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Forget To Take Insulin Before Bed

Getting The Right Dosage

Getting The Right Dosage

Even for those on Lantus® for a while, it may take a little time to get to the right dose of insulin. Your doctor may change your Lantus® dose several times in the first few weeks. This is to be expected. For best results, keep taking your Lantus® as prescribed, and keep talking to your doctor. What if You Miss a Dose? Your doctor will guide you on when to take Lantus®. Ask him or her what to do if you forget to take your insulin, so you can be prepared in advance in case it ever happens. Here are a few ways to remember to take your Lantus® once-a-day: 3 Helpful Tips Make yourself a reminder If you take your Lantus® at night, it might also be a good idea to leave yourself a note on your nightstand as a way to remember. If you take it in the morning, put your supplies where you can't miss them—next to your toothbrush, for example. Keep out of reach of children. Add it to your other daily "to dos" Many people take Lantus® right after brushing their teeth in the evening or while making breakfast in the morning. Set an Alarm Some people set alarms on their wristwatches or mobile devices to remind them when to take their Lantus®. “We changed doses a couple of times when I started on Lantus®, until we found the right amount for me.” Continue reading >>

Forgot To Take Insulin? Here Are 3 Tips To Help You Remember Your Insulin Shot

Forgot To Take Insulin? Here Are 3 Tips To Help You Remember Your Insulin Shot

5 0 It’s probably a safe bet to say that modern technology has made all of us a little more distracted. Whether we’re texting friends, checking our email, watching television, or playing video games, being able to focus completely on a task has become a bit of a chore. Unfortunately, that distraction can come at a cost – especially when you have diabetes and need to be able to remember when (or if) you took your last shot. So what do you do if you forgot to take insulin? Accidents happen and sometimes insulin shots get overlooked, and when that happens, we’ve covered the basics for accounting for that oversight in our blog post here about “What to Do if You Forget Your Insulin Shot”. But what if you just want to create an environment that helps you stay on track with your insulin schedule? Well, there’s some easy tips that can help you remember to take your shot and decrease the number of times you forget. And if you really want to ensure that you don’t miss a dose, grab a time-enabled replacement cap for your insulin pen from Timesulin. Now, on to the tips! 1. Don’t get distracted during injections You might be in the middle of a conversation or finishing work, but when it’s time to inject, politely excuse yourself and take care of it right away. Putting off any kind of task – even for one minute – can increase the likelihood of forgetting it altogether. 2. Lump daily habits together If your injection falls around the same time as other daily habits, get into the routine of doing them altogether. For example, an injection at night before you go to bed can be done along with brushing your teeth and washing your face. 3. Keep insulin injection supplies in an obvious location Having your insulin supplies in the location where you will need to injec Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Revisiting The Missed Insulin Shot Question

Ask D'mine: Revisiting The Missed Insulin Shot Question

Need help navigating life with diabetes? Ask D'Mine! That would be our weekly advice column, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and clinical diabetes educator Wil Dubois This week, Wil takes another look at a common question often posed by those of us in the Diabetes Community: What do I do if I miss an insulin dose? Happens to us all, at times, and it's always good to refresh our knowledge. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Pete, type 2 from Florida, writes:I have been struggling with diabetes for 5 years. I will sometimes fail to do my shot before dinner and wonder if I should take the 40 units when I remember? Or wait and take it before bedtime? I am looking for guidance. I am tying to find a path that works. [email protected] D’Mine answers: One of the universal things we insulin users suffer from — no matter what type of diabetes we have or what type of insulin we take — is the missed shot. Yep, when it comes to life on insulin, the old rodeo adage of it’s not a matter of if you get hurt; it’s only a matter of when you’ll get hurt can be translated directly into diabetes: It’s not a matter of if you will miss a shot; it’s only a matter of when you will miss a shot. We talked about this briefly a while back, but it’s such a universal problem that’s so much more complicated than it looks on the surface, that I think it’s worth revisiting today. So here’s Professor Wil’s quick course on the inevitable missed shot dilemma: Types of Insulin There are two main kinds of insulin: The fast ones and the slow ones. We’ll start slow. Actually, no. I changed my mind. We’ll start fast, because the answer for a missed fast-acting insulin shot is, well, faster. The fast insulins are Apidra, Humalog, and Novolog. One member o Continue reading >>

What Happens If You Forget To Take Insulin?

What Happens If You Forget To Take Insulin?

Why not ask your diabetes team for a customised set of instructions for what to do if you forget your insulin? Then if it occurs you will already have the information you need. Make sure you ask for information that includes the following: 1. The amount of time after a missed injection e.g. Give x units if <2 hours after; Give x units if > 4 hours etc. 2. What your blood glucose levels are like at the time e.g. if high you don't need to drop the dose as much as if your levels are low and giving the injection later 3. What activity levels you will be doing - if doing more activity in the afternoon and levels already low, then the insulin dose will be lower than usual when giving it later. 4. The action times of your insulin/s - you need to consider the length of time the insulin will be working fior These 4 issues all influence the amount of insulin you would need to give yourself when you have missed the usual injection time. Why not book a session with your diabetes educator to go through the various components to feel more able to manage this situation. Everyone forgets their insulin sometimes but knowing what to do can make you feel better when it happens - because it is very likely to happen! Continue reading >>

Forgot Levemir Again!

Forgot Levemir Again!

Author Topic: forgot levemir again! (Read 1804 times) 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. Yes I forgot. I was so eager to get the kids to bed last night I completely forgot to give Caitlyn her levemir. I feel completely useless now she has a reading of 18. The nurse on children's ward said just continue as usual with novorapid but will ring her team in a bit. I just feel so guilty evrrytime I get it wrong and its not even myself I do it too Mum to T1 diabetic daughter diagnosed dec 2009 aged 3, now aged 6 Reply #1 on: 29 August 2012, 11:29:44 AM I totally feel for you. One think if you'd forgotten your own dose, another to forget your daughter's and that will make you feel wretched. Don't wind yourself up too much though, it's too easy to forget a dose when you are constantly injecting. I've had times when I've been scratching my head, thinking "did I inject this morning or didn't I?" In the end I have resorted to a physical method of reminding myself. When I inject my morning dose I place the insulin on my bedside table so I can't miss it when I go to bed. When I've injected the night time dose I place the insulin on the shelf over the bathroom sink so I see it in the morning. I'm not suggesting this will work for you, but could you devise something similar? In the past if I've forgotten the night dose I've given myself half the amount on top of my morning dose and adjusted if necessary with rapid acting. Type 1. Mis-diagnosed T2 May 2003, finally had CPeptide test 15/7/11 and proper diagnosis 1/9/11. Now pumping Apidra with Roche Spirit Combo pump. Hba1c 6.1 Sept 2017. Reply #3 on: 29 August 2012, 12:15:58 PM I dunno how much comfort this is to you, but the sheer number of times I have forgotten my insulin...and then of course you try to look back and remem Continue reading >>

Forgetting To Take My Lantus

Forgetting To Take My Lantus

I am supposed to take my Lantus before bed but I have forgotten a few times, I was thinking about setting an alarm to take it at like 10PM every night, I sometimes don't go to bed until around 1-2AM, will this be an issue if I take it a few hours before I actually go to bed? D.D. Family T1 since 1985, MM Pump 2013, CGM 2015 I actually forgot so often (and being a T1, how do I forget insulin?) that I eventually switched and just took it at dinner. Since Lantus is a long-acting insulin, with a flat curve, it shouldn't matter too much, and it didn't seem to hurt me. While taking it a bedtime might have helped reducing the risk of overnight lows, or help with DP possibly, these "plusses" were, for me, more than offset by the repeated missed doses. I can't tell you what to do. I'm not a doctor. But for me, taking it a few hours earlier than my doc would have liked, but remembering every day, seemed to be a better plan. Thanks! I see my Endo for the first time in 10 days, I will be sure to ask him what he thinks, but I do take my Humalog just before dinner, I have heard taking these at the same time at different sites is okay, and I taking them in pen form, so mixing syringes is something I have to never worry about, do you know if this is true? D.D. Family T1 since 1985, MM Pump 2013, CGM 2015 Thanks! I see my Endo for the first time in 10 days, I will be sure to ask him what he thinks, but I do take my Humalog just before dinner, I have heard taking these at the same time at different sites is okay, and I taking them in pen form, so mixing syringes is something I have to never worry about, do you know if this is true? At dinner I took two shots, one Novolog and one Lantus. Just keep them separate, like Lantus in the gut and Humalog either other side, or arm, or thigh, or b Continue reading >>

Asknadia: Accidentally Injected 50 Units Of Novolog Insulin Instead Of Lantus

Asknadia: Accidentally Injected 50 Units Of Novolog Insulin Instead Of Lantus

Dear Nadia: I was going to watch a little TV before going to sleep I was wanting to wait up on my husband to get home from work. I grabbed my Lantus and took it in to the bedroom so I wouldn’t forget to take it before falling asleep. After getting all comfy in bed I thought I should just go ahead and take my Lantus. I take 50 units of Lantus at bed time and 8 units of Novalog with meals. My Blood sugar before going to bed was 136 so I get my Lantus pen dial up 50 units and inject it…… as soon as I withdrew the pin I knew something was wrong, I had just opened that Lantus pin the night before there shouldn’t be much used out of it but the pen was almost all empty. OMG what have I done? That’s my Novalog pen I told myself. I had just injected myself with 50 units of fast acting insulin. I’ve never did anything like that before I was freaking out. I knew this wasn’t good I knew I had to do something and do it quick. I ran to the computer and typed in “I took to much Novalog what do I do?” The first thing I read was call 911. I called my husband he didn’t answer I sent a text ” I need to get to the ER NOW” . I started getting dressed. While I was dressing my husband called I told him what had happened and to hurry I needed him to take me to the ER. I knew I needed to eat or drink something with a lot of sugar. I am a low carb eater and sugar wasn’t something I kept in the house and just then I remember seeing a can of real Coke in the refrigerator that my husband must had bought. I ran in and grabbed it popped it open and starting drinking. My husband arrived home a few minutes later we went to the ER where I spent the next 6 hours getting my finger stuck every 15-30 minutes and drinking sugary drinks and eating chocolate trying to keep my sugar fr Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications - Levemir (insulin Detemir)

High-alert Medications - Levemir (insulin Detemir)

The leaflets are FREELY available for download and can be reproduced for free distribution to consumers. Or, if you are a facility or organization, you can order professional pre-printed leaflets shipped directly to you. Extra care is needed because Levemir is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for Levemir When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. Levemir is a long-acting insulin that should be injected below the skin once or twice daily. (When taken in smaller doses, Levemir may be considered an intermediate-acting insulin.) When Levemir is taken once daily, inject the insulin with the evening meal or at bedtime. When taken twice daily, the evening dose should be taken with the evening meal, at bedtime, or 12 hours following the morning dose. 2. Prepare your insulin. A rapid- or short-acting insulin is often prescribed with Levemir. However, Levemir should never be mixed in the same syringe with other insulins before injection. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Discard used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Don't reuse or recycle syringes, needles, or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. t Avoid mix-ups. If you use more t Continue reading >>

Forgot To Take Lantus..what Should I Do?

Forgot To Take Lantus..what Should I Do?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I was at a party the other night, and I honestly forgot to take my Lantus. I wasent quite sure what to do the next morning, so I just decided to check my sugars at random parts of the day, and just use my correction dosage. But I also realized that I am still in the honeymoon period, so its not like I had NO insulin in me whatso ever. If you guys have any suggestions or better steps to take for me to take if I ever forget to take it again, pleaseeeee tell me. Thanks If it were me, I would just monitor and cover all day until my normal shot time. I'd probably also be taking it twice a day, as from what I read it seems to work better that way, and would also cut down on the severity of a missed shot. It has been awhile since I used lantus, but I probably would have gone with a split dose and then checked all day long and corrected. I've done this before when I was taking my Lantus before bed. Woke up about 3AM and remembered that I had not taken my shot before bed. Checked my bg to be sure and sure enough, middle 300's !!! Called one of our local ER's and to tell you the truth, they were NOT much help. When I explained my situation, their response was "Well, we don't think it would hurt you to take it now but we really aren't advising you one way or the other." I was like WTF?? Aren't they supposed to be there to help you?? I finally was able to get in touch with my CDE through the hospital and he told me to go ahead and take it but to monitor the next 24 hrs very closely. My suggestion would be to discuss this with your endo. It's best to know what to do before a situation arises. i'm pretty s Continue reading >>

What Is Levemir (insulin Detemir)?

What Is Levemir (insulin Detemir)?

Levemir is the brand name for the prescription drug insulin detemir. It's used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Levemir is a long-acting insulin that lowers blood sugar by encouraging tissues to take excess glucose, discouraging the body from making more glucose, preventing the breakdown of fat and protein, and helping the body regulate levels of blood sugar. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Levemir in 2006. Novo Nordisk manufactures the drug. Levemir FlexTouch Levemir FlexTouch is an insulin pen syringe prefilled with Levemir. It's designed to make the drug easier to use. You should keep unopened Levemir FlexTouch in the refrigerator until you’re ready to use it. After opening, store it at room temperature no warmer than 86 degrees Fahrenheit. You should dispose of FlexTouch 42 days after opening, regardless of whether or not there is any left in the device. Levemir versus Lantus Levemir is similar to another man-made form of insulin, insuline glargine, which is sold under the brand name Lantus. Both drugs have similar side effects and have been to be effective at managing blood sugar levels in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor about which drug is better for you. Levemir Warnings You should not take Levemir if: You’re allergic to Levemir or any other ingredient in the drug Your blood sugar is low Talk to your doctor before taking Levemir if: You’re sick, stressed, or have an infection You have kidney or liver problems The potassium level in your blood is low Your doctor may lower your dose of Levemir if you are taking certain drugs, such as exenatide (Bydureon), liraglutide (Victoza), or albiglutide (Tanzeum). Levemir Storage You can store unopened vials of Levemir at room temperature or in the refrigerator, but toss a Continue reading >>

How Much Do Forgotten Insulin Injections Matter To Hemoglobin A1c In People With Diabetes? A Simulation Study

How Much Do Forgotten Insulin Injections Matter To Hemoglobin A1c In People With Diabetes? A Simulation Study

Go to: Forgotten or omitted insulin injections are an important contributing factor to poor glycemic control in people with type 1 diabetes. This study uses mathematical modeling and examines the impact on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels if insulin injections are forgotten. The simulation concerns people with type 1 diabetes on intensive insulin therapy. Five sets of blood glucose profiles with and without a forgotten injection were obtained. The difference to HbA1c was calculated using an HbA1c estimator on the profiles and was multiplied by the frequency of forgotten events. A frequency of 2.1 forgotten injections per week was found in the literature. Calculations showed that forgetting 2.1 meal-related injections per week would lead to an increase in HbA1c of at least 0.3–0.4% points, and similarly 0.2–0.3% points related to forgotten injections of the long-acting insulin. In case of even more pronounced nonadherence (e.g., if 39% of all injections are forgotten) there is a possible increase of HbA1c of 1.8% points. The magnitude of the possible improvement in HbA1c agrees well with other studies in the relation between adherence and HbA1c levels. The estimated numbers suggest that missing injections are an important reason for suboptimal treatment. Keywords: adherence, compliance, HbA1c, self-treatment Continue reading >>

Lantus

Lantus

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. (lant-us) What is in this leaflet It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using Lantus against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. What Lantus is used for Lantus is used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is a modified insulin that is very similar to human insulin. It is a substitute for the insulin produced by the pancreas. Lantus is a long-acting insulin. Your doctor may tell you to use a rapid-acting human insulin or oral diabetes medication in combination with Lantus. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Lantus has been prescribed for you. Before you use Lantus When you must not use Lantus Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include: If you have a lot of hypos discuss appropriate treatment with your doctor. After the expiry date printed on the pack or if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering. If you use Lantus after the expiry date has passed, it may not work as well. If it has expired or is damaged, return it to your pharmacist for disposal. If the product appears cloudy, discoloured or contains particles, or if the injection pen/cartridge/vial appears damaged. If you are not sure whether you should start using this medicine, talk to your doctor. There is no experience with the use of Lantus in children less than 6 years. Before you start to use Lantus Tell your doctor if you have allergies to any other medicines, foo Continue reading >>

Missing Insulin Injections

Missing Insulin Injections

Tweet Missed insulin injections are much more of a pain than the injections themselves and can cause a headache as to what effect a late injection will have and what dose should be administered. We look at this common problem and provide some guidance. Always remember that if you are at all unsure what to do, you should contact your health team for advice rather than risk making a mistake. In this article, when it says contact your health team, note that you may need to contact your out of hours service if your health team is not available. Common causes of missed injections Commonly cited reasons for missed injections include: Forgetting to take insulin Oversleeping Not having your injection kit with you Running out of insulin Having a fear of needles Deliberately missing insulin If you have problems with forgetting injections, see our forgetting injections guide dedicated to help prevent problems with forgetting to inject and if you forget whether you have injected or not. What to do if an insulin injection is missed There is not a set rule of what to do if an injection is missed as it can depend on how long ago the injection was meant to be administered and what type of insulin was to be taken. We provide some general tips but if you are in doubt, it is best to consult your health team and follow their advice. If long term/basal insulin was forgotten If you forget to take your long term insulin (basal insulin) and you realise relatively soon, it should usually be fine to inject your usual dose if the dose is given within 2 hours of when it should have been done. In this case, you’ll need to be aware that the injection was taken later and so the insulin will also be active in your body later than it would usually be. In some cases this could increase the chance of h Continue reading >>

Insulin For Gestational Diabetes - What It Is And How It Works

Insulin For Gestational Diabetes - What It Is And How It Works

Where blood sugar levels cannot be lowered and stabilised enough through dietary and lifestyle changes, or through using medication such as Metformin, some ladies will be required to use insulin for gestational diabetes. Insulin is a hormone in the body produced by the pancreas. Your body uses insulin to move the sugar (glucose) obtained from food and drink from the bloodstream into cells throughout the body. The cells are then able to use the sugar for energy. Here are the most commonly asked Q&A on insulin for gestational diabetes from our Facebook support group Why do I need to take insulin for gestational diabetes? If lower blood sugar levels cannot be reached through diet, exercise and medication such as Metformin, then many will be required insulin for gestational diabetes. If blood sugar levels remain high, then the diabetes is not controlled and can cause major complications with the pregnancy and baby. If your levels are rising out of target range, your own insulin production may need to be topped up at the meal time. You may need to take insulin at one or all of your meals. Sometimes the insulin you produce in-between your meals and overnight may also require a top up. This may mean that you require an extra slower-release insulin at bedtime and/or in the morning. Some consultants will prescribe insulin on diagnosis of gestational diabetes on the basis of your GTT results or following other complications relating to gestational diabetes. For the majority, you will be given some time to try diet and exercise changes and then medication such as Metformin before insulin is introduced as a way to help lower and control your levels. NICE guidelines for timing and use of insulin for gestational diabetes 1.2.19 Offer a trial of changes in diet and exercise to women w Continue reading >>

Forgot To Take Insulin

Forgot To Take Insulin

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Help! Last night I forgot to take my insulin shot with my dinner. I didn't realise until I went to bed and I tested my blood sugar level before taking the long acting insulin and my test was 14.2. This morning everything was normal. I have only been type 1 for 1 month, I was having dinner with friends and having a great time etc and just didn't even think about it. I feel so stupid, who forgets to give themself insulin?? this is my life now, how could I be so irresponsible. I was too frightened to give the shot hours after dinner so just gave the long acting. What are you supposed to do when this happens? This happens to all of us probably at least once. You are lucky in that you are probably still in your honeymoon period...meaning you still produce some insulin on your own. That's probqably why you woke up with a normal reading. Also the long acting insulin probably helped to prevent you from goin too high. What I would have done is tested after dinner and then corrected the high. Then I would wait two hours and see where my blood sugar is, it it is an acceptabel number, I would then go to bed. You don't want your blood sugar to stay too high over an extended periiod of time, it's best to try and lower the blood sugar as soon as you can. I wouldn't worry too much about it, it happens. Sometimes there's just too much going on and we get occupied with other things or just forget. We are all humans and make mistakes, we learn from these things. I'm glad that things we're better this morning for you and hope the rest of the day continued on to be good for you as well. As you can see from all of Continue reading >>

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