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Insulin Glargine

Insulin Glargine

Lowers blood sugar. Our bottom line Lantus (insulin glargine) is an effective, long-acting insulin that provides all-day blood sugar control, but it can cause low blood sugar levels, so be sure to have a source of sugar nearby. Insulin is one of the most effective blood sugar-lowering medication and can lower your A1c (average blood sugar over time) by up to 2-3%. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day sugar control with just once or twice daily dosing. Dose can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Lantus (insulin glargine) can be used with liver or kidney problems. You have to take insulin by injection. You may gain some weight, around 4-6 pounds. You have to maintain a consistent schedule to avoid low blood sugar episodes. Dramatic changes in weight or meal patterns will require dose adjustments. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-acting synthetic insulin for diabetes. It acts the same way as the insulin your body produces to break down sugars and fats. Sign up and get Pill Talk, the latest in health & medicine news from Iodine What to expect when you take Lantus (insulin glargine) for Diabetes Possible side effects Source: FDA product label and Iodine pharmacists Side effect rates for Lantus (insulin glargine) Where we got our data » Manufacturers don’t say how common these side effects are when taking Lantus for diabetes Fat accumulation Risks and Warnings for Lantus (insulin glargine) Higher risk if: › Insulin dose too high › Use of other blood sugar lowering medicines › Poor injection techniques Very low blood sugar is life-threatening. Recognize the symptoms of low blood sugar, which include fast heartbeat, sweating, pale skin, feeling shaky, confusion or irr Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

If you are a patient experiencing problems with a Sanofi US product, please contact Sanofi US at 1-800-633-1610. The health information contained herein is provided for general educational purposes only. Your healthcare professional is the single best source of information regarding your health. Please consult your healthcare professional if you have any questions about your health or treatment. Continue reading >>

Learn About Lantus® (insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

Learn About Lantus® (insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which coul Continue reading >>

Lantus Coupon

Lantus Coupon

Use this FREE Lantus pharmacy coupon to get the lowest price on your pet's Lantus prescription. Our discount coupons are pre-activated and can be used at over 68,000 pharmacies nationwide to save up to 75% off your prescription medication. Print your coupon, it's pre-activated and ready for use. If you do not have a printer you can save or text the coupon to your phone. Present your pet drug coupon to the pharmacist when paying for your prescription. Lantus is the brand name for insulin glargine, an insulin analog made by Aventis. Lantus is a very long-acting insulin (lasting up to 24 hours in humans) that uses pH reactions to form micro-precipitates under the skin, which create a time-release action. Continue reading >>

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

It looks like this page may be out of date. Please visit NerdWallet’s health hub for our latest content. Diabetics don’t have much of a choice when it comes to taking their insulin, and the costs can be very high, so a Lantus coupon can be invaluable. Paired with diabetic supplies like syringes and blood glucose testing equipment, diabetes is an expensive disease. But with a little bit of information and some resourcefulness, you may be able to save on your monthly prescriptions. Lantus is a long-acting insulin made by Sanofi-Aventis and prescribed to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. Diabetics are unable to naturally produce or use insulin like most people, so they take injections of synthetic insulin to help regulate their blood sugar. Generic Lantus At this time, there is no generic form of Lantus available. However, that may soon change. The patents protecting Lantus from cheaper generic alternatives expired in February 2015, so less expensive forms of the drug may be coming. When this happens, opting for generic will likely be the best way to save on Lantus, and because of FDA requirements, you don’t have to worry about the generic version being less effective or less safe. Although some people avoid buying generics because they are afraid they won’t work as well as the name brands, those fears are largely unfounded. Lantus coupons from the manufacturer One carton of Lantus can cost close to $400 without insurance, according to GoodRx.com, though Lantus may very well be part of your insurance formulary. Currently, the maker of the drug offers a Lantus Savings Card. According to its website, the card can reduce your prescription cost to no more than $25. However, it also says there is a maximum benefit of $100 off each prescription for the duration of the pr Continue reading >>

How You Can Get Your Lantus And Apidra Through The Sanofi Patient Connection Program Absolutely Free

How You Can Get Your Lantus And Apidra Through The Sanofi Patient Connection Program Absolutely Free

As part of our series on Diabetes, we are discussing Sanfi Aventis medications available to the uninsured through the Sanofi Patient Connection Program. Qualifying applicants receive free 90 day supplies of their Sanofi Aventis medications delivered directly to their doctor’s office. This program offers assistance with Apidra Vials and SoloStar Pens and Lantus Vials and SoloStar Pens. The Sanofi Patient Connection Program is available to uninsured Americans whose gross household income falls below 250% of the Federal Poverty Level. There are some exceptions for patients who are in the Medicare Part D donut hole and some Medicare eligible patients who have been denied Low Income Subsidy and Medicaid assistance. This program requires new applicants to submit supporting documents, called Proof of Income, or POI for short, to verify that your household income is below 250% of the Federal Poverty Level. The Sanofi Patient Connection program will either tax documentation or current proof of household income such as paycheck stubs, Social Security Award Letters, Unemployment Statements and even bank statements. If you are submitting current proof of income, be sure that you turn in your most recent months’ worth so that the program can get a clear understanding of your financial situation. If your household currently has zero income, you will need to submit your tax documentation. If you did not file taxes, a 4506-T Verification of Non-Filing Form can be submitted to the IRS and the form they return to you submitted to the PAP. For More information about what to send in as Proof Of Income, click here. If your tax documents show that your household income was over 250% of the Federal Poverty Level, but there has been a change and your current gross household income is below Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Buy Sanofi Lantus (insulin Gargine) | Free P&p | Eu Shipped

Buy Sanofi Lantus (insulin Gargine) | Free P&p | Eu Shipped

Write an online review and share your thoughts. Lantus is a new medicine for diabetes manufactured by French pharmaceutical company Sanofi. Classed as a long acting basal insulin analogue, Lantus is comprised of microcrystals that gradually release insulin over the course of 18-26 hours making Lantus a once a day option for diabetics who require insulin to manage their condition. Invented by Sanofi, Lantus is the largest and most important export for the company generating billions of euros in sales. Sanofi have stated that Lantus does not have peaks and troughs making it better resemble the pharmokinetic profile of basal insulin in non-diabetic populations. For patients who do not wish to inject for each meal, Lantus offers a clear improvement in its once a day protocol. Lantus users should see an improvement in blood sugar management and its accompanying pen allows for very precise dosing. Lantus is licensed for use to both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Lantus, while administered once a day may see its dose vary with ongoing use. The initial dose will be established by the prescribing physician. Always refer to product literature Continue reading >>

Lantus Prescription Assistance

Lantus Prescription Assistance

When you have diabetes, every decision you make is colored by your condition. How much insulin should you bring on your next overnight trip? Will there be time to get a snack or take insulin between your appointments? At Simplefill, we understand the hard choices you make every day when you’re managing your diabetes. If you or someone you love is living with diabetes, it’s critical for you to have the right diabetes medication, like Lantus, by your side when you need it. Unfortunately, it’s becoming harder and harder for millions of Americans to afford the medications they desperately need. Whether it’s the Medicare donut hole or the increasing costs of insurance, it can be a real challenge to cover the costs of medications like Lantus insulin treatment when you have to pay out-of-pocket. If you or a loved one has diabetes and needs diabetes prescription assistance, including Lantus prescription treatment, continue reading to learn more about how Simplefill can help. How insulin works in your body Insulin is a master hormone that helps turn glucose (sugar) into energy. Created in the pancreas, insulin helps shuttle glucose to your cells as well as your muscles and liver. When you eat, your blood sugar typically rises. It’s this rise in blood sugar (glucose) that triggers the pancreas to produce and release insulin into your bloodstream. When you have inadequate levels of insulin, sugar can’t get to where it needs to go. It stays in your bloodstream too long, which raises your blood sugar levels. Furthermore, depending on what type of diabetes you have, you can either produce too much or too little insulin. Insulin comes in several forms, depending on your body’s need In the treatment of diabetes, choosing the right kind of insulin is important because ever Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml?

(insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml?

Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Tweet Lantus is an analogue insulin produced by Sanofi-Aventis with the medical name insulin glargine. Lantus has been available for pharmaceutical use since the year 2000. Lantus hit the news in June 2009 over concerns that it may lead to the formation of cancer. However, the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) found the evidence suggesting the link to be inconclusive and cleared the drug for further use. What is Lantus? Lantus is an ultralente (long acting) analogue insulin. The medical name for Lantus, insulin glargine, is taken from how the DNA of human insulin is modified to form the analogue. In glargine’s case, glycine and two arginines are part of the genetic recombination that helps to produce the insulin. Who is Lantus prescribed to? Lantus can be prescribed for all types of diabetes. However, it is most commonly prescribed to people with type 1 diabetes. Lantus may be prescribed to people with type 2 diabetes for whom oral hypoglycemic agents have not shown to be sufficiently effective. How do I take Lantus? Lantus is injected, usually once daily at the same time each day. Like all insulins, Lantus should be injected subcutaneously (into the fatty tissue underneath the skin). The specific mode of action of Lantus means that it should never be diluted or mixed with any other insulin before injecting. Benefits of Lantus The mode of action of Lantus allows for a peakless profile. Lantus has become a popularly prescribed insulin as its consistent activity can help to reduce nocturnal hypoglycaemia. Side effects of Lantus Being an insulin, hypoglycemia can be a relatively common side effect of using Lantus, if dosages are too strong. Other side effects include allergic reactions and swelling, itching or pain at the injection site. Lantus and cancer link In June 200 Continue reading >>

How Do I Get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively?

How Do I Get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively?

November 2, 2013-- How do I get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively? DCIN receives this question a few times a week from US caregivers of diabetic cats. I am often amazed by the question because of the “good” insulins for diabetic cats, Lantus can be the least expensive per unit. The problem often lies in knowing how to find the insulin inexpensively. (The hints I give also apply to Levemir, another human insulin often used by diabetic cats.) Your vet gave you a prescription that probably read “U100 Glargine/Lantus 10ml vial.” Lantus is the brand name for the generic insulin Glargine. Lantus is an insulin for humans and is only available from a human pharmacy (although some vets do hold some in stock). The company Sanofi makes Lantus, and no other companies currently make a generic Glargine because Sanofi still has an international patent on the insulin. That may change in 2014, and by then Sanofi may have developed a “second-generation” Lantus that is patent protected. Lantus is a U100 insulin, which describes the concentration of the insulin in the liquid suspension. A 10ml vial is the insulin’s containment device. It is a small glass bottle with a rubber stopper at the end that you pierce with a syringe. At a US retail pharmacy, a 10ml vial of Lantus can cost about $180 to $200. WOWZA! That does seem cause for sticker shock. A 10ml vial of U100 insulin holds 1000 units of insulin. At $200/vial, that is a price of $.20/unit. If your cat gets 2 units of insulin twice a day, that is $.80/day for its insulin (if you could completely use a vial of Lantus insulin). It would cost less each day to give your cat its life-saving medicine that to buy a soda from a vending machine. However, the problem with buying Lantus in a 10ml vial is that, properly handled, Lantus Continue reading >>

Resources & Samples For Your Patients | Lantus (insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

Resources & Samples For Your Patients | Lantus (insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

Hello. My name is Sandy, and Id like to welcome you to the Guide to Administering Lantus Using the Lantus SoloSTAR Pen demonstration video. This video will provide you with some basic information about Lantus and teach you the proper technique for injecting Lantus with the Lantus SoloSTAR pen. But before we begin, lets review some important safety information for Lantus. Lantus is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Important Limitations of Use: Lantus is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Lantus is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuseneedles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, part Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications - Lantus (insulin Glargine)

High-alert Medications - Lantus (insulin Glargine)

The leaflets are FREELY available for download and can be reproduced for free distribution to consumers. Or, if you are a facility or organization, you can order professional pre-printed leaflets shipped directly to you. Extra care is needed because Lantus is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for Lantus When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. Lantus is a long-acting insulin that should be injected below the skin once daily as directed by your doctor. On rare occasions, your physician may direct you to take Lantus two times daily. Take Lantus the same time every day. 2. Prepare your insulin. A rapid- or short-acting insulin is often prescribed with Lantus. However, Lantus should never be mixed in the same syringe with other insulins before injection. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Dispose of used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Do not reuse or recycle syringes/needles or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. Avoid mix-ups. List If you use more than one type of insulin, make sure each vial or pen looks different to avoid mix-ups. Lantus is a long-acting insulin that may look like a rapid- or short-acting insulin. For Continue reading >>

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