diabetestalk.net

Fastest Acting Insulin

Share on facebook

New Treatment That Improves Control Of Diabetes At Mealtimes Now Available In Uk

A new, fast-acting mealtime insulin for adults living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes has been launched in the UK. Fast-acting insulin aspart (Fiasp) is a formulation that more closely matches the natural physiological insulin response of a person without diabetes, after meals, compared with the rapid-acting insulin, insulin aspart (NovoRapid). Fast-acting insulin aspart will be made available to the NHS at no additional cost versus conventional insulin aspart and may help patients tighten the control of their blood sugar levels after meals. Professor David Russell-Jones, Consultant Physician at the Royal Surrey County Hospital, and Professor of Diabetes and Endocrinology at the University of Surrey, said: “Managing blood sugar levels around mealtimes can be challenging for those living with diabetes. Mealtime insulins are usually taken by patients before eating to effectively reduce the meal-associated rise in blood sugar. Poor control of blood sugar levels over the long-term can lead to serious and costly long-term complications such as amputation and blindness. So the availability of this fast-acting insulin aspart—that more closely matches a healthy body’s physiological re Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. John1960

    Do I need a prescription to get insulin or syringes?
    In all states new, insulin analogs DO require a prescription. These include Humalog, Novolog, or Apidra, as well as Lantus.
    Note 1 for chart below: Older insulins such as regular (R) do not need a prescription except in Alaska. The chart below only specifies if older insulins require a prescription.
    IOH - State Prescription Laws for Syringes and Insulin

  2. Magnum Mike

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by John1960
    Do I need a prescription to get insulin or syringes?
    In all states new, insulin analogs DO require a prescription. These include Humalog, Novolog, or Apidra, as well as Lantus.
    Note 1 for chart below: Older insulins such as regular (R) do not need a prescription except in Alaska. The chart below only specifies if older insulins require a prescription.
    IOH - State Prescription Laws for Syringes and Insulin
    John, it's been that way for a long time. If I remember correctly, I didn't need prescriptions to get insulin vials, or syringes, at least here in Arizona, up until sometime in the mid 1990s.
    This is one of those "a few bad apples ruin it for the rest of us" situations. They started requiring prescriptions for syringes because too many people, who did not have diabetes, were getting them to use for illegal drugs.

  3. SouthernBelleInUtah

    I have found that Wal-Mart sells the cheapest insulin w/o a prescription. They have their own brand, Relion, of Novalin that they sell for $24.+ per vial. With a prescription, the brand Novalin sells for $45 per vial. So, I always go to Wal-Mart.
    I was on all the new stuff at $85/vial until I hit the Medicare donut hole. I spend $250/mo as it is on insulin. I can't afford $800-900/mo on just insulin, so my doctor called around for me to find the cheapest.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close
Share on facebook

Fda Delays Us Approval Of Novo Nordisk’s Faster-acting Insulin Aspart, Issuing A Crl

Danish diabetes care giant Novo Nordisk revealed on Friday that it has received a Complete Response Letter… To continue reading this article and to access exclusive features, interviews, round-ups and commentary from the sharpest minds in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology space you need to be logged into the site and have an active subscription or trial subscription. Please login or subscribe in order to continue reading. Claim a week's trial subscription by signing up for free today and receive our daily pharma and biotech news bulletin free of charge, forever. Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Anonymous

    Sensitivity factor??

    Hey everyone! I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 4 months ago at the age of 26, 5'3, 128 lbs and am now on the omnipod. I feel so overwhelmed and recently saw the first signs of coming out of my "honeymoon". My doctor decreased my sensitivity factor from 60 to 50. Why did this help bring my numbers down back to normal? Could I bring this number down a little more therefore decreasing my hourly basal dose? I feel like I'm slowly putting on weight and would really like to limit my basal as much as possible. What do yall do?? Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks so much.

  2. HRG617

    My sensitivity factor was 60 then they changed it to 50 because I am coming out of my honeymoon and it helped so much but I didn't need to increase my insulin needs at all. I still use about 9 units of insulin (novolog) total daily. So my question was if I changed it to 40, therefore making me a little more sensitive, could I essentially decrease my insulin from 9 units a day to maybe 7 but still being healthy and staying in range?. I eat really well, all veggies and meat but I do have my cheat moments and when I cheat, it seems I have gained 5 pounds. I will certainly get that book. Thank u. What is your basal? Are u on a pump ?

  3. Type1Lou

    Changing the "sensitivity factor" setting in your pump will not make you more sensitive to insulin. Your pump setting for sensitivity is based on your own metabolism and how your body reacts to insulin. You should be working with your doctor to determine what the correct sensitivity setting is for you. Per Gary Scheiner in his book "Think Like a Pancreas", "your sensitivity factor is how much each unit of insulin lowers your blood sugar. Each person's sensitivity to insulin is unique." He has a neat chart in his book to illustrate the concept.
    I've edited my post to add more from Gary Scheiner. He states "Sensitivity factors may also change over time. With weight gain, most people lose some sensitivity to insulin, and the sensitivity factor tends to decrease. Changes in physical activities can also affect insulin sensitivity. Prolonged periods of inactivity…may lower insulin sensitivity and require a reduction in the sensitivity factor. Long-term increases in activity can produce the opposite effect. " I interpret this to mean that if you want to increase your insulin sensitivity, consider increasing your activity level, and reaching your target weight. Hope this helps some.
    I started using a Medtronic Minimed Paradigm pump in August 2011 after years of MDI. My basal ranges from .10 units per hour to .55 units per hour depending on the time of day. My carb to insulin ratio runs from 25 grams of carb per unit of insulin to 33 grams of carb per unit of insulin depending upon the time of day.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close
Share on facebook

Snails Provide Fast-acting Therapeutic Insulin

University of Utah, United States, researchers have found that the structure of an insulin molecule produced by predatory cone snails may be an improvement over current fast-acting therapeutic insulin. The finding suggests that the cone snail insulin, produced by the snails to stun their prey, could begin working in as few as five minutes, compared with 15 minutes for the fastest-acting insulin currently available. Biologist Helena Safavi, co-author on a paper describing the cone snail insulin published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, said that studying complex venom cocktails can open doors to new drug discoveries. “You look at what venoms animals make to affect the physiology of their prey, and you use that as a starting point,” she says. “You can get new ideas from venoms. To have something that has already been evolved — that’s a huge advantage.” Along with colleagues from Australia, U biochemists Danny Chou and Maria Disotuar, and biologists Joanna Gajewiak and Baldomero Olivera contributed to the study. Also, organophosphates (OP), the most frequently used insecticides worldwide, could induce high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and glucose intolerance when Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. KlimtOphile

    Hi Everyone!
    does anyone have a list of what category the hormones fall under? hydrophobic or hydrophilic? I know steroids are hydrophobic, and that epinephrine is an aa derived hydrophillic and insulin is a polypeptide hydrophillic -- how about theother ones???
    also! i have PR test 4902 solutions only~ Can anyone give me a copy of the actual test? I lost it a while back when i took the PR course! Thanks !!!!!
    Best of luck to everyone!!!!!

  2. DrChandy

    KlimtOphile said:
    Hi Everyone!
    does anyone have a list of what category the hormones fall under? hydrophobic or hydrophilic? I know steroids are hydrophobic, and that epinephrine is an aa derived hydrophillic and insulin is a polypeptide hydrophillic -- how about theother ones???
    also! i have PR test 4902 solutions only~ Can anyone give me a copy of the actual test? I lost it a while back when i took the PR course! Thanks !!!!!
    Best of luck to everyone!!!!! Just know the various hormones and what they do (and the mechanisms by which some of them function). If you are required to know about the hydrophilicity or hydrophobicity of a hormone, it will be presented to you in the context of a passage. Good luck.

  3. gotgame83

    Of the top of my head if its cholestrol based its phobic and if its peptide/amino based then its phillic. Some sample peptide based are like t3/t4 catacholamines hGH HCG etc

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Long Acting And Short Acting Insulin

    What’s the difference between the different types of insulin? Long-acting, short-acting, premixed, learn more about all three. You may have a lot of questions as you begin insulin therapy. What are the different types of insulin available? Which should I be using and when? Insulins differ based on 3 key factors: 1 how quickly they work when they peak how long they last (duration) This table compares these factors in the types of insulin availab ...

    insulin Jan 20, 2018
  • Fastest Acting Insulin

    Fasting acting insulin is the insulin you inject to cover the rise in your blood sugar that occurs after you eat a meal. They are called "fast acting" because unlike the basal insulins, Lantus and Levemir, they are absorbed relatively quickly after injection. This is what makes it possible to use these fast acting insulins to cover a meal. In theory, if you can figure out how many grams of carbohydrate one unit of fast acting insulin will cover, ...

    insulin Jan 26, 2018
  • List The Steps For Mixing A Short Acting And Long Acting Insulin In The Same Syringe

    Intradermal injections (ID) are injections administered into the dermis, just below the epidermis. The ID injection route has the longest absorption time of all parenteral routes. These types of injections are used for sensitivity tests, such as TB (see Figure 7.13), allergy, and local anesthesia tests. The advantage of these tests is that the body reaction is easy to visualize, and the degree of reaction can be assessed. The most common sites us ...

    insulin Oct 21, 2018
  • What Is The Fastest Acting Insulin

    (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved Novo Nordisk’s fast-acting insulin to treat diabetes. The product, known as Fiasp, is designed to help diabetics control post-meal spikes in blood sugar. It is already approved in Canada and Europe. Fiasp, or faster acting insulin asparte, is designed to work faster than existing fast-acting insulin such as Eli Lilly and Co’s Humalog and Novo Nordisk’s own NovoLog, known a ...

    insulin Apr 28, 2018
  • Why Do You Draw Up Short Acting Insulin Before Long Acting?

    Why do I need to take insulin? When you digest food, your body changes most of the food you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells of your body and be used as energy. When you have diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use it properly, so the glucose builds up in your blood instead of moving into the cells. Too much glucose in the blood can lead to serious health problems. All ...

    insulin Oct 21, 2018
  • Which Is The Fastest Acting Insulin?

    Novo Nordisk has announced that their ultra-fast rapid-acting insulin aspart called Fiasp has been approved by the European Commission, covering all 28 European Union member states. According to a GlobeNewswire press release, Fiasp is a new-generation mealtime insulin that works faster and more like the natural physiological insulin response to meals. It has a similar safety profile to Novolog insulin in the US and NovoRapid in the UK and is appr ...

    insulin Apr 1, 2018

Popular Articles

More in insulin