the time Irritability Increased hunger Urinating a lot Dry mouth Blurred vision Severe high blood sugar can lead to nausea and fruity smelling breath The signs and symptoms for high blood sugar are the same for both type 1 and type 2. Signs usually show up quicker in those who have type 1 because of the nature of their diabetes. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that causes the body to stop making insulin altogether. Type 2 is caused by lifestyle factors when the body eventually stops responding to insulin, which causes the sugar to increase slowly. People with type 2 can live longer without any symptoms creeping because their body is still making enough insulin to help control it a little bit. What causes the blood sugar levels go to high? Our bodies need sugar to make energy for the cells. Without it, we cannot do basic functions. When we eat foods with glucose, insulin pairs with it to allow it to enter into the cell wall. If the insulin is not there, then the glucose molecule can’t get through the wall and cannot be used. The extra glucose hangs out in the bloodstream which is literally high blood sugar. The lack of insulin can be caused by two different things. First, you can have decreased insulin resistance which means that your insulin doesn’t react the way that it is supposed to. It doesn’t partner with glucose to be used as fuel. Secondly, you can have no insuli Continue reading >>

Numbers Dropping At 34 Weeks??

Numbers Dropping At 34 Weeks??

Anyone else have this? I've seen some posts that say after 36 weeks your number can start to level out but I'm only 34. The past few days my numbers have been steadily getting lower and lower. I don't see my doctor until Monday! I just had a reading after one hour of 5.3 after a bowl of pasta and a glass of milk. I feel the same way at 32 weeks. I heard around this time is when they start getting higher, but mine are getting lower! I've been able to add more carbs to my meals and still make it well under the number I need to be at! Ok, so I was diagnosed with GD at 26 weeks and I had a horrible time managing my levels. Any carb would give me high readings. Now I am 30 weeks and I noticed I could tolerate more carbs. I just tested this out. I ate McDonald's. I had a double cheeseburger and a small order of fries and got a 125. I'm supposed to be under 130 after one hour. This worries me because I've read that it could be a sign that the placenta insufficiency. I don't know if I should be happy or worried. I'm having the opposite problem. My numbers started going up at 34 weeks and I'm eating the exact same things I've been eating. So frustrating! I've had to up my insulin for fasting numbers as well. At 35w2d, I'm hoping I'll see a drop in my numbers soon. Mine started to level off and lower there. I asked my doctor because I was worried about premature placental failure, but my doctor was really not concerned about it, especially considering my numbers have always been good and diet controlled. I am 35 weeks now and not as concerned with measuring my levels. I am just eating carefully for the most part, and will continue to do so, but I think in part I feel better too and not as worried, which is making things better. I was told at my last appointment that if my number Continue reading >>

Blood Sugars Dropping At 31 Weeks

Blood Sugars Dropping At 31 Weeks

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Has anyone come across blood sugars difficult to keep up, as opposed to down! I'm 31 weeks pregnant and been insulin resistant up until now, and over the last 3 days have had to reduce my insulin dramatically. I'm eating real carbs again and still getting hypos. Please any advise would be great. I was admitted to hospital this weekend but they don't know what to do, I have the diabetic clinic scan and baby doctor in the morning. Any advise would be great from actual diabetics would be super helpful though Hi you need to speak to your obs/diabetic team about how much you have had to reduce your insulin by. It can be a sign that the placenta isn't working properly and they will scan you and do Doppler tests and check the blood flow and growth etc. they might strap you up for continuous monitoring of heart rate for a while. I know as I had pre eclampsia first pregnancy and sugars dropped and second pregnancy with twins my sugars dropped and they decided they needed to come out (born last month). Have you retested your basal rates have they changed or is it just your carb ratio? What were you admitted for? Assume on the ante natal ward? I've been admitted due to not being able to keep my sugars up and constantly having hypos. My basal rates have also dropped from 28 units to 20, and my carb ratio has dropped by 20% or more. I've had the heart monitors on over the weekend and they say baby is happy. During one of the monitoring sessions I had a hypo my blood sugar went from 8- 3.4 in 30 mins her movements increased dramatically and her heart rate was up and down up to 180 and down 110. They kept saying it was normal. Once my blood sugars evened out she cal Continue reading >>

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Fetal Monitoring, Gestational Diabetes, Integrative Medicine, Pregnancy and Birth, Weight Management What is self blood glucose monitoring? Once you are diagnosed as having gestational diabetes, you and your health care providers will want to know more about your day-to-day blood sugar levels. It is important to know how your exercise habits and eating patterns affect your blood sugars. Also, as your pregnancy progresses, the placenta will release more of the hormones that work against insulin. Testing your blood sugar level at important times during the day will help determine if proper diet and weight gain have kept blood sugar levels normal or if extra insulin is needed to help keep the fetus protected. Self blood glucose monitoring is done by using a special device to obtain a drop of your blood and test it for your blood sugar level. Your doctor or other health care provider will explain the procedure to you. Make sure that you are shown how to do the testing before attempting it on your own. Some items you may use to monitor your blood sugar levels are: Lancet–a disposable, sharp needle-like sticker for pricking the finger to obtain a drop of blood. Lancet device–a springloaded finger sticking device. Test strip–a chemically treated strip to which a drop of blood is applied. Color chart–a chart used to compare against the color on the test strip for blood sugar level. Glucose meter–a device which “reads” the test strip and gives you a digital number value. Your health care provider can advise you where to obtain the self-monitoring equipment in your area. You may want to inquire if any places rent or loan glucose meters, since it is likely you won't be needing it after your baby is born. How often and when should I test? You may need to test your blo Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

only happens during pregnancy. It means you have high blood sugar levels, but those levels were normal before you were pregnant. If you have it, you can still have a healthy baby with help from your doctor and by doing simple things to manage your blood sugar, also called blood glucose. After your baby is born, gestational diabetes usually goes away. Gestational diabetes makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, but it won’t definitely happen. During pregnancy, the placenta makes hormones that can lead to a buildup of glucose in your blood. Usually, your pancreas can make enough insulin to handle that. If not, your blood sugar levels will rise and can cause gestational diabetes. It affects between 2% and 10% of pregnancies each year. You are more likely to get gestational diabetes if you: Were overweight before you got pregnant Are African-American, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American Have high blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diabetes Have a family history of diabetes Have had gestational diabetes before Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large baby before (greater than 9 pounds) Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or had certain birth defects Gestational diabetes usually happens in the second half of pregnancy. Your doctor will check to see if you have gestational diabetes between weeks 24 and 28 of your pregnancy. Your doctor may test sooner if you're at high risk. To test for gestational diabetes, you will quickly drink a sugary drink. This will raise your blood sugar levels. An hour later, you’ll take a blood test to see how your body handled all that sugar. If the results show that your blood sugar is higher than a certain cutoff (anywhere from 130 milligrams per deciliter [mg/dL] or hig Continue reading >>

Bump & Gestational Diabetes Update: Week 35

Bump & Gestational Diabetes Update: Week 35

Bump & Gestational Diabetes Update: Week 35 Clothes:I feel like I keep recycling the same few outfits. The problem is that the longer I go without buying any maternity clothes, the more of a waste it seems to buy them now. Body changes: A growing belly. And my belly button is looking really funky. Although, it didnt pop out with Max and I dont think itll pop this time either. Symptoms:Im feeling soooo uncomfortable andover it at this point. This is going to be an excruciatingly long month. Like, in my mind, I want Bean to cook as long as she needs. But at the same time, I really want her to choose an early exit (anytime after 37 weeks). Please. Food cravings: Im a sucker for sour candy, which I havent had any of since I got diagnosed with GD. However,I can have ice cream (something about the protein/fat/carb ratio) so Ive been trying to satisfy my sweet tooth cravings with that. Sleep: Sleep sucks. Especially when you cant fall asleep, wake up 2-3x to pee when you finally do sleep, get woken up by Max in the wee hours of the morning because hes going through a sleep regression, and then said toddler refuses to go back to sleep. 1. Major breakthrough with potty training Max ! We were able to go on two separate outings (the park and a restaurant) with zero mistakes! Mr. C and I tend to stress out (always only in retrospect,unnecessarily) and think the worst will happen. Mr. C tookMax to pee about every 30 minutes and Max always obliged. I seriously couldnt be happier. Ive been reading that a lot of potty regressions occur when a new baby comes along. I fully expect that may happen but, at least, Max will have the foundation in place. sitting outside the restaurant because toddlers get antsy 2. I had a growth scan and Bean grew a whopping 14oz in two weeks! She is still t Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Topic Overview When you have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range. If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others when they need help. There are many su Continue reading >>

What’s The Connection Between Hypoglycemia And Pregnancy?

What’s The Connection Between Hypoglycemia And Pregnancy?

Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose, or blood sugar, from the blood into the body’s cells, where it’s then stored or used for energy. During pregnancy, your body produces more insulin to help your baby grow. At the same time, pregnancy can also make you more resistant to insulin. This is why many women develop diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). Though high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is more common in pregnancy, the changes in your body during pregnancy and how you react to insulin can also make your blood sugar drop dangerously low. That causes a condition called hypoglycemia. A blood sugar reading of less than 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia during pregnancy happens most often in women with diabetes. Persistent hypoglycemia in pregnant women without diabetes is rare. Sugar levels can dip too low during pregnancy when any of the following occur: You don’t eat frequently enough or the right kinds of foods to stabilize blood sugar levels. Regardless of how much or how often you eat, your baby will continue siphoning glucose from your body. Your body is usually good at compensating for this. You exercise excessively, using up glucose. If there isn’t enough glucose in your body or you don’t replenish it with some carbs, you may become hypoglycemic. Your diabetes medication doses are too effective at lowering blood sugar and need to be modified. This is the most common reason for hypoglycemia during pregnancy. Hypoglycemia and diabetes Hypoglycemia can occur in pregnant women without diabetes, but it’s much more likely to be seen in women taking insulin. Each of the following types of diabetes puts you at a higher risk for hypoglycemia episodes: The symptoms of hypoglycemia are generally the same in Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar

Gestational Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar

Gestational Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar Gestational Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar Women who take insulin shots or take the medicine glyburide are at risk for low blood sugar levels. Most women with gestational diabetes do not have problems with low blood sugar ( hypoglycemia ). If your blood sugar (glucose) drops very low, make sure to get treated immediately so that neither you nor your baby is harmed. Low blood sugar occurs when the sugar level in the blood drops below what the body needs to function normally. Women who take insulin may get low blood sugar if they don't eat enough food, skip meals, exercise more than usual, or take too much insulin. These steps can help you avoid a life-threatening emergency from low blood sugar: Test your blood sugar often so that you don't have to guess when your blood sugar is low. Know the signs of low blood sugar (sweating, shakiness, hunger, blurred vision, and dizziness). The best treatment for low blood sugar is to eat quick-sugar foods . Liquids will raise your blood sugar faster than solid foods. Keep the list of quick-sugar foods in a convenient place. Wait 10 to 15 minutes after eating the quick-sugar food, and, if possible, check your blood sugar again. Keep some hard candy, raisins, or other sugary foods with you at all times. Eat some at the first sign of low blood sugar. Check your blood sugar before getting in a car. And don't drive if your blood sugar level is less than 70 mg/dL. Teach your friends and coworkers what to do if your blood sugar is very low. What is a low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) emergency? Low blood sugar means that the level of sugar in your blood has dropped below what your body needs to function normally. Most women with gestational diabetes do not have problems with low blood Continue reading >>

37 Weeks Pregnant With Gestational Diabetes

37 Weeks Pregnant With Gestational Diabetes

By week 37 of pregnancy, a woman has likely been managing her gestational diabetes for about nine weeks. Blood tests for the condition are performed at the beginning of the third trimester, around 28 weeks. Although gestational diabetes does place women in a higher pregnancy risk category, the condition can be managed with careful vigilance. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says that between two and 10 percent of women are diagnosed with gestational diabetes annually. The ACOG defines gestational diabetes as excess levels of glucose in the blood. Excess glucose occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin to convert glucose into energy. The condition comes and goes with pregnancy. Women who develop gestational diabetes with one pregnancy are more likely to develop it in subsequent pregnancies. The ACOG says that up to one half of them will develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Diet, exercise and, occasionally, medication are key to gestational diabetes control. Patients need to avoid refined carbohydrates, sugar and caffeine and maintain a regimen of either swimming, walking or prenatal yoga. Insulin shots are sometimes necessary. If gestational diabetes is not controlled, serious complications may occur. They include premature birth; preeclampsia, or abnormally high maternal blood pressure; respiratory distress syndrome, or difficulties with baby’s breathing at birth; birth defects; and macrosomia, or an extremely large baby. According to Midwifery Today, the baby can go into diabetic shock and die during birth in cases of improper disease management. By 37 weeks, women with gestational diabetes will be checked weekly. Because of the risks of preeclampsia and macrosomia, these women have a slightly higher chance of delivering their ba Continue reading >>

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