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Explain How Lifestyle Choices Can Impact A Person’s Risk For Developing Diabetes.

Type 2 Diabetes Causes

Type 2 Diabetes Causes

Type 2 diabetes has several causes: genetics and lifestyle are the most important ones. A combination of these factors can cause insulin resistance, when your body doesn’t use insulin as well as it should. Insulin resistance is the most common cause of type 2 diabetes. Genetics Play a Role in Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes can be hereditary. That doesn’t mean that if your mother or father has (or had) type 2 diabetes, you’re guaranteed to develop it; instead, it means that you have a greater chance of developing type 2. Researchers know that you can inherit a risk for type 2 diabetes, but it’s difficult to pinpoint which genes carry the risk. The medical community is hard at work trying to figure out the certain genetic mutations that lead to a risk of type 2. Lifestyle Is Very Important, Too Genes do play a role in type 2 diabetes, but lifestyle choices are also important. You can, for example, have a genetic mutation that may make you susceptible to type 2, but if you take good care of your body, you may not develop diabetes. Say that two people have the same genetic mutation. One of them eats well, watches their cholesterol, and stays physically fit, and the other is overweight (BMI greater than 25) and inactive. The person who is overweight and inactive is much more likely to develop type 2 diabetes because certain lifestyle choices greatly influence how well your body uses insulin. Lack of exercise: Physical activity has many benefits—one of them being that it can help you avoid type 2 diabetes, if you’re susceptible. Unhealthy meal planning choices: A meal plan filled with high-fat foods and lacking in fiber (which you can get from grains, vegetables, and fruits) increases the likelihood of type 2. Overweight/Obesity: Lack of exercise and unhealthy me Continue reading >>

'how Diabetes Affects My Daily Life'

'how Diabetes Affects My Daily Life'

Brian Hunte was born in Trinidad and now lives in London. He was diagnosed with diabetes around 34 years ago, when he was 43. He talks about living with the condition. "When I was diagnosed with diabetes, it was a surprise. I didn't feel unwell, but I had been losing weight and felt thirsty all the time. "I was drinking lots of water and going to the loo more often. I had to get up twice in the night to urinate, which wasn't normal for me." Seeing the doctor "When I described my symptoms to the GP, he said it sounded like diabetes symptoms. Blood tests confirmed I had type 1, which usually develops earlier than 43, but can develop in older people. "I was worried because I didn't know anything about diabetes. I didn't like the idea of giving myself injections. "At first, I was given tablets to stimulate the pancreas to produce insulin. I also had to change my diet. "I needed to avoid sugar, so I gave up cakes, chocolates, sweets, and sugar in my tea and coffee. It wasn't as difficult as I'd expected, but I confess I still eat cakes every now and then." Fried and sugary food "The doctors also recommended a healthy diet with no fatty foods, so no chips or anything else fried. I loved sausages, eggs, bacon and black pudding, but it wasn't too hard to give them up. "I ate more fibre and fruit (but fruit is sugary, so I don't have more than three portions a day), steamed or boiled vegetables and grilled meat. It was a normal diet, really. I could go to a restaurant with friends and order from the menu easily. "I never ate too much Trinidadian food because my wife is Irish. Growing up with three sisters in Trinidad meant I was never allowed in the kitchen. It was only when I emigrated to Dublin in 1959 that I learned to cook for myself. "I taught my wife some Trinidadian dishe Continue reading >>

Influence Of Lifestyle On The Course Of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Influence Of Lifestyle On The Course Of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Clinical course of type 1 diabetes Since the first therapeutic use of insulin the clinical course of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) has changed dramatically from a disease with very short life expectancy to a chronic condition, the course of which is influenced largely by the development of chronic complications. The clinical onset of T1DM is preceded by a preclinical phase of variable duration, characterized by progressive autoimmune destruction of beta cells and presence of specific autoantibodies. In genetically susceptible individuals, this autoimmune reaction seems to be initiated and modulated by exposure to various environmental triggers and regulators, which might include viral infections or introducing cow's milk or cereals into the diet [1]. According to the accelerator hypothesis [2], an increased rate of β-cell apoptosis and insulin resistance modulate the timing of clinical onset and subsequent course of autoimmune diabetes. However, the autoimmune process is thought to be the main accelerator of β-cell destruction both before and after onset of T1DM [3]. Clinical manifestation of T1DM varies considerably in severity with greater insulin deficiency and greater risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children and adolescents than in adults [4]. After introduction of insulin treatment, many patients enter clinical remission of the disease with partially restored endogenous insulin secretion and near-normoglycemia on very low doses of exogenous insulin. In many patients with phenotypic T1DM residual insulin secretion can be maintained for over 30 years, and is associated with better metabolic control, including decreased incidence of both hyper- and hypoglycemia, and decreased risk of chronic complications when compared with patients without detectable insulin Continue reading >>

Pltw: Biomedical Science – Unit 2: Diabetes

Pltw: Biomedical Science – Unit 2: Diabetes

Glucose Tolerance Testing can be used to diagnose diabetes by giving a person a large amount of sugar when they have not eaten, and then examine how their body responds to the sugar by watching the glucose levels in the blood. If the glucose levels maintain a high level of glucose, then they most likely have diabetes. Insulin injections are not the course of treatment for all diabetics because people with type 2 diabetes cannot do anything with insulin already produced, thus they would not be able to put the extra insulin injections to use. However for people with type 1 diabetes, then they need the insulin because their body does not produce it. *(Type 2 Diabetes can be reversed.)* Write my sample Activity 2.1.1 – Explain how lifestyle choices can impact a person’s risk for developing diabetes. Lifestyle choices can impact a person’s risk for developing diabetes because if someone is overweight, has very little activity, and has bad eating habits (such as eating food with high fat content or sodium), then they will become more likely for developing diabetes. On the other hand, people can reduce their chances of developing diabetes by eating a healthy diet, have a “normal” weight, and exercising regularly. When a doctor say that a person is “pre-diabetic”, it means that the patient does not have diabetes, but they may be showing symptoms of becoming a diabetic. In the activity we did, the patient A’s glucose levels stayed high for a short period of time before dipping lowing, therefore, patient A could be labeled as pre-diabetic. This means that if patient A were to change their eating habits and increase their activity level, then they would be able to avoid becoming a diabetics. One benefit of using models to represent scientific processes is enlarging Continue reading >>

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Piggybacking the obesity epidemic, diabetes rates continue to surge. On June 10, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new and alarming statistics on diabetes. An estimated 29 million Americans have the disease, a nearly 12 percent increase from the 26 million diabetics in 2010. One-fourth of people don’t know they have diabetes—a scary fact, given the complications of chronically high blood sugar: heart attack, stroke, sight-robbing eye disease, kidney failure, foot amputation. Worse, another 86 million adults have prediabetes, a condition of elevated blood sugar just below the threshold for diabetes. The vast majority of cases are type 2 diabetes, a condition characterized by insulin resistance, meaning cells fail to respond to insulin. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin. The good news is type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. A seminal 2006 study demonstrated that intensive lifestyle modification reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent, as compared to a 31 percent risk reduction achieved with the antidiabetes drug metformin. 7 tips to help reduce your risk: Lose excess body fat. Being overweight is a big risk factor for diabetes. In contrast, every kilogram (2.2 pounds) of weight lost reduces diabetes risk by 16 percent. Follow a plant-based, low-calorie diet. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables—a dietary pattern studies show reduces diabetes risk. Foods to avoid are those rich in trans fats (also called hydrogenated fat), saturated fat, and sugar. Drink water. Studies link sugar-sweetened beverages with obesity and diabetes. Cut them out of your diet and the risk of both conditions falls. Move your body. Physical inactivity raises the risk of diabetes. Exercise renders cells more sensitive t Continue reading >>

Lesson 2.1 Study Help

Lesson 2.1 Study Help

Describe how Glucose Tolerance Testing can be used to diagnose diabetes. You give someone a large amount of sugar when they have not eaten for awhile and then examine how their body responds to the sugar by watching the glucose levels in the blood. If they stay high majority of the time, the person most likely has diabetes. Explain why insulin injections are not the course of treatment for all diabetics. Type 2 Diabetics cannot do anything with insulin already produced; they would not be able to use the extra insulin. Whereas Type 1 Diabetics need the insulin because their body does not produce it. Also, Type 2 Diabetes can be reversed. Explain how lifestyle choices can impact a person's risk for developing diabetes. -Increase risk:Overweight, older, bad diet(high fat, sodium, carb), woman's pregnancy, genetic factors -Decrease risk: exercise, healthy diet, healthy weight. What do you think it means if doctors say that a person is "pre-diabetic"? The person may be showing symptoms of a diabetic. In the activity Patient A's glucose levels stayed high for a short amount of time, then dropped(her glucose levels are unstable). Patient A would be an example of being "pre-diabetic". The doctor would say that Patient A would need to change their eating habits and increase their activity level. Using information from this activity, explain the basic relationship between insulin and glucose. As glucose levels increase, insulin levels increase(direct relationship). As insulin levels increase, blood glucose level decreases(inverse relationship). Describe one benefit and one drawback of using models to represent scientific processes. One Benefit: enlarging so you can see it visually, making something complex and hard to understand to simplify it one drawback: not entirely accurate Continue reading >>

3 Explain How Lifestyle Choices Can Impact A Persons Risk For Developing

3 Explain How Lifestyle Choices Can Impact A Persons Risk For Developing

that insulin and reacts diFerently than the average person. 3. Explain how lifestyle choices can impact a persons risk for developing diabetes.-DiFerent lifestyle choices, such as a sedentary lifestyle where one does not exercise enough or a poor diet of eating too many high fat, carb, and sodium diets can increase the risk of diabetes. In contrast, aperson who lives a more active lifestyle, such as exercising regularly, eating healthy, and maintaining a t weight can decrease their chances of diabetes due to not aFecting body processes that produce insulin and handle glucose. 4. What do you think it means if doctors say that a person is pre-diabetic?-If a doctor says that one might be pre-diabetic, I think it means that a person might be at risk of contracting diabetes in the near future if they continue with the lifestyle choices they make or because of their family history. 5. Using information from this activity, explain the basic relationship between insulin and glucose. -The relationship between insulin and glucose is that insulin is a hormone that helps the body absorb glucose to give the body energy whilst simultaneously regulating the levels of that sugar by making sure all the cells utilize it for energy. Too much can be a problem and so can too little. This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Factors

Diabetes Risk Factors

Diabetes is a condition that affects the body’s ability to use blood sugar for energy. The three types are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Doctors usually diagnose type 1 diabetes in childhood, although it can occur in adults also. Type 1 diabetes affects the body’s ability to produce insulin. This hormone is vital to helping the body utilize blood sugar. Without enough insulin, the extra blood sugar can damage the body. According to the American Diabetes Association, 5 percent of all people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a condition that affects a body’s ability to use insulin properly. Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 diabetes make some insulin. However, they can’t make enough to keep up with rising blood sugar levels. Doctors associate type 2 diabetes with lifestyle-related factors like obesity. Gestational diabetes is a condition that causes women to have very high blood sugar levels during pregnancy. This condition is typically temporary. Having risk factors does not mean that someone will get diabetes. Doctors don’t know the exact cause of type 1 diabetes. Family history of type 1 diabetes is considered a risk factor. According to the American Diabetes Association, the child of a man with type 1 diabetes has a 1 in 17 chance of developing type 1 diabetes. If a woman has type 1 diabetes, her child has a 1 in 25 chance if the child was born when the woman was younger than 25. Women with type 1 diabetes who give birth at age 25 or older have a 1 in 100 chance of having a child with type 1 diabetes. Having a parent with type 2 diabetes also increases diabetes risk. Because diabetes is often related to lifestyle choices, parents may pass on poor health habits to their children. This increases their risk Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes management requires awareness. Know what makes your blood sugar level rise and fall — And how to control these day-to-day factors. Keeping your blood sugar levels within the range recommended by your doctor can be challenging. That's because many things make your blood sugar levels change, sometimes unexpectedly. Following are some factors that can affect your blood sugar levels. Food Healthy eating is a cornerstone of healthy living — with or without diabetes. But if you have diabetes, you need to know how foods affect your blood sugar levels. It's not only the type of food you eat but also how much you eat and the combinations of food types you eat. What to do: Learn about carbohydrate counting and portion sizes. A key to many diabetes management plans is learning how to count carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the foods that often have the biggest impact on your blood sugar levels. And for people taking mealtime insulin, it's crucial to know the amount of carbohydrates in your food, so you get the proper insulin dose. Learn what portion size is appropriate for each type of food. Simplify your meal planning by writing down portions for the foods you eat often. Use measuring cups or a scale to ensure proper portion size and an accurate carbohydrate count. Make every meal well-balanced. As much as possible, plan for every meal to have a good mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins and fats. It's especially important to pay attention to the types of carbohydrates you choose. Some carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, are better for you than are others. These foods are low in carbohydrates and contain fiber that helps keep your blood sugar levels more stable. Talk to your doctor, nurse or dietitian about the best food choices and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

Type 2 diabetes is more common in people who don't do enough physical activity, and who are overweight or obese. Type 2 diabetes can often be prevented or delayed with early lifestyle changes, however there is no cure. Common symptoms include being more thirsty than usual, passing more urine, feeling tired and lethargic, slow-healing wounds, itching and skin infections and blurred vision. People with pre-diabetes can reduce their risk of developing diabetes by increasing their physical activity, eating healthily and losing weight (if they are overweight). On this page: Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood. The body uses glucose as its main source of energy. Glucose comes from foods that contain carbohydrates, such as potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, fruit and milk. After food is digested, the glucose is released and absorbed into the bloodstream. The glucose in the bloodstream needs to move into body tissues so that cells can use it for energy. Excess glucose is stored in the liver, or converted to fat and stored in other body tissues. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, which is a gland located just below the stomach. Insulin opens the doors (the glucose channels) that let glucose move from the blood into the body cells. It also allows glucose to be stored in the liver and other tissues. This is part of a process known as glucose metabolism. There are two main types of diabetes – type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition where the body's immune cells attack the insulin-producing cells. As a result, people with type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin and need insulin injections to survive. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and affects 85 to 90 per cent of all people with diabet Continue reading >>

The Prevention And Control The Type-2 Diabetes By Changing Lifestyle And Dietary Pattern

The Prevention And Control The Type-2 Diabetes By Changing Lifestyle And Dietary Pattern

Go to: INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus or type-2 diabetes, is one of the major non-communicable and fastest growing public health problems in the world, is a condition difficult to treat and expensive to manage. It has been estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from the current value of about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years.[1,2,3] Individuals with type-2 diabetes are at a high risk of developing a range of debilitating complications such as cardiovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, nephropathy, changes to the retina and blindness that can lead to disability and premature death. It also imposes important medical and economic burdens. Genetic susceptibility and environmental influences seem to be the most important factors responsible for the development of this condition. However, a drastic increase of physical inactivity, obesity, and type-2 diabetes has been recently observed. The fact indicates that obesity and physical inactivity may constitute the main reasons for the increasing burden of diabetes in the developed world.[4,5,6,7,8,9,10] Fortunately, because environmental factors are modifiable, disease manifestation from these factors is largely preventable. Diet is one of the major factors now linked to a wide range of diseases including diabetes. The amount and type of food consumed is a fundamental determinant of human health. Diet constitutes a crucial aspect of the overall management of diabetes, which may involve diet alone, diet with oral hypoglycemic drugs, or diet with insulin.[11,12,13,14,15] Diet is individualized depending on age, weight, gender, health condition, and occupation etc. The dietary guidelines as used in this review are sets of advisory statements that give quick dietary advic Continue reading >>

How Lifestyle Can Affect Your Risk Of Diabetes

How Lifestyle Can Affect Your Risk Of Diabetes

By Rhonda Meyer, FNP, FamilyHealth Medical Clinic in Lakeville Diabetes is a growing problem in America. An estimated 25.8 million people – more than 8% of the population – have diabetes.* Knowing the risk factors for type 2 diabetes, a condition in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone needed to convert food into energy necessary for daily life, may help individuals delay or prevent the disease. In fact, many lifestyle choices can reduce one's chance of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a recent study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.** The study showed that each of the following behaviors was associated with a 31% lower risk for diabetes in men and 39% lower risk for women. •Not smoking •Engaging in regular physical activity •Consuming a healthy diet •Using alcohol in moderation •Having optimal body weight Of these lifestyle factors, obesity had the strongest association with diabetes. In addition, smoking hampers the body's ability to utilize insulin and affects the cells of the pancreas that produce insulin. Subscribe Family history also has a strong bearing on a person's chance of developing diabetes, but the study showed that these lifestyle behaviors affected one's risk of diabetes regardless of his or her family history of the disease. Consider the following tips to help control your risk for diabetes: 1.Exercise and eat right. 2.Lose weight. Reducing your weight by 5% to 10%, in combination with eating right and exercising, may help you impede or avoid diabetes altogether. 3.Control blood pressure. Experts recommend taking whatever steps are necessary to reach a blood pressure reading of 130/80 or below. Diabetes is alsoa a leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease. 4.Quit smoking. Kicking the h Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Changes For Type 2 Diabetes

Lifestyle Changes For Type 2 Diabetes

Physical activity and diet changes and often advised to those at high risk Lifestyle changes are often advised for people at higher risk of diabetes and those who are newly diagnosed with type 2, to help manage their diabetes. The recommended lifestyle interventions include: Taking two and a half hours each week of moderate intensity physical activity or one hour and 15 minutes of high intensity exercise. Losing weight gradually to achieve a healthy body mass index Replacing refined carbohydrates with wholegrain foods and increase intake of vegetables and other foods high in dietary fibre Reducing the amount of saturated fat in the diet NICE recommend taking either 2 hours of moderate intensity physical activity or 1 hours of intense exercise. Moderate intensity physical activity includes: Cycling either rapidly or over steep terrain Some people may be able to be referred for structured or supervised exercise sessions . Guideline issued by NICE recommend those that are overweight aim to lose weight gradually until a healthy BMI is achieved. Or between 18.5 and 22.9 for people of South Asian descent For those with a BMI above the healthy range, NICE recommends aiming to achieve weight loss gradually, with a target to reduce weight by 5 to 10% over a period of a year. Weight loss can help to reduce the risk of developing diabetes and can enable people with existing pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes to better control blood glucose levels. If you have a BMI of over 30, your GP may refer you to take part in a structured weight loss programme. People unable to achieve weight loss via lifestyle changes may be prescribed a weight loss pill called orlistat. The general dietary advice from NICE to reduce risk of type 2 diabetes is to decrease intakes of fat and increase intake of Continue reading >>

These Five Habits Can Save Your Heart — Heres How

These Five Habits Can Save Your Heart — Heres How

According to hard data, five harmful habits herald the coming of heart disease. These five are smoking, being inactive, carrying too many pounds, eating poorly, and drinking too much alcohol. Alone and together, they set the stage for artery-damaging atherosclerosis and spur it onward. They do this by deranging metabolism and changing how cells and tissues work. They also disturb the markers of health we worry about so much: blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar. All too often, the end result of these five habits is a heart attack, stroke, peripheral artery disease, valve problem, aortic aneurysm, or heart failure. And the damage they cause isn't limited to the cardiovascular system, but extends to the kidneys, bones, and brain. What can making better choices do for health and longevity? Consider this provocative finding from the Nurses' Health Study. Nonsmoking women with a healthy weight who exercised regularly, consumed a healthy diet, and had an alcoholic drink every other day were 83% less likely to have had a heart attack or to have died of heart disease over a 14-year period, compared with all the other women in the study. The results were almost identical in a similar study in men. In these two studies, more than two-thirds of all cardiovascular events could be chalked up to smoking, excess weight, poor diet, and drinking too much. Five strategies for change Count on these five white knights to protect your heart, your arteries, and the rest of you. They will make you look better and feel better. And it's never too late to start. Avoid tobacco. Smoke from cigarettes, cigars, and pipes is as bad for the heart and arteries as it is for the lungs. If you smoke, quitting is the biggest gift of health you can give yourself. Secondhand smoke is also toxic, so a Continue reading >>

2.1.1 What Is Diabetes?

2.1.1 What Is Diabetes?

2.1.1 What is Diabetes? A glucose tolerance test is a lab test to check how the person/patients body breaks down sugar. For this test the patient has to drink a liquid containing a certain amount of glucose. Then their blood will be taken again every 0, 30,60,90, and 120 minutes after they drink the solution. The purpose of the Insulin test is to monitor the amount of insulin produced by the person. The test determines if the person is producing a specific amount of insulin or not. For example, Anna didn't produce any insulin so, her insulin levels were at 0 the whole 2 hours. We are testing Patient A, Patient B, and Anna Garcia for diabetes. We are testing their insulin and glucose levels. For Patient A she was overweight and her symptoms included excessive thirst and occasional unexplained mood swings. Though she exercise 1-2 times a week because of her job and eats a lot of reheated food that is loaded in sodium. However, she claims to eat a good amount of fruits and vegetables each day and her routine urinalysis was normal. Patient B's symptoms included an increase in thirst and urination but he says he feels fine. Though , he takes medication for both elevated blood pressure and high cholesterol, he doesn't participate in any formalized exercise, and he eats a lot of heavy foods. Plus, they found ketones in his urine. Patient A and Patient B have the risk factors of being overweight and Patient B has the risk factor of diabetes in his genetics because his uncle and grandmother both had diabetes. Data Tables: Conclusion Questions: 1.) Describe how Glucose Tolerance testing can be used to diagnose diabetes. Glucose Tolerance testing can be used to diagnose diabetes by determining how much glucose is in your blood. This is used because when you have any type of diabet Continue reading >>

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