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Fastest Acting Insulin

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Snails Provide Fast-acting Therapeutic Insulin

University of Utah, United States, researchers have found that the structure of an insulin molecule produced by predatory cone snails may be an improvement over current fast-acting therapeutic insulin. The finding suggests that the cone snail insulin, produced by the snails to stun their prey, could begin working in as few as five minutes, compared with 15 minutes for the fastest-acting insulin currently available. Biologist Helena Safavi, co-author on a paper describing the cone snail insulin published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, said that studying complex venom cocktails can open doors to new drug discoveries. “You look at what venoms animals make to affect the physiology of their prey, and you use that as a starting point,” she says. “You can get new ideas from venoms. To have something that has already been evolved — that’s a huge advantage.” Along with colleagues from Australia, U biochemists Danny Chou and Maria Disotuar, and biologists Joanna Gajewiak and Baldomero Olivera contributed to the study. Also, organophosphates (OP), the most frequently used insecticides worldwide, could induce high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and glucose intolerance when Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Lucywestie

    A friend of mines son has Diabetes and as such has to travel with his meds in his carry on. They will be going to Scotland in August and Im wondering what is the best and legitimate way to keep the Insulin cool for the flights.
    I have heard of everything from bags of ice that will melt enroute to the permanent Ice packs. Just wondering what others do that travel regularly with meds that have to be kept cold. Bear in mind that they also have to keep approximately 2 weeks worth cool so that they have enough while on their holiday.
    Thanks
    Pete

  2. emel49

    Why not ask the FA to keep it in the fridge in the galley?

  3. TravellerPlus

    I work in a hospital. The Pharmacy suppiles our insulins to the medication refrigerator, but the bottles are labelled good for 28 days when stored at room temp; the CPS agrees (even for insulin glargine [Lantus] which we used to keep cool at all times).
    Your friend should double check with her Pharmacist, but I suspect that the insulin should be fine if not kept in a fridge whilst on board the plane.

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