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Fastest Acting Insulin

Fast-acting Insulin

Fast-acting Insulin

Even when you think you’re doing everything right with your diabetes care regimen, it can sometimes seem like your blood glucose levels are hard to control. One potential source of difficulty that you may not have thought of is how you time your injections or boluses of rapid-acting insulin with respect to meals. Since the first rapid-acting insulin, insulin lispro (brand name Humalog), came on the market in 1996, most diabetes experts have recommended taking it within 15 minutes of starting a meal (any time between 15 minutes before starting to eat to 15 minutes after starting to eat). This advice is based on the belief that rapid-acting insulin is absorbed quickly and begins lowering blood glucose quickly. However, several years of experience and observation suggest that this advice may not be ideal for everyone who uses rapid-acting insulin. As a result, the advice on when to take it needs updating. Insulin basics The goal of insulin therapy is to match the way that insulin is normally secreted in people without diabetes. Basal insulin. Small amounts of insulin are released by the pancreas 24 hours a day. On average, adults secrete about one unit of insulin per hour regardless of food intake. Bolus insulin. In response to food, larger amounts of insulin are secreted and released in two-phase boluses. The first phase starts within minutes of the first bite of food and lasts about 15 minutes. The second phase of insulin release is more gradual and occurs over the next hour and a half to three hours. The amount of insulin that is released matches the rise in blood glucose from the food that is eaten. In people with normal insulin secretion, insulin production and release is a finely tuned feedback system that maintains blood glucose between about 70 mg/dl and 140 mg/d Continue reading >>

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

If you have to take insulin to treat diabetes, there’s good news: You have choices. There are five types of insulin. They vary by onset (how soon they start to work), peak (how long they take to kick into full effect) and duration (how long they stay in your body). You may have to take more than one type of insulin, and these needs may change over time (and can vary depending on your type of diabetes). Find out more about the insulin types best for you. What it’s called: Humalog (lispro), NovoLog (aspart), Apidra (glulisine) Rapid-acting insulin is taken just before or after meals, to control spikes in blood sugar. This type is typically used in addition to a longer-acting insulin. It often works in 15 minutes, peaks between 30 and 90 minutes, and lasts 3 to 5 hours. “You can take it a few minutes before eating or as you sit down to eat, and it starts to work very quickly,” says Manisha Chandalia, MD, director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch, in Galveston. What it’s called: Humulin R, Novolin R Short-acting insulin covers your insulin needs during meals. It is taken about 30 minutes to an hour before a meal to help control blood sugar levels. This type of insulin takes effect in about 30 minutes to one hour, and peaks after two to four hours. Its effects tend to last about five to eight hours. “The biggest advantage of short-acting insulin is that you don't have to take it at each meal. You can take it at breakfast and supper and still have good control because it lasts a little longer,” Dr. Chandalia says. What it’s called: Humulin N (NPH), Novolin N (NPH) Intermediate-acting insulin can control blood sugar levels for about 12 hours or longer, so it can be used overnight. It begins to work within one to four hours, Continue reading >>

Compare Novolog Vs. Lantus

Compare Novolog Vs. Lantus

When used correctly, this medication will l lower blood sugar every time you use it and prevent the harmful, long-term effects of high sugar levels on your organs and blood vessels. You can easily change the dose of Novolog (insulin aspart) to fit your individual needs. Starting insulin early in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes can maintain your body's insulin-producing cells and slow down disease progression. Can use Novolog (insulin aspart) even if you have liver or kidney problems, unlike many other blood sugar-lowering medicines. Insulin is one of the most effective blood sugar-lowering medication and can lower your A1c (average blood sugar over time) by up to 2-3%. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day sugar control with just once or twice daily dosing. Dose can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Lantus (insulin glargine) can be used with liver or kidney problems. 177 reviews so far Have you used Novolog (insulin aspart)? Leave a review 584 reviews so far Have you used Lantus (insulin glargine)? Leave a review The Novolog (insulin aspart) FDA package insert doesn’t have numbers about how common side effects are. Continue reading >>

Injected Insulin

Injected Insulin

How it works: Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that stimulates cells in the body to remove glucose from the blood for storage or usage. Normally, insulin is released when the body has high amounts of sugar in the blood, such as after a meal, to bring levels back into a normal range. Who uses it: People with type 1 diabetes and some people with type 2 diabetes use insulin. In-Depth Article: Insulins Unplugged – an overview of the different varieties of insulin available today. Other articles: FDA Approves New Insulin Glargine Basaglar - First "Biosimilar" Insulin in the US Basal vs. Prandial: Insulins can be divided into two categories based on function: basal (long-acting insulin) and prandial (rapid-acting or “mealtime” insulin). Basal insulin is designed to be injected once or twice daily to provide a constant level of insulin action throughout the day. Basal insulin helps keep blood sugars at a consistent level when you are not eating, but it is not enough to cover glucose spikes after mealtime. Prandial insulins, on the other hand, are taken at mealtime and act rapidly on the body, serving to bring down the high sugar levels following meals. Analog vs. Human Insulin: There are also two types of insulin structures: human insulin and analog insulin. Human insulins were developed first and are essentially identical in structure to the insulin produced in the body. Analog insulins are similar in structure but have minor biological modifications to give them desirable properties. While analog insulins cost more, they generally lead to less hypoglycemia and weight gain. Prandial insulin analogs tend to act faster than human insulin. Approved Insulins: Basal/Long-Acting: Analog Lantus and Toujeo (insulin glargine) Levemir (insulin detemir) Tresiba (insul Continue reading >>

Fast-acting Insulin Drugs Transforming Diabetes Treatment

Fast-acting Insulin Drugs Transforming Diabetes Treatment

New ‘fast-acting’ insulin drugs, used to treat millions of diabetics worldwide and which generate billions in sales annually, stem directly from work carried out in laboratories at the University of York. Diabetes is a chronic disease that is becoming a growing burden in both developed and developing countries. Type 1 diabetes requires a daily dose of the hormone insulin to regulate the body’s blood sugar levels. Research at the world-class York Structural Biology Laboratory (YSBL) led to the development of fast-acting insulin. Launched in 1999, these drugs mean diabetes patients need only administer one daily intravenous injection and are now the standard treatment for Type 1 diabetes for 35 million patients worldwide. YSBL’s extensive collaborative research with Novo-Nordisk, the Danish multinational pharmaceutical company, saw combined sales of the insulin drugs totalling over $6 billion in 2012 alone. Insights from YSBL’s research are also expected to impact on the design of further forms of insulin in years to come. This includes the prospect of insulin that can be taken orally, which could transform diabetes care once again. Continue reading >>

Pharmacokinetic Properties Of Fast-acting Insulin Aspart Administered In Different Subcutaneous Injection Regions

Pharmacokinetic Properties Of Fast-acting Insulin Aspart Administered In Different Subcutaneous Injection Regions

Go to: Abstract Fast-acting insulin aspart (faster aspart) is insulin aspart set in a new formulation with faster initial absorption after subcutaneous administration. This study investigated the pharmacokinetic properties, including the absolute bioavailability, of faster aspart when administered subcutaneously in the abdomen, upper arm or thigh. In a randomised, open-label, crossover trial, 21 healthy male subjects received a single injection of faster aspart at five dosing visits: 0.2 U/kg subcutaneously in the abdomen, upper arm and thigh, intramuscularly in the thigh and 0.02 U/kg intravenously. Blood sampling for pharmacokinetics was performed pre-dose and frequently thereafter until 12 h post-dose (8 h after intravenous administration). Onset of appearance (~3 min), time to 50% of maximum concentration (t Early 50% Cmax; ~20 min) and time to maximum concentration (t max; ~55 min) were all similar between injection regions. Early exposure within the first 2 h after injection (AUCIAsp,0–1h and AUCIAsp,0–2h) as well as maximum concentration (C max) were comparable for the abdomen and upper arm, but were ~25% lower for the thigh as seen previously for other mealtime insulin products. Total exposure (AUCIAsp,0–t) was similar for the abdomen, upper arm and thigh, and absolute bioavailability was ~80% after subcutaneous administration of faster aspart in all three injection regions. The current study supports the ultra-fast pharmacokinetic characteristics of faster aspart across different injection regions, with administration in the abdomen and upper arm resulting in greater early exposure than in the thigh. Continue reading >>

The Scoop On Novo's New Faster-acting Fiasp Insulin

The Scoop On Novo's New Faster-acting Fiasp Insulin

There's a new ultra fast-acting insulin on the market internationally, and hopefully before long it will become available to us here in the U.S. too. You may have heard mention of FIASP, or Faster-Acting Insulin Aspart, that recently hit the market overseas and in Canada -- and been wondering what the deal is with this new super-fasting insulin. We put our ears to the ground to learn more about it, what PWDs (people with diabetes) who've started on this med are saying online, as well as what its manufacturer Novo Nordisk has to say about this new product that was just recently re-submitted to the FDA for consideration as a new type of medication. Here's what we've heard: Getting to Know FIASP What exactly is Faster-Acting Insulin Aspart? Remember, insulin aspart is the official scientific name for the synthetic insulin analog that sells under the brand Novolog here in the States and NovoRapid internationally. What's in a Name? OK, so maybe FIASP is not the most creative branding (sounds like a variety of wasps?), but the name certainly fits. Whether it will carry a new brand name here States when launched remains TBD. By Vial or Pen? Internationally, FIASP is available by vial, Penfill, and FlexTouch insulin pen. Interestingly, we see that in Europe it's approved for insulin pumps but it's not pump-approved in Canada. Hmm. Here in the U.S., Novo tells us FIASP will only be available in pen form. Timing Flexibility: FIASP can be taken anywhere from 2 minutes before a meal or up to 20 minutes after the start of a meal, and apparently works just as well as NovoRapid/NovoLog that is taken before mealtime. While Novo officially still recommends taking FIASP before the meal, overall they're touting more flexible dosing, mentioning “earlier, greater and faster absorption, th Continue reading >>

What Is Novolog

What Is Novolog

®? NovoLog® helps improve blood sugar control in people with diabetes. It is used to help lower blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes (aged 2 years and older) and adults with type 2 diabetes. But you may hear your health care provider refer to it by a few other names: As an insulin that you take at mealtime, NovoLog® is usually called “mealtime” or "bolus" insulin Because it goes to work quickly, it is also sometimes called “rapid-acting” or “fast-acting” insulin It is also called "analog insulin" because it is a man-made insulin that is a slightly changed version of the insulin your body makes naturally All of these things are true. What is NovoLog®? NovoLog® is a fast-acting mealtime insulin that helps lower mealtime blood sugar spikes. It has been proven to help control high blood sugar in people with diabetes when taken with a long-acting insulin. And, it has been used by millions of people since 2001. NovoLog® is fast-acting and works to help control blood sugar spikes when you eat. You should take NovoLog® and eat within 5 to 10 minutes. So you don’t have to wait 30 minutes before you eat, like you would with regular human insulin. Controlling your blood sugar at mealtime with NovoLog® can help lower your A1C when taken with a long-acting insulin. And, NovoLog® has a low rate of low blood sugar (also known as hypoglycemia). Keep in mind that low blood sugar is a common side effect of all insulins, including NovoLog®. NovoLog® is a fast-acting analog insulin, but it is not the only analog insulin. Different types of analog insulin are available. Each type of insulin helps keep diabetes under control. But no one type is right for everyone. Each person's insulin needs are different. And each person's insulin needs may change Continue reading >>

Fast Acting Insulin Treatment That Helps Lower Blood Sugar Levels Could Be On The Way For People With Diabetes In Europe

Fast Acting Insulin Treatment That Helps Lower Blood Sugar Levels Could Be On The Way For People With Diabetes In Europe

A new treatment for people with type 1 diabetes that helps lower blood sugar levels quickly could be available soon in Europe. Tests have shown the fast acting insulin treatment can speed up the initial insulin absorption rate for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes and helps create an earlier blood-glucose lowering effect, compared to existing treatments. The Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) under the European Medicines Agency (EMA) recently supported the new rapid-acting insulin treatment - Fiasp (faster-acting insulin aspart). In adults with type 1 diabetes, the faster-acting insulin aspart significantly reduced HbA1c levels when compared to the existing insulin aspart treatment when taken at meal times. The positive test results mean the treatment could soon be approved for use in Europe for adults with type1 diabetes. Dr Mark Evans, Consultant Physician at Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, and Lecturer at Cambridge University, Institute of Metabolic Science said: “The announcement is an important milestone in bringing people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes across Europe one step closer to being able to use this faster-acting insulin formulation, which may allow them to improve PPG (postprandial glucose - the increase in blood glucose levels after eating) excursions compared with current mealtime insulin. Importantly, better PPG control might then allow people living with diabetes to achieve challenging HbA1c targets.” Professor David Russell-Jones, Consultant Physician at the Royal Surrey County Hospital, and Professor of Diabetes and Endocrinology at the University of Surrey said: “Managing PPG levels can be challenging for those living with diabetes, resulting in hyperglycaemic (high blood sugar levels) episodes if glucose levels rise Continue reading >>

About Fast-acting Mealtime Insulin

About Fast-acting Mealtime Insulin

What is mealtime insulin? Mealtime insulins are fast-acting insulins that are taken immediately before or after meals. As you eat, your blood sugar naturally goes up, or “spikes.” Humalog® (a fast-acting insulin) works to manage those blood sugar spikes and may help keep your sugar levels in balance. Humalog should be taken within 15 minutes before eating or right after eating a meal. People who take Humalog will usually continue to take longer-acting insulin to help manage blood sugar levels at night and between meals. Taking mealtime insulin in addition to longer-acting insulin may help to control blood sugar levels throughout the day. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common side effect of Humalog that may be severe and cause unconsciousness (passing out), seizures, and death. Test your blood sugar levels as your doctor instructs. Talk to your doctor about low blood sugar symptoms and treatment. The orange area shows how blood sugar levels typically rise after meals. The pattern of insulin action may vary in different individuals or within the same individual. Comparing types of insulin Take a look at our overview below to find out about the different types of insulin. You’ll notice that there are differences in when the types of insulin reach your bloodstream, when they “peak” in your body, and how long they can last (length of time the insulin keeps lowering your blood sugar). Fast-acting insulin (also called rapid-acting) is absorbed quickly and starts working in about 15 minutes to lower blood sugar after meals. Humalog fast-acting insulin should be taken 15 minutes before eating or right after eating a meal. Depending on the type of diabetes you have, you may need to take Humalog with a longer-acting insulin or oral anti-diabetes medication. Continue reading >>

Fda Delays Us Approval Of Novo Nordisk’s Faster-acting Insulin Aspart, Issuing A Crl

Fda Delays Us Approval Of Novo Nordisk’s Faster-acting Insulin Aspart, Issuing A Crl

Danish diabetes care giant Novo Nordisk revealed on Friday that it has received a Complete Response Letter… To continue reading this article and to access exclusive features, interviews, round-ups and commentary from the sharpest minds in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology space you need to be logged into the site and have an active subscription or trial subscription. Please login or subscribe in order to continue reading. Claim a week's trial subscription by signing up for free today and receive our daily pharma and biotech news bulletin free of charge, forever. Continue reading >>

Faster Acting Insulin Could Be On The Horizion

Faster Acting Insulin Could Be On The Horizion

When I first saw the article my first thought was faster lows…it kind of scared me. But after reading it, there seems to be some great promise in an insulin you can take before or even after you have eaten and it covers the meal quickly but also ends quicker, reducing the risk of a hypo event after taking it. Other countries have already approved it and it is looking like the concerns the FDA had are being addressed. Should be interesting to see. Here is the full article: Good morning. I am new here and looking for sound advice. My husband has type two diebetes and we can't seem to get his blood sugar down and we don't want more medication....We want to be medication free. I am following the Ketos diet because I need to lose weight but hubby is very thin and... I am my husband's caregiver and he has Type 2 Diabetes. I found this group and have already got a lot of questions answered so thanks! We have been hearing so much about Metformin and after him losing 50+ lbs. are wondering if he even needs to be on it to start with. His numbers have only been... Hello everyone, I was diagnosed with diabetes today. My A1C is at 10. I’m so lost and confused. I spent the entire day crying. I did this to myself by eating unhealthy and drinking lots of sodas. I’m only 32 years old and I feel like my life is over already. Any advice or kind words is greatly... I had to have a perma cath inserted yesterday. I'm doing ok, but, very sore all over. Had my first dialysis today and it went alright. Had a bit of nausea and a mild leg cramp but it wasn't too bad. We are having another winter storm and it's looking more and more like I will miss tomorrows... Hi everyone, I was clearing out some favorites shortcuts and stopped on this site. It's been a while and I hope all are doing well. Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

Humalog Side Effects

Humalog Side Effects

Generic Name: insulin lispro (IN soo lin LISS pro) Brand Names: HumaLOG, HumaLOG Cartridge, HumaLOG KwikPen, HumaLOG KwikPen (Concentrated) What is Humalog? Humalog (insulin lispro) is a fast-acting insulin that starts to work about 15 minutes after injection, peaks in about 1 hour, and keeps working for 2 to 4 hours. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Humalog is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Humalog is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. Humalog is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 3 years old. Important information Humalog is a fast-acting insulin that begins to work very quickly. If you use this medication with meal, use it within 15 minutes before or just after you eat. Never share an injection pen, cartridge, or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. You should not use Humalog if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humalog is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels. Before taking this medicine You should not use Humalog if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humalog should not be given to a child younger than 3 years old. Humalog should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure Humalog is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if Continue reading >>

Humalog 75-25

Humalog 75-25

HUMALOG® Mix75/25™ (75% insulin lispro protamine) Suspension and (25% insulin lispro) Injection, (rDNA origin) 100 Units per ML (U-100) DESCRIPTION Humalog® Mix75/25™ [75% insulin lispro protamine suspension and 25% insulin lispro injection, (rDNA origin)] is a mixture of insulin lispro solution, a rapid-acting blood glucose-lowering agent and insulin lispro protamine suspension, an intermediate-acting blood glucose-lowering agent. Chemically, insulin lispro is Lys(B28), Pro(B29) human insulin analog, created when the amino acids at positions 28 and 29 on the insulin B-chain are reversed. Insulin lispro is synthesized in a special non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli bacteria that has been genetically altered to produce insulin lispro. Insulin lispro protamine suspension (NPL component) is a suspension of crystals produced from combining insulin lispro and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation. Insulin lispro has the following primary structure: Insulin lispro has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 and a molecular weight of 5808, both identical to that of human insulin. Humalog Mix75/25 vials and Pens contain a sterile suspension of insulin lispro protamine suspension mixed with soluble insulin lispro for use as an injection. Each milliliter of Humalog Mix75/25 injection contains insulin lispro 100 units, 0.28 mg protamine sulfate, 16 mg glycerin, 3.78 mg dibasic sodium phosphate, 1.76 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.025 mg zinc ion, 0.715 mg phenol, and Water for Injection. Humalog Mix75/25 has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. Hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10% may have been added to adjust pH. Continue reading >>

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