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Generic Insulin Names

Common Side Effects Of Basaglar (basaglar Insulin Glargine Subcutaneous Injection) Drug Center - Rxlist

Common Side Effects Of Basaglar (basaglar Insulin Glargine Subcutaneous Injection) Drug Center - Rxlist

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP Basaglar (insulin glargine injection) is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Common side effects of Basaglar include low blood sugar ( hypoglycemia ), allergic reactions, injection site reactions, body fat redistribution, itching, rash, swelling, weight gain , upper respiratory tract infection , runny or stuffy nose , back pain , cough, urinary tract infection , diarrhea, depression, or headache. The dose of Basaglar is individualized based on metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring, glycemic control, type of diabetes , and prior insulin use. Basaglar may interact with antidiabetic agents, ACE inhibitors , angiotensin II receptor blocking agents, disopyramide, fibrates , fluoxetine , monoamine oxidase inhibitors, pentoxifylline , pramlintide , propoxyphene , salicylates, somatostatin analogs, sulfonamide antibiotics, atypical antipsychotics, corticosteroids, danazol, diuretics, estrogens , glucagon , isoniazid, niacin , oral contraceptives, phenothiazines, progestogens, protease inhibitors, somatropin , sympathomimetic agents, thyroid hormones , alcohol, beta-blockers, clonidine , lithium salts, guanethidine, and reserpine. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or become pregnant while taking Basaglar. Insulin needs may change during pregnancy. It is unknown if Basaglar passes into breast milk. Insulin needs may change while a woman is breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our Basaglar (insulin glargine injection) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the pote Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

Insulin (medication)

Insulin (medication)

"Insulin therapy" redirects here. For the psychiatric treatment, see Insulin shock therapy. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar.[3] This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but some forms may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[5] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[5] It comes in three main types short–acting (such as regular insulin), intermediate–acting (such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine).[5] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[7] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$2.39 to $10.61 per 1,000 iu of regular insulin and $2.23 to $10.35 per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[8][9] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of regular or NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while this amount of insulin glargine costs 30.68 pounds.[5] Medical uses[edit] Giving insulin with an insulin pen. Insulin is used to treat a number of diseases including diabetes and its acute complications such as diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

A Cheaper Version Of The Lifesaving Diabetes Medication Just Launched In The Us

A Cheaper Version Of The Lifesaving Diabetes Medication Just Launched In The Us

A Type 1 diabetes patient holds up bottles of insulin.Reuters/Lucy Nicholson A new form of insulin just hit American markets. It's called Basaglar, and it is 15% less than the list price of Lantus and Toujeo, two long-acting insulins made by Sanofi Aventis, 21% less than the list price of Levemir, and 28% less than Tresiba, two long-acting insulins made by Novo Nordisk. Basaglar was approved in December 2015, but had to wait a year before launching on Thursday. A spokeswoman for Eli Lilly, the company that makes Basaglar and other insulins, told Business Insider that the list price for a pack of 5 pens is $316.85 — that's before any discounts, or factoring in what insurance might cover. It is part of a group of medications called "follow-on biologics" and together, they are expected to save the US billions of dollars over the next decade. Why there's no generic form of insulin For people living with Type 1 diabetes and some who live with Type 2, injections of insulin — a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food — are a necessary part of daily life. And insulin, in one form or another, has been around since the 1920s. But because it's made of living cells, it’s what doctors call a biologic product, and it's more complicated and difficult to manufacture than the medicines most often produced generically. That's why Basaglar isn't considered a generic, it's called a "follow-on biologic." Others taking this approach have gotten approved as biosimilars, and like Basaglar have come in at a slight discount — roughly 15% — off the list price of the original drug. To become a follow-on biologic, Basaglar had to show that its version of the drug was "sufficiently similar to Lantus to scientifically justify reliance," and the drug had to be tested Continue reading >>

9 Types Of Medications You Should Think Twice About Replacing

9 Types Of Medications You Should Think Twice About Replacing

Many medications can be changed from brand name to generic, or vice versa, with no problems. But sometimes even tiny changes in a medication formula can make a big difference in how a medication affects your body. Here are nine types of medications you need to talk to your doctor about before switching. Medications for underactive thyroid Because the thyroid is such a sensitive gland, even a small change in the dose of your thyroid medication may have a major effect on the amount of thyroid hormone in your blood. “Generic products do not have to contain the same inactive ingredients as the comparable brand-name products,” explains Susan W. Miller, professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice at Mercer University College of Pharmacy in Atlanta. “For any patient, levothyroxine — whether brand names Synthroid, Levoxyl or Levothroid, or generic — should ideally not be switched,” Miller says. If a switch is necessary, “the patient’s thyroid levels should be closely monitored to detect changes in the blood levels of the hormone,” she cautions. Asthma inhalers There are several different forms of albuterol inhalers (Ventolin, Proventil HFA, ProAir HFA, ProAir RespiClick) and levalbuterol (Xopenex HFA). Miller says it’s hard to get the exact same response when using different albuterol inhalers because they are “rescue therapy” for asthma attacks. To play it safe, don’t change the brand of your albuterol inhaler without your doctor’s supervision and monitoring. Also, you might want to double-check your prescription before you leave the pharmacy in order to make sure your new inhaler matches the one you had picked up the last time. Digoxin for heart failure In 1984, Congress passed a law that made it faster and easier to get generic medi Continue reading >>

'generic' Biosimilar Insulin Becoming Reality!

'generic' Biosimilar Insulin Becoming Reality!

As our community struggles with the skyrocketing prices of insulin, new hope dawns. After screaming for years that "WE WANT GENERIC INSULIN!," we are now finally entering the long-awaited era of biosimilars (even if they aren't technically called that by U.S. regulatory leaders), that are basically similar lower-cost versions of already-approved insulins. To be clear, this is a whole new world of insulin products different from anything we've seen before. We’re not talking about those Walmart "generic" insulins that are just cheap forms of older-gen products like R, N, and 70/30 mix simply sold under Walmart’s ReliOn brand name. In contrast, these new biosimilar “generics” are actually novel formulations that copy the biological molecule of an existing insulin. As of today, Dec. 15, Eli Lilly's new Basaglar basal insulin becomes available to buy here in the U.S. This is the first so-called “follow-on” version of competitor Sanofi's successful long-acting insulin Lantus, and there’s been a ton of buzz about its potential to bring down insulin prices across the board and reshape insurance coverage. This is the first, and we expect to see a second biosim launched within a year, followed by a variety of these lower-cost insulins, both fast-acting and long-acting. You may be surprised to see that these copycat insulins are not coming from newcomers, but from established Pharma companies themselves, now that they finally have the opportunity to undercut each other as their signature insulins go off patent. But that's what it is, Folks: Insulin Wars. And although we may be caught in the middle as patients, we do have a chance to save money with the introduction of these new generics we've been demanding for so long. 'Generic' Insulins Coming Soon The three bigges Continue reading >>

Insulin-injection, Humulin, Iletin I Nph, Novolin

Insulin-injection, Humulin, Iletin I Nph, Novolin

The display and use of drug information on this site is subject to express terms of use. By continuing to view the drug information, you agree to abide by such terms of use. INSULIN-INJECTION, Humulin, Iletin I NPH, Novolin GENERIC NAME: INSULIN - INJECTION (IN-sue-lin) BRAND NAME(S): Humulin, Iletin I NPH, Novolin HOW TO USE: Insulin must be injected. Learn the proper way to inject insulin. Check the dose carefully. Clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site daily to prevent skin bulges or pockets. Do not inject cold insulin. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature. The length of time you can store it at room temp. depends on the product. Consult your pharmacist. Insulin is frequently injected 30 minutes before a meal. Some inject at bedtime. Ask your pharmacist or nurse for details of injecting insulin as it varies depending on your insulin treatment plan. Monitor your urine or blood sugar as prescribed. Keep track of your results. This is very important in order to determine the correct insulin dose. Follow all of your doctor's directions carefully. Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication SIDE EFFECTS: Insulin may cause minor and usually temporary side effects such as rash, irritation or redness at the injection site. To help prevent hypoglycemia, eat meals on a regular schedule. Too much insulin can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The symptoms include cold sweat, shaking, rapid heart rate, weakness, headache and fainting which, if untreated, may lead to slurred speech and other behaviors that resemble drunkenness. If you experience these symptoms, eat a quick source of sugar such as glucose (glutose, etc.) table sugar, orange juice, honey or non-diet soda. Tell your doctor about the r Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

What are Insulin Insulin is a hormone that occurs naturally in the body and can also be given by injection as a treatment for diabetes. Naturally-occurring insulin is made by the beta cells of the Islets of Langerhans located in the pancreas. It helps the cells of the body to uptake glucose (sugar) found in the carbohydrates we eat so that it can be used as energy or stored for later use. Insulin also controls glucose release from the liver. One of the main roles of insulin is to keep blood glucose levels from going too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). People with type 1 diabetes do not make enough insulin to satisfy their body's needs or make none at all. Insulin given by injection acts similarly to naturally occurring insulin. There are more than 20 different types of insulin available for diabetes treatment in the United States. The various types of insulin differ in several ways: such as source (animal, human or genetically engineered), the time for insulin to take effect and the length of time the insulin remains working (ie, rapid acting, short acting, intermediate acting, long acting or very long acting). Insulin is used to treat Type 1 diabetes and it may be used together with oral medications in the later stages of Type 2 diabetes. List of Insulin: Filter by: -- all conditions -- Drug Name View by: Brand | Generic Reviews Avg. Ratings Humulin R (Pro, More...) generic name: insulin regular 0 reviews 10 NovoLog Mix 70 / 30 FlexPen (More...) generic name: insulin aspart/insulin aspart protamine 0 reviews 10 Humalog Mix 75 / 25 (More...) generic name: insulin lispro/insulin lispro protamine 2 reviews 9.5 NovoLog Mix 70 / 30 (More...) generic name: insulin aspart/insulin aspart protamine 3 reviews 9.5 ReliOn / Novolin 70 / 30 (More...) generic name: i Continue reading >>

Why A Lifesaving Drug That's Been Around Since 1923 Is Still Unaffordable

Why A Lifesaving Drug That's Been Around Since 1923 Is Still Unaffordable

Insulin is administered by injection. AP An essential drug that has been on the market for decades still has a sticker price out of range for some patients who need it. Insulin, a lifesaving treatment for diabetes, was first patented in 1923. Unlike many common, even newer medicines, a generic option does not exist. At the same time, the cost of insulin has more than tripled. According to a 2016 analysis in the Journal of the American Medical Association, in 2002, the cost per patient per year was $231. In 2013, it was closer to $736. Today, almost 22 million Americans are diagnosed diabetics. Of those, about 26% take insulin to manage the chronic disease. (The rest take pills only or no medication at all.) The reasons these Americans don’t have a cheaper option for insulin by now isn't simple. It has a lot to do with biology and regulations. Those issues are compounded by historical and economic factors, a 2015 paper in the New England Journal of Medicine reported. Insulin's biology makes it tricky to copy Typically, new prescription drugs are available only from the company that developed and patented them for the first few years after gaining FDA approval. The brand-name drug is allowed to monopolize the field so drug companies have incentive to invest heavily in research and come up with new medicines. After a few years, however, other companies are allowed to start making generic versions of the drug — cheaper, “off-brand” options that are otherwise exactly the same as the original. Because there’s no longer a monopoly and generic manufacturers are only trying to turn a profit — not recoup high research and development costs — generics can be much less expensive and thus more accessible treatment options for the general public. But insulin didn't foll Continue reading >>

Insulin A To Z: A Guide On Different Types Of Insulin

Insulin A To Z: A Guide On Different Types Of Insulin

Elizabeth Blair, A.N.P., at Joslin Diabetes Center, helps break down the different types of insulin and how they work for people with diabetes. Types of Insulin for People with Diabetes Rapid-acting: Usually taken before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating. This type of insulin is used with longer-acting insulin. Short-acting: Usually taken about 30 minutes before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating. This type of insulin is used with longer-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting: Covers the blood glucose elevations when rapid-acting insulins stop working. This type of insulin is often combined with rapid- or short-acting insulin and is usually taken twice a day. Long-acting: This type of insulin is often combined, when needed, with rapid- or short-acting insulin. It lowers blood glucose levels when rapid-acting insulins stop working. It is taken once or twice a day. A Guide on Insulin Types for People with Diabetes Type Brand Name Onset (length of time before insulin reaches bloodstream) Peak (time period when insulin is most effective) Duration (how long insulin works for) Rapid-acting Humalog Novolog Apidra 10 - 30 minutes 30 minutes - 3 hours 3 - 5 hours Short-acting Regular (R) 30 minutes - 1 hour 2 - 5 hours Up to 12 hours Intermediate- acting NPH (N) 1.5 - 4 hours 4 - 12 hours Up to 24 hours Long-acting Lantus Levemir 0.8 - 4 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours To make an appointment with a Joslin diabetes nurse educator, please call (617) 732-2400. Continue reading >>

Comprehensive List Of Diabetes Medications

Comprehensive List Of Diabetes Medications

Understanding Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes occurs when your body no longer makes or uses insulin as it’s intended to. Insulin is a naturally occurring substance in the body, but some people don’t make enough of it or their cells become insulin resistant. Diabetic patients must manage higher than normal blood sugar (or glucose) levels in the body. Diabetes is classified into two types (Type 1 and Type 2). Diabetics of both types require medicines to normalize blood glucose levels. If the doctor says you’re diabetic, he or she will prescribe drugs for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It’s good to know about the universe of treatment options diabetics have today. Here’s a comprehensive list of available diabetes medications along with links to Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes medication prices that will help you save up to 90% off U.S. retail prices. You may also find our Cheat Sheet helpful: 12 Ways to Save Money on Your Diabetes Medications [Cheat Sheet] Type 1 Diabetes Medications Short-Action Insulin Brand names: Novolin and Humulin (regular insulin) are two commonly prescribed, short-acting drugs your doctor may prescribe. Rapid-Action Insulin Brand names: Levemir FlexPen and NovoLog Flexpen are two commonly prescribed rapid action insulins. Brand name: Humalog Pen (insulin lispro) Brand name: Apidra (insulin glulisine) Intermediate-Action Insulin Brand name: Novolin N and Humulin N Pen (insulin isophane) are two intermediate-action insulins your doctor may prescribe. Long-Action Insulin Brand name Tresiba (insulin degludec) Brand name Levemir Flexpen (insulin detemir) Brand name Lantus Vials (insulin glargine) Brand name Toujeo (insulin glargine) Combination Medications Insulin Brand name: Ryzodeg Brand name: NovoLog Mix 70/30 Brand name: Novolin 70/30 Brand na Continue reading >>

‘generic’ Basaglar Is Cheaper Than Lantus But Does It Work?

‘generic’ Basaglar Is Cheaper Than Lantus But Does It Work?

Basaglar U-100 insulin glargine, which is a follow-on biologic insulin to Lantus is now available by prescription in the US. Basaglar, from Eli Lilly and Company and Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is not technically a generic to Lantus but it does have an amino acid sequence identical to Lantus and has been FDA approved as a long-acting insulin for patients of all ages with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. David Kendall, M.D. and the vice president of Global Medical Affairs for Lilly Diabetes said in Lilly’s press release, “Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim are proud to bring another proven effective diabetes treatment choice to people who may need a long-acting insulin to help control their blood sugar,” and that “We know that starting insulin can be a challenging experience for some people with type 2 diabetes. As part of our continuing commitment to the diabetes community, we are expanding our educational resources.” Is it Cheaper? Business Insider reported that Basaglar “is 15% less than the list price of Lantus and Toujeo, two long-acting insulins made by Sanofi Aventis, 21% less than the list price of Levemir, and 28% less than Tresiba, two long-acting insulins made by Novo Nordisk.” An Eli Lilly spokesperson told Business Insider that before discounts or insurance coverage, the list price for a 5-pen pack of Basaglar is $316.85. You will be able to get Basaglar from retail and mail order pharmacies. Basaglar has also been chosen for the formularies of the top three pharmacy benefit managers and is expected to be covered by many commercial insurance plans. The pharmacy benefit manager CVS Health has dropped Lantus and replaced it with Basaglar for their next year’s formulary. In their announcement, CVS Health stated that th Continue reading >>

Humulin R

Humulin R

Brand Names: Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R Generic Name: insulin regular (Pronunciation: IN soo lin REG yoo lar) What is the most important information I should know about insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? What is insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? Insulin is a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin regular is a short-acting form of insulin. Insulin regular is used to treat diabetes. Insulin regular may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, fainting, or seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you have itching, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin where you inject insulin. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You m Continue reading >>

Can I Get Insulin Over The Counter?

Can I Get Insulin Over The Counter?

Jennifer Smith of Integrated Diabetes Services answers a question about generic insulin brands available at WalMart. We receive many questions about over-the-counter insulin, so we decided to ask certified diabetes educator Jennifer Smith of Integrated Diabetes Services (IDS) about it. Here’s her answer: Today, most prescriptions for those using insulin cover the most up-to-date types of insulin – basal insulins such as Lantus and Levemir, as well as rapid-acting insulins like Novolog, Humalog and Apidra. Read “Can I Use Insulin Past Its Expiration Date?” When you buy insulin over the counter (OTC), these brand-name insulins are not available. sponsor ReliOn Brand of insulin at Walmart is available without prescription in some states. However, it includes very limited types of insulin. These are the older generation of insulins, including R insulin, also called Regular (a short-acting insulin and N insulin (an intermediate-acting insulin taken twice a day). These generic OTC insulins have a very different action profile than prescribed insulins. However, generic does not by any means indicate low quality. Having an insulin back-up plan in case you find yourself with an outdated prescription or short on funds is important. It would be beneficial to discuss with a health care provider how to go about using these generic OTC insulins before you have to use them, however. Read “Why Walmart Insulins Aren’t the Answer to High Insulin Prices.” Rapid-acting insulin works faster and clears your body faster. Basal insulin analogs typically work longer and more evenly without a peak in action, unlike the intermediate-acting insulin that has to be taken two times a day. R and N insulin types require users to have a bit more stability to their meals and daily activitie Continue reading >>

Why Isn't There Any Cheap, Generic Insulin?

Why Isn't There Any Cheap, Generic Insulin?

HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research examines why people with diabetes who depend on injections of lifesaving insulin still have no cheaper generic options to treat their disease. "Surprisingly, this issue has not been talked about, so we're asking the question: Why is there no generic insulin?" said senior study author Dr. Kevin Riggs, a research fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. In their report, published March 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine, Riggs and his colleague Dr. Jeremy Greene describe how the unique development of insulin allowed pharmaceutical companies to continually improve the medication while extending patents for decades. Generic drugs cannot be made until a patent on a brand-name drug expires. One expert pointed out the possible repercussions. "This is a big issue. Some patients simply cannot afford to pay for the insulin that keeps their blood sugar down, even people who have health insurance," explained Dr. Joel Zonszein, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. He added that if insulin prices remain out of reach for some, the health care system will end up paying more in hospitalizations and treatments for complications related to undertreated or untreated diabetes. The cost of insulin for someone who doesn't have insurance runs from $120 to $400 a month, the researchers noted. Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone that's necessary for the body to use the sugars found in foods as fuel for the cells in the body and brain. In people with type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing cells (called beta cells) in the pancreas. This destroys their ability to make enough insulin to surv Continue reading >>

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