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Gestational Diabetes - Low Number At Night But High Fasting Number

How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes And High Fasting Levels?

How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes And High Fasting Levels?

Home / Gestational Diabetes / How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes and High fasting levels? How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes? Some ladies find it helps to take a big glass of water to bed with them so that. They can also drink when waking to go to the bathroom in the nighttime. How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes? A high-fat meal such as takeaway food can also cause higher blood sugar levels. And so eat a well paired evening meal is important. How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes The key to stabilizing blood sugar levels is to eat small amounts, often. We obviously cannot do this throughout the night, but if you eat your evening meal early and do not eat again until breakfast the following day, it can be an extremely long time to go without eating. How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes? Likewise, if you eat a large meal just before going to bed, this too can have a detrimental effect on your fasting levels. Dehydration will cause higher blood sugar levels. Water helps to flush excess sugar from the body, and so it is important to stay well hydrated. Some ladies find it helps to take a big glass of water to bed with them, So that they can also drink when waking to go to the bathroom in the nighttime. Possible ways to try to lower fasting levels Go for a walk after your evening meal exercise has an insulin type effect on the bodys cells which can impact may hours after and so may help lower fasting levels Eat fewer carbohydrates in your evening meal remember that it is important to eat sufficient carbohydrates still to avoid keto Continue reading >>

Slightly High Fasting Glucose

Slightly High Fasting Glucose

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hello. I'm 32 weeks pregnant and was recently diagnosed with gestational diabetes after failing the 3 hour GTT. I have been given a glucometer and was told to test fasting blood sugar and again at 1 hour following each meal. I've been tracking this for a week now and so far after each meal, I'm below the 135mg/dl cutoff and often times, by a large margin. However, they want my fasting glucose to be below 95mg/dl and so far I've had two readings at 102, one at 105 and another at 99 during the last week. My dietician said that if I couldn't control my glucose through diet alone, I would need to go on insulin but I'm wondering how critical fasting gluocose readings are as long as I'm able to keep my after meal glucose within check. Anyone have any thoughts? Thanks! I am 35 weeks pregnant and was diagnosed with GDM right at 32 weeks as well... So, I am definitely not an expert at this, but I have had many conversations with my midwives and asked similar questions to this. As far as I can tell, your fasting level is extremely important. This is what your blood is doing on it's own, without any food. So, if your body is unable to regulate its blood normally, then insulin is necessary. However, a few elevated fasting levels is not a reason to go on insulin. My midwife told me to average all my fasting rates (you know... add them all together and divide by how many there are) and if that number is below your target, then you are still fine. Also, it is very important to eat a high protein snack before bed, or when you wake up to pee in the middle of the night. Sometimes blood sugar levels can be elev Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

As a specialist in gestational diabetes nutrition, I get a lot of questions about blood sugar and pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is controversial. It’s complicated. And there’s a lot of misinformation out there. I do my best to address the controversies in interviews and with participants in my online gestational diabetes course, but since I’ve been receiving more and more inquiries in my inbox from fellow healthcare professionals, I wanted to dispel some gestational diabetes myths head-on right here on the blog. I’ll also be attending some midwifery conferences this year (including one this weekend), and I figured this resource would be a helpful place to refer practitioners if they have questions. Given the medical interventions that are commonly pushed on women with gestational diabetes (believe me, I’m also disheartened by the over-medicalization of pregnancy and birth), it’s important to understand the science behind high blood sugar and pregnancy. My goal is to help moms and practitioners make better decisions – based on fact, not fear – so they can have the healthiest pregnancy possible. 9 Gestational Diabetes Myths Myth #1: Blood Sugar Levels are Naturally Higher In Pregnancy There’s a lot of misinformation floating around about blood sugar levels in pregnancy. Some think that gestational diabetes is a “diagnosis looking for a disease.” In other words, they believe that blood sugar levels naturally go up during pregnancy, so there’s nothing to worry about. Some practitioners don’t even test for gestational diabetes and just tell their patients to “eat healthy” under the assumption that any rise in blood sugar is just a normal phenomenon of pregnancy. Unfortunately, that’s not true. Research has looked at blood sugar levels in nor Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Questions Just diagnosed with gestational diabetes Got a diagnosis of gestational diabetes My doc recommended the Sweet Success program at Alta Bates Cesarean vs induction w/gestational diabetes Related Pages More advice about Diabetes More advice about Pregnancy I was just diagnosed with gestational diabetes with baby number two. I am twenty- six weeks pregnant - age 40. After a little over a week on the diet/exercise plan I am doing well controlling my numbers with the exception of my waking/fasting test. I am supposed to be under 95 and am consistently above 95, typically between 105 and 115. I am wondering if anyone had used acupuncture to help with this condition. Also, I would love to hear from members who were successful at controlling their numbers with diet. We had planned a home birth with a very experienced midwife prior to this diagnosis. I would love to hear from anyone who has had a home birth after being diagnosed with GD. My WC Kaiser doctor says she never recommends HB so I am not sure how much help she will be in determining the best plan. Thanks. Anon I had the same problem when I was pregnant with my first child. I could control my blood sugar, but that fasting one was always too high. I didn't have a home birth, but considered one and was told it was fine as long as I didn't have to go on insulin. I found with my fasting b.s. that it was very effected by what I ate the day before, even if my blood sugar right after eating didn't seem to be. So, I was able to get my fasting down by really cutting down on carbs and sugars and bulking up on protein. I would eat small portions of brown rice and quinoa and a little fruit, but that was it. I ate beans, which actually help to regulate blood sugar. I also found if I went for a walk right before bed my numbe Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Explanation of gestational diabetes & personal reflection of what to expect if you are diagnosed during your pregnancy. Not to worry, it’s can be managed! When you’re pregnant many people love to say “Now you can eat for two!” or “Your pregnant, this is the time you can eat what you want!” Unfortunately, these words of wisdom are not entirely accurate. Every mom-to-be dreads the glucose tolerance test, which involves ingesting a high concentration of glucose (a form of sugar) mixed with water to see if you have gestational diabetes. It’s a grueling test because you have to sit in a doctor’s office or clinic for a few hours while they take blood samples before and 2-3 times after you drink the solution. Before the test, you have to fast for 8 hours and this alone makes mamas pretty aggravated but then with the drink solution you have to deal with a sugar high! Waiting for the results, you cross your fingers and hope that the last 24-28 weeks you’ve had a balanced, healthy diet. I knew that I had increased my carbohydrate and sweet intake more than before I was pregnant, but I was hoping the test would still be negative. Unfortunately, when I got the call from my doctor who then said I had gestational diabetes, my first reaction was guilt. How could I have done this to my baby? Gestational Diabetes 101 I want to make sure I disclose this up front, I am not a doctor, I’m just sharing my experience with gestational diabetes. My daily pregnancy routine consisted of exercising five times a week and eating healthy on most days. However, I knew I could have eaten healthier in the last trimester, but I didn’t (those darn cravings and ravishing bouts of hunger!). As I learned more about gestational diabetes, I realized that our bodies change so much during p Continue reading >>

Sleep Duration And Blood Glucose Control In Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Sleep Duration And Blood Glucose Control In Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: To describe the relationship between objectively assessed sleep and blood glucose in a prospective cohort of women recently diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Women with GDM were enrolled immediately after attending a GDM education class. All patients were recruited during their first week of attempted dietary management of GDM. They were instructed on the use of a glucometer and on the principles of a GDM diet. Women wore an actigraph and completed a sleep log for 7 consecutive days. Glucose records were compared against the objective sleep data. Linear mixed model analysis was used to estimate the association of sleep duration on morning fasting and one-hour postprandial blood glucose concentrations. Thirty-seven participants provided data for 213 sleep-intervals that corresponded to at least one glucose reading. Sleep duration was negatively associated with fasting and one-hour postprandial blood glucose concentrations In analyses adjusted for age, gestational age and BMI, a one-hour increase in sleep time was associated with statistically significant reductions in fasting glucose (−2.09 mg/dL, 95% CI −3.98, −0.20) as well as postprandial glucose concentrations [lunch −4.62 mg/dL (95% CI −8.75, −0.50), dinner −6.07 mg/dL (95% CI −9.40, −2.73)]. Short sleep durations are associated with worsened glucose control in women with gestational diabetes. Educating women on healthy sleep and screening for and treating sleep disorders during pregnancy may have a role in optimizing blood glucose control in gestational diabetes. Continue reading >>

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Stumped by high fasting blood glucose results? Join the club. "It just doesn't compute. When I snack before bed, my fastings are lower than when I limit my night nibbles," says Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. "It's logical for people to point the finger for high fasting blood sugar numbers at what they eat between dinner and bed, but surprisingly food isn't the lead villain," says Robert Chilton, M.D., a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The true culprit is compromised hormonal control of blood glucose levels. The Essential Hormones During the years (up to a decade) that type 2 diabetes develops, the hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. Four hormones are involved in glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, a group of hormones secreted from the intestines that includes glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available. {C} How the Essential Hormones Work in the Body When d Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

Bedtime Snacks For Diabetics And Gestational Diabetes: Beat The Dawn Phenomenon

Bedtime Snacks For Diabetics And Gestational Diabetes: Beat The Dawn Phenomenon

Bedtime snacks go against everything we are taught in our nutrition classes. I have always known that eating after 8 p.m. will make me fat, so I avoid it. That all changes when you have diabetes, however. Bedtime snacks can become a critical component of managing blood sugar levels, particularly your fasting blood sugar. Although you would logically expect to have low numbers after eight hours of sleeping, some people with diabetes and gestational diabetes notice higher than expected fasting blood sugar numbers. This is due to what is known as The Dawn Phenomenon. What is the Dawn Phenomenon? The dawn phenomenon is a rise in blood sugar during the early morning hours, usually between 3 a.m. and 8 a.m. There are two theories as to why this occurs in some diabetics. One is that it is caused by our bodies naturally releasing certain growth hormones overnight that are linked to insulin resistance. This insulin resistance may be stronger in some people, which explains why some will experience the dawn phenomenon and not others. The second theory, which is where bedtime snacks come into play, is that the liver produces too much glucose after fasting too long. Our livers are designed to produce extra glucose to help us have the energy to wake up in the morning. In people with diabetes, the difference between the insulin and blood sugar produced is often unequal, resulting in higher fasting blood sugars. To combat this phenomenon, a small snack that contains both carbs and protein can help give your body something to digest longer, keeping your blood sugar levels on an even keel. For gestational diabetes, some recommendations are as high as 45 grams of carbs in a bedtime snack. I have found this number to be much too high for me, but around 30 grams works well. Once I began hav Continue reading >>

Tips Or Tricks For Lowering Fasting Morning Glucose Levels Without Resorting To Insulin? May 15, 2006 10:05 Am Subscribe

Tips Or Tricks For Lowering Fasting Morning Glucose Levels Without Resorting To Insulin? May 15, 2006 10:05 Am Subscribe

Tips or tricks for lowering fasting morning glucose levels without resorting to insulin? Yes, yes, I know ... see my doctor, etc. etc. etc. I'm getting quality medical care, I just want more opinions, and maybe some non-traditional approaches. Short form: I may or may not have gestational diabetes. My 1 hour and 3 hour glucose tollerance tests were extremely high, but there is some debate as to whether the after effects of a recent severe illness may account for some of that. My blood glucose levels are fine during the day (always below 120 tested 2 hours postprandial, provided I don't eat anything stupid) but when I test in the morning my levels are between 102 - 115 (most often 107). If I'm not able to drop those morning fasting levels down to about 95 in the next few days, I'm going to have to start taking insulin in the evenings, with the end result that I'll have to leave my current midwife's practice and get an OB and give birth at a hospital rather than at the birth center where I'm currently a client. I'm pretty desperate to avoid this if at all possible. My diabetes councelor has advised me to try eating a snack directly before bed that is mainly protein (peanut butter or chicken, etc), and exercising right before bed. I'm going to do both of these, but was wondering if any diabetic or medical type metafilter folks had any other suggestions, either for diet suppliments or other diet-related approaches that have worked for them. I am currently adding 1 teaspoon of cinnamon to my diet daily as seen in this study and it does seem to help... I'm no doctor, but I am diabetic, and I'd second-guess some of what you're being told. Your blood glucose levels are a little high for a non-diabetic, but they're very low for a diabetic. You seem to be borderline. I'd say you Continue reading >>

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

Do you wake up with a blood glucose level that’s higher than when you went to bed? You might wonder how this could be. Is this “dawn phenomenon” serious, and what can you do about it? Our reader Mishelle commented here, “I don’t eat [much] during the day. [I take metformin morning and night.] My blood sugar is still too high in the morning…sometimes 125–140ish.” How can Mishelle’s glucose levels go up if she didn’t eat anything? She probably has a mild case of dawn phenomenon. Her glucose is going up from sources other than digested food. Some of it is produced by the liver from stored starch and fatty acids. Livers that produce too much glucose are one of the main ways diabetes causes high blood glucose levels. Other organs also produce small amounts of glucose. This is called “gluconeogenesis” for you science freaks out there. Organs do this to keep blood glucose from going too low at night or other times of not eating. From about 2 AM to 8 AM, most people’s bodies produce hormones, including cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine. All these hormones increase insulin resistance and tell the liver to make more glucose. The idea is to get you enough glucose to get out of bed and start the day. The whole process is apparently started by growth hormones. Everyone has a dawn phenomenon. Otherwise they’d be too weak to get breakfast. But in people without diabetes, insulin levels also increase to handle the extra glucose. People with diabetes can’t increase insulin levels that much, so their early morning blood glucose levels can rise dramatically. Experts disagree on how many people have a dawn phenomenon. Estimates range from 3% to 50% of Type 2s and from 25% to 50% of Type 1s. Is dawn phenomenon a serious problem? It can be serious. According t Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - My Story And Recipes

Gestational Diabetes - My Story And Recipes

This is a little bit of a departure from my normal blog posts. However, I thought sharing my experience with gestational diabetes would be good to raise awareness and let other pregnant gals hear a first hand account. I hope you keep reading and that you learn something. The recipes, ideas and meal suggestions are healthy for anyone diabetic or not. Heading into my third trimester gestational diabetes was not on my radar. It blindsided me. I didn't expect to be diagnosed. I've been very proactive about my health. I've focused on eating well, maintaining a good weight and getting exercise. I only had two of the risk factors: I'm over 25 and I do have history of type II diabetes from both my maternal grandfather and paternal grandmother. Although they both were diagnosed late in life and already had other health problems so it just didn't seem relevant. When I failed the first 1-hour non-fasting glucose test I figured it was a fluke and I would pass the longer 3-hour fasting glucose test. I didn't. For the 1-hour glucose test, anything over 130mg/dL (or 140mg/dL depending on your doctor) is high enough to warrant the three-hour test. If your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL they don't even bother with the 3-hour test and confirm a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Usually pregnant women are tested between 24 and 28 weeks. At week 28 my blood sugar tested at 138 mg/dL. What is considered elevated blood glucose levels vary by doctor and practice. From what I've read, I go to a fairly conservative practice. Below you can see the American Diabetes Association scores to diagnose gestational diabetes verses the practice I go to and then what my scores were. The 3-hour fasting glucose test involves not eating for 12 hours, then having blood drawn. That's the first fasting score. Th Continue reading >>

High Fasting Levels

High Fasting Levels

High fasting levels are a huge problem for many ladies. Fasting blood sugar levels, levels taken first thing in the morning when you wake up, are the hardest thing to control with gestational diabetes. But why is that? When we're sleeping we are not eating and drinking and we are not active and so the body is left to it's own devices with regards to controlling blood sugar levels. Impacts on fasting blood sugar levels Many things can impact fasting levels: what you've eaten earlier in the evening when you last ate hydration levels how well you've slept the dawn phenomenon the Somogyi effect What you ate earlier in the evening Bearing in mind how much of each food group converts to glucose in the bloodstream and the time taken, your fasting levels may be impacted by this. Too much carbohydrate in your evening meal or as a snack before bed can contribute to high fasting levels, as your body can only produce or use so much insulin, so if you raise your blood sugars too high by eating too much carbohydrate, your body can spend the night battling to try to lower your blood sugar levels. A high fat meal such as takeaway food can also cause higher blood sugar levels and so eating a well paired evening meal is important. When you last ate The key to stabilising blood sugar levels is to eat small amounts, often. We obviously cannot do this throughout the night, but if you eat your evening meal early and do not eat again until breakfast the following day, it can be an extremely long time to go without eating. Likewise, if you eat a large meal just before going to bed, this too can have a detrimental effect on your fasting levels. Hydration levels Dehydration will cause higher blood sugar levels. Water helps to flush excess sugar from the body and so it is important to stay well h Continue reading >>

Coping With Gestational Diabetes

Coping With Gestational Diabetes

I got diagnosed with GD on Monday, and I have had to do quite a radical diet change but my morning sugars are too high (over 5) how did you get them lower? I don’t want to go on insulin and I am following the rules to the letter. How did you cope and regulate everything? It seems to me that before diagnosis I was eating less now I am eating small meals what feels like constantly (every 2 hours) GD – gestational diabetes (Medical disclaimer: Tips provided need to be considered in conjunction with medical advice. For immediate concerns, please contact HealthDirect (Australia wide) ph 1800 022 222 – to talk to a registered nurse 24hrs a day, and in emergencies call 000.) * Note diabetes needs to be carefully managed by your medical team* I was diagnosed with GD at 26 weeks. I found a few things that helped lower sugars. Firstly always have protein with your carbs. I found things like chicken and eggs always bought my levels down. So eat more protein. Secondly I started walking for 40 minutes every morning and noticed a huge difference. My levels dropped drastically. Keep a food diary as everyone is different and responds differently to certain foods, eg I couldn’t eat low gi raisin toast or bananas but could eat pasta, low gi soy and linseed bread etc. I always had a glass of milk before bed too. You will work out what works for you. My boy was born at 38 weeks healthy and 6lb 13oz. Good luck! Pip I had the same problem. I did end up on insulin, but what helped for a while was having a protein based snack right before bed. No carbs, just protein. Also, every time I woke up I drank some water. Also remember guidelines are just that, guidelines. I stressed out completely, worried I was making my baby sick as I couldn’t get those morning numbers under control (rest Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

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