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Fastest Acting Insulin

New Fast-acting Mealtime Insulin, Fiasp®, Now Approved And Available In Canada For The Treatment Of Diabetes

New Fast-acting Mealtime Insulin, Fiasp®, Now Approved And Available In Canada For The Treatment Of Diabetes

Faster absorption of insulin key for Canadians living with diabetes Approximately 11 million Canadians live with diabetes or prediabetes and that number is set to increase to more than 13 million by 2026.3 Diabetes can lead to serious complications if left untreated or improperly managed, including heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, blindness and amputation.4 Achieving optimal glycemic control is recommended by Diabetes Canada to reduce the incidence and slow the progression of diabetes-related complications.5 Yet, limiting postprandial (post-meal) glycemic (PPG) excursions has been one of the most challenging aspects in achieving adequate glycemic control.6 Fiasp® is an innovative formulation of insulin aspart that more closely matches the natural physiological insulin response of a person without diabetes, after a meal, compared with NovoRapid® (conventional insulin aspart).7 Fiasp® also has the option of a flexible dosing regimen (up to two minutes before a meal and up to 20 minutes after starting a meal), without compromising overall glycemic control or safety.1,8 "People living with diabetes often struggle to control blood glucose around mealtimes, which can be extremely challenging and result in debilitating diabetes-related complications," said Dr. Rémi Rabasa-Lhoret, endocrinologist at the Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal and onset® investigator*. "With the approval of a faster-acting insulin, one that is closer to the natural physiological insulin response of a person without diabetes, we can further support people in managing their blood glucose levels around meals, which may help prevent hyperglycemia, for instance, a condition that can cause serious complications for people living with diabetes." Fiasp® is absorbed faster than NovoRapid Continue reading >>

A Newer, Faster-acting Insulin? (faster Than Novolog!)

A Newer, Faster-acting Insulin? (faster Than Novolog!)

New findings from phase 3a trials show that a faster-acting insulin aspart by Novo Nordisk reduced A1c levels and improved after meal blood sugars in people with type 1 and 2 diabetes compared with NovoLog. These findings were presented at the 76th annual Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in New Orleans. Novolog (also marketed as Novorapid) is a fast-acting insulin aspart. The trial involves 2,100 people with type 1 and 2 diabetes and an even faster-acting insulin aspart. The trial consisted of 26 weeks of randomized therapy using a faster-acting insulin aspart which showed statistically significantly improved A1c in adults with type 1 diabetes when dosed at mealtime compared with Novolog. A similar result in A1c improvement was found when the insulin aspart was dosed 20 minutes after a meal compared with Novolog. What is Faster-Acting Insulin Aspart? Faster-acting insulin aspart is a fast acting bolus or mealtime insulin in investigation stages developed by Novo Nordisk. It is also insulin aspart like Novolog (or Novorapid) but in a new formulation which includes a vitamin and an amino acid intended to increase the initial absorption rate and provide a faster and earlier blood sugar lowering effect. “Novo Nordisk has submitted the regulatory filing for faster-acting insulin aspart in the United States and in the European Union.” How Did the Faster-Acting Insulin Aspart Work in Type 1 Diabetics? The trial also showed a reduction in 2-hour PPG increment versus Novolog. In addition, 1-hour PPG increment was also reduced. The 2-hour PPG increment is the difference between the plasma glucose value at 120 minutes after a standard meal test and the fasting plasma glucose value. The 1-h PPG increment is the difference between the plasma glucose Continue reading >>

The Four Fast Acting Insulins Have Different Activity Curves

The Four Fast Acting Insulins Have Different Activity Curves

Fasting acting insulin is the insulin you inject to cover the rise in your blood sugar that occurs after you eat a meal. They are called "fast acting" because unlike the basal insulins, Lantus and Levemir, they are absorbed relatively quickly after injection. This is what makes it possible to use these fast acting insulins to cover a meal. In theory, if you can figure out how many grams of carbohydrate one unit of fast acting insulin will cover, and if you can figure out how to estimate the number of grams of carbohydrate on your plate, you can match the insulin to the meal and get normal blood sugars. In practice this is harder than it sounds. It's tough to figure out how many grams of carb one unit will cover, especially since this amount may be different at different times of day. It is also hard to estimate how many grams of carbohydrate are actually on your plate. We'll discuss both these issues in some future blog posting. What I want to discuss here is the speed and duration with which each of the fast acting insulins acts. This is what is called its "Activity Curve." The most important qualities of the activity curve are: 1. When the insulin reaches its fullest strength. This is also known as when the insulin "peaks." Ideally you would like the insulin to peak at the time when the carbohydrates from your meal hit your blood stream. That way most of the insulin meets most of the carbs. 2. How long the insulin stays active. Because insulin is being absorbed from the subcutaneous fat into which you injected it, it isn't all absorbed at once, so it typically takes anywhere from three to eight hours for the complete dose of a fast acting insulin to be used up. When you get a vial or pen full of insulin, it will usually include the Prescribing Information for the insu Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Topic Overview Insulin is used to treat people who have diabetes. Each type of insulin acts over a specific amount of time. The amount of time can be affected by exercise, diet, illness, some medicines, stress, the dose, how you take it, or where you inject it. The table below is a general guide. Your results may be different. Insulin strength is usually U-100 (or 100 units of insulin in one milliliter of fluid). Short-acting (regular) insulin is also available in U-500. This is five times more concentrated than U-100 regular insulin. Long-acting insulin (glargine) is also available in U-300. This is three times more concentrated than U-100 long-acting insulin. Be sure to check the concentration of your insulin so you take the right amount. Insulin is made by different companies. Make sure you use the same type of insulin consistently. Types of insulin Type Examples Appearance When it starts to work (onset) The time of greatest effect (peak) How long it lasts (duration) Rapid-acting insulins work over a narrow, more predictable range of time. Because they work quickly, they are used most often at the start of a meal. Rapid-acting insulin acts most like insulin that is produced by the human pancreas. It quickly drops the blood sugar level and works for a short time. If a rapid-acting insulin is used instead of a short-acting insulin at the start of dinner, it may prevent severe drops in blood sugar level in the middle of the night. Apidra (glulisine), Humalog (lispro), Novolog (aspart) Clear 5-30 minutes 30 minutes-3 hours 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin also comes in a form that can be inhaled through the mouth. Afrezza (insulin human, inhaled) Contained in a cartridge 10-15 minutes 30-90 minutes 2½-3 hours Short-acting insulins take effect and wear off more quickly tha Continue reading >>

Fast-acting Insulin – Is Humalog For Everyone?

Fast-acting Insulin – Is Humalog For Everyone?

Like many people with diabetes, Ted Wright doesn’t always wait 30-40 minutes to eat after injecting his regular insulin. “Ideally, I should wait,” said Wright, a bit sheepishly, “but I just don’t have the time.” Living with diabetes is hassle enough, so counting the minutes before mealtime is not always a priority; it’s just not convenient. Wright is not alone. Current studies suggest that nearly 50 percent of all insulin users are willing to run the risk of fluctuating blood sugars by injecting closer to mealtime. But with the advent of Lispro, the fastest-acting insulin on the market, waiting, and the risks of injecting too soon before meals, may be a thing of the past. Lispro, brand-named Humalog, is designed to mimic the body’s natural insulin output in response to eating. Because of its rapid action, patients can take Lispro 15 minutes before meals, instead of waiting like they should with regular insulin. Using Lispro, “it’s easier to be impulsive without getting high blood sugars,” Wright said. There’s less trouble when you go out to a restaurant, no more taking your insulin at home or in the car. You can take it right at the table. But Lispro’s fast-acting ways-the very quality the new insulin is touted for-is what scares some people most. If there’s not enough food in the system when Lispro goes to work, blood sugars can drop fast. The result? A severe hypoglycemic episode. “What happens if the phone rings and the baby cries in the middle of a meal, thus delaying eating after injecting Lispro? Is there enough time to deal with it when the insulin acts so quickly?” wonders Jenny Hirst, co-chair of England’s Insulin Dependent Diabetes Trust. Physicians say this has not been a problem for people who used the new insulin during the Continue reading >>

Fast-acting Insulin Drugs Transforming Diabetes Treatment

Fast-acting Insulin Drugs Transforming Diabetes Treatment

New ‘fast-acting’ insulin drugs, used to treat millions of diabetics worldwide and which generate billions in sales annually, stem directly from work carried out in laboratories at the University of York. Diabetes is a chronic disease that is becoming a growing burden in both developed and developing countries. Type 1 diabetes requires a daily dose of the hormone insulin to regulate the body’s blood sugar levels. Research at the world-class York Structural Biology Laboratory (YSBL) led to the development of fast-acting insulin. Launched in 1999, these drugs mean diabetes patients need only administer one daily intravenous injection and are now the standard treatment for Type 1 diabetes for 35 million patients worldwide. YSBL’s extensive collaborative research with Novo-Nordisk, the Danish multinational pharmaceutical company, saw combined sales of the insulin drugs totalling over $6 billion in 2012 alone. Insights from YSBL’s research are also expected to impact on the design of further forms of insulin in years to come. This includes the prospect of insulin that can be taken orally, which could transform diabetes care once again. Continue reading >>

Fiasp(r) A New Ultra-fast Acting Mealtime Insulin Is Available For The Treatment Of Diabetes In Adults

Fiasp(r) A New Ultra-fast Acting Mealtime Insulin Is Available For The Treatment Of Diabetes In Adults

BAGSVAERD, Denmark, Mar. 27 /PRNewswire-AsiaNet/-- - Canada first country to launch Fiasp(R) - This material is intended for global medical media only. - For journalistic assessment and preparation before publication. Today, Novo Nordisk announced that Fiasp(R), a new, fast-acting mealtime insulin for the treatment of diabetes in adults, has been launched in Canada, following the recent marketing authorisation from Health Canada on 6 January 2017. Fiasp(R) is insulin aspart in an innovative formulation that more closely matches the natural physiological insulin response of a person without diabetes after a meal, compared with NovoRapid(R) (conventional insulin aspart)[1]. Fiasp(R) also has the option of a flexible dosing regimen (up to 20 minutes after starting a meal), without compromising overall glycaemic control, when compared to NovoRapid(R) dosed at mealtime [2],[3]. "The launch of Fiasp(R) in Canada represents the first new mealtime insulin in 10 years. We hope to make this innovation available to as many people with diabetes as possible worldwide," said Mads Krogsgaard Thomsen, executive vice president and chief science officer of Novo Nordisk. "The goal of any insulin treatment is to match the natural physiological insulin production we see in people without diabetes, both in speed and glycaemic control. Fiasp(R) has narrowed the existing gap, getting us closer to that goal." Fiasp(R) is absorbed faster than NovoRapid(R), appearing twice as fast in the bloodstream after injection[1],[3], which leads to improved glycaemic control after a meal [2],[4]. In clinical trials, Fiasp(R) demonstrated improved overall glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes[2] and comparable overall glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes[4], versus NovoRapid(R). Results also showed improved m Continue reading >>

New Ultra-rapid-acting Insulin Formulation

New Ultra-rapid-acting Insulin Formulation

BIOD-531 is a new ultra-rapid-acting insulin formulation that has been shown to work better than current therapies at treating diabetes in a mid-stage trial…. BIOD-531 is an ultra-rapid-acting formulation of recombinant human insulin (RHI) at a concentration of 400 units/ml (U-400) combined with EDTA, citrate and magnesium sulfate. In the Phase 1 Study 3-150, the results of which were released in February 2014, BIOD-531 administered to non-diabetic, obese volunteers demonstrated ultra-rapid absorption and onset of action in comparison with Humalog Mix 75/25 and Humulin R U-500, and had an extended duration of action that is expected to be suitable for basal insulin needs. The recently completed Study 3-152 was designed to test the hypothesis that a single dose of BIOD-531 would confer better postprandial glucose control for two consecutive meals compared to Humalog Mix 75/25 when administered to type 2 diabetes patients with moderate insulin resistance. In Study 3-152, glucose profiles were assessed after single subcutaneous injection of 0.6 U/kg doses of the study drugs administered with a standardized breakfast on separate days in a randomized four arm cross-over sequence in which subjects received pre-meal BIOD-531, pre-meal Humalog Mix 75/25, pre-meal Humulin R U-500 and post meal BIOD-531. In order to assess the duration of glucose lowering, subjects received a standardized lunch at 330 minutes (5.5 hours) after breakfast dosing with no insulin administered at that time. Glucose levels were measured every five minutes during the 720 minutes (12 hours) after test insulin dosing at breakfast. The results of the current study demonstrate that the ultra-rapid-acting profile with an extended duration of action of BIOD-531 seen in Study 3-150 may translate into clinica Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin And How They Work

Types Of Insulin And How They Work

Insulin is a hormone the body makes to control the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood. It lowers blood sugar by allowing glucose to leave the bloodstream and enter body cells. Without enough insulin, the level of glucose in the bloodstream can become too high. Everyone needs insulin to use food properly. People without diabetes make enough of their own insulin to keep their blood sugar at healthy levels all the time. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin of their own. Instead, they need to take shots of one or more types of insulin to keep their blood sugars close to normal. Between 75 and 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes need to take insulin shots to help them get the best control of their blood sugar levels. Deciding How Much Insulin to Take The amount of insulin a person needs depends on: Body weight Percentage of body fat Activity level Diet Other medicines Emotions and stress General health Type of insulin When you first start taking insulin shots, your doctor might ask you to change the amount you take or the time you take it several times. You and your doctor will base these changes on the results of your blood sugar tests. You'll need to make adjustments until you find the dose and schedule that work best for you. Each person's need for insulin is different: Some people can control their blood sugar with one shot of insulin a day. Most people need more than three shots every day. Many people need more than one type of insulin. If you take several insulin shots a day or use more than one type of insulin, it doesn't mean your diabetes isn't in good control. Your blood sugar, not the amount or type of insulin you take, is the best way to judge how well you are doing. If you take three shots a day and your blood sugar is near normal, that's Continue reading >>

Cone Snail Venom Could Inspire Fast-acting Insulin For Diabetes

Cone Snail Venom Could Inspire Fast-acting Insulin For Diabetes

Forget slow and steady. For the cone snail, it’s fast-acting chemistry that wins the race. Researchers have now shed light on the structure of a speedy insulin that cone snails use to paralyze prey. This was an early-stage study conducted in test tubes rather than in living things. However, its findings could give drugmakers clues for developing new, quicker-acting insulin for people with diabetes. You don’t want to mess with cone snails. These undersea predators stun prey with a harpoon-like appendage that injects venom, or they release immobilizing venoms into nearby water. Scientists have been studying venoms, which are complex chemical brews, for decades. Venoms typically contain an array of molecules that act on the nervous system. In fact, one small protein from a cone snail’s venom has become Ziconotide, an FDA-approved medication for severe pain. Our story begins last year, when researchers in Utah and Australia took a look at two specific snails, including the geographic cone snail Conus geographus. They noticed that the snails’ venom contained something surprising -- insulin. We humans think of insulin as a life-saving medication for people with diabetes. Insulin is a natural hormone that lowers our blood sugar, but people with diabetes can’t make it or don’t use it properly. In the snails, the scientists realized, “insulin can be subverted for nefarious biological purposes,” quickly putting prey in a coma by lowering its blood sugar, making it easier to capture. There were two fascinating things about that snail venom insulin. First, it was incredibly fast acting. And second, it had evolved to be a weapon of chemical warfare. It was more similar to fish insulin or human insulin than to anything you’d expect in a snail. The team decided to fi Continue reading >>

What Is Rapid Or Fast-acting Insulin?

What Is Rapid Or Fast-acting Insulin?

You may take rapid acting or fast acting insulin (also known as insulin analogues) for your diabetes, either through injections prior to your meals, or in your insulin pump. You may use it alone, or in combination with other insulins and diabetes medications, including injections and pills. In a person without diabetes, the pancreas puts out small amounts of insulin, continuously bringing down blood sugars to a normal level with no difficulty. When a person has diabetes, they may not make any insulin, as occurs in Type 1 Diabetes. They may make some insulin, but it’s not working well, and it’s just not enough to bring blood sugars into a normal range, as occurs in Type 2 Diabetes. When there is no insulin, or not enough insulin, the goal is to try to simulate what the body normally does to bring down blood sugars through injections of insulin, inhaled insulin, or via an insulin pump. To do this, rapid or fast acting insulin must be taken in relation to food that is eaten in many cases. Not everyone with diabetes must take insulin to control their blood sugars, though. Let’s learn how Christie uses rapid acting insulin… Christie’s story Christie has had Type 1 Diabetes for 24 years. She uses a Medtronic insulin pump. Every day, Christie’s pump gives her fast or rapid acting insulin. This is all that insulin pumps need to control blood sugar. For Christie, she uses Humalog lispro insulin. She gets a little bit of this rapid or fast acting insulin continually through her pump via a basal. She also gets some of this insulin through her pump, in a bolus dose every time she eats a meal. In a pump, the same insulin is used all the time, and it is always rapid insulin. Christie also has a new Continuous Glucose Monitor, CGM. She has found with this new technology, s Continue reading >>

The Fda Just Approved A New Form Of Insulin

The Fda Just Approved A New Form Of Insulin

Judith Garcia, 19, fills a syringe as she prepares to give herself an injection of insulin.AP Photo/Reed Saxon (Reuters) - The Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved Novo Nordisk's fast-acting insulin to treat diabetes. The product, known as Fiasp, is designed to help diabetics control post-meal spikes in blood sugar. It is already approved in Canada and Europe. Fiasp will have the same list price as NovoLog, Novo's own fast-acting insulin that got approved in 2000. Novo said in a news release that it'll be providing savings cards to patients that are eligible to help with co-pays. Fiasp, or faster acting insulin asparte, is designed to work faster than existing fast-acting insulin such as Eli Lilly and Co's Humalog and NovoLog, known as NovoRapid outside the United States. Last year the FDA declined to approve the product and requested additional information. Diabetes is a group of conditions in which the body can't properly regulate blood sugar that affects roughly 30 million people in the US. For many people living with diabetes — including the 1.25 million people in the US who have type-1 diabetes — injecting insulin is part of the daily routine. And the prices of those insulins have been rising — increases that mean some people are spending as much on monthly diabetes-related expenses as their mortgage payment. It's led some people living with diabetes to turn to the black market, crowdfunding pages, and Facebook pages to get access to the life-saving drug. (Reuters reporting by Toni Clarke) Continue reading >>

You Can Buy Insulin Without A Prescription, But Should You?

You Can Buy Insulin Without A Prescription, But Should You?

As anyone with diabetes can tell you, managing the disease with insulin usually means regular checkups at the doctor's office to fine-tune the dosage, monitor blood-sugar levels and check for complications. But here's a little known fact: Some forms of insulin can be bought without a prescription. Carmen Smith did that for six years when she didn't have health insurance and didn't have a primary care doctor. She bought her insulin without a prescription at Wal-Mart. "It's not like we go in our trench coat and a top hat, saying, 'Uh I need the insulin,' " says Smith, who lives in Cleveland. "The clerks usually don't know it's a big secret. They'll just go, 'Do we sell over-the-counter insulin?' " Once the pharmacist says yes, the clerk just goes to get it, Smith says. "And you purchase it and go about your business." But it's still a pretty uncommon purchase. Smith didn't learn from a doctor that she could buy insulin that way. In fact, many doctors don't know it's possible. When she no longer had insurance to help pay for doctors' appointments or medicine, Smith happened to ask at Wal-Mart if she could get vials of the medicine without a prescription. To figure out the dose, she just used the same amount a doctor had given her years before. It was a way to survive, she says, but no way to live. It was horrible when she didn't get the size of the dose or the timing quite right. "It's a quick high and then, it's a down," Smith says. "The down part is, you feel icky. You feel lifeless. You feel pain. And the cramps are so intense — till you can't walk, you can't sit, you can't stand." Smith says her guesswork put her in the emergency room a handful of times over the years. The availability of insulin over the counter presents a real conundrum. As Smith's experience shows Continue reading >>

Rapid Acting Insulin

Rapid Acting Insulin

Tweet Rapid acting insulins are usually taken just before or with a meal. They act very quickly to minimise the rise in blood sugar which follows eating. Rapid acting insulins are commonly prescribed to people with type 1 diabetes, however, there may be times when they can be prescribed for type 2 diabetes as well. As rapid acting insulins act very quickly, they can lead to an increased chance of hypoglycemia. Care should be therefore taken when dosing. What type of insulin is a rapid acting insulin? Rapid insulins, which are a type of insulin known as analogue insulins, can either be injected or delivered via an insulin pump. Humalog Humalog is an Eli Lilly product, with the active ingredient insulin lispro. It is extremely rapid-acting, and will typically begin to work within 15 minutes. Effects of the insulin last for between 2 and 5 hours. It is faster-acting than soluble insulin, and is therefore extremely useful around mealtimes. Like many other rapid-acting forms of insulin, humalog may be combined with intermediate or longer-acting insulin for a longer period of blood glucose maintenance. Novorapid The active ingredient in Novorapid is insulin aspart. When novorapid is injected, it is extremely fast-acting, and works rapidly to normalise blood sugar levels. It typically begins working after 10-20 minutes, and will last for between 3 and 5 hours. It may be injected before a meal, and sometimes immediately after, to ensure strict control of post-prandial levels. Often, insulin aspart formulations such as novorapid will be combined with other longer lasting (intermediate-acting and longer-acting) insulin. In this way, control over blood glucose levels can be maintained throughout the day. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperg Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro (intravenous Route, Subcutaneous Route)

Insulin Lispro (intravenous Route, Subcutaneous Route)

Description and Brand Names Drug information provided by: Micromedex US Brand Name Humalog Lispro-PFC Descriptions Insulin lispro is a fast-acting type of insulin. Insulin is one of many hormones that help the body turn the food we eat into energy. This is done by using the glucose (sugar) in the blood as quick energy. Also, insulin helps us store energy that we can use later. When you have diabetes mellitus, your body cannot make enough or does not use insulin properly. So, you must take additional insulin to regulate your blood sugar and keep your body healthy. This is very important as too much sugar in your blood can be harmful to your health. Insulin lispro starts to work faster than some other types of insulin, and its effects do not last as long. It should act more like the insulin your body would normally produce. Because the effects of insulin lispro are short-acting, your doctor may also prescribe a longer-acting insulin for you to use. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms: Suspension Copyright © 2017 Truven Health Analytics Inc. All rights reserved. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. Continue reading >>

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