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Does Type 2 Diabetes Require Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Tweet Injecting insulin is an essential part of the daily regime for many diabetics. Although insulin that can be inhaled is now available and approved, the reality is that most type 1 diabetics (and type 2 diabetics who require insulin) will have to continue injecting insulin until it is more common. Does injecting insulin hurt? Needle technology for insulin injection has become much better in recent years, meaning that the injection process, although not pain-free, does not hurt as much as it used to. Many patients still find injecting insulin to manage their diabetes an unpleasant process, however. Is injecting insulin and having diabetes going to change my life? Unfortunately, having diabetes does lead to lifestyle complications. For insulin therapy to be effective, it is necessary to make certain lifestyle changes. These should include: eating healthily exercising regularly testing blood glucose regularly and following a strict insulin regimen Although adhering to all these changes does influence your daily routine, the benefits for diabetics are enormous. Into what part of my body should I inject insulin to best help my diabetes? The abdomen is the most common site for injecting insulin. For some people, this site is not suitable, and other sites must be used. These include the upper arms, the upper buttocks and the outside of the thigh. All of these sites are most effective because they have a layer of fat to absorb the insulin better. This process directly injects insulin into the subcutaneous tissue. These areas also have fewer nerve endings, meaning that they are the least painful areas in which to inject. Should I switch the site where I inject insulin? Your healthcare team should be able to help you to decided the best places to inject insulin, when you shou Continue reading >>

“do I Need Insulin For My Type 2 Diabetes?”

“do I Need Insulin For My Type 2 Diabetes?”

After a type 2 diabetes diagnosis, there are four treatment options that you can discuss with your doctor: Diet & Exercise: Learning how to reduce the carbohydrates and overall calories in your diet along with regular exercise for weight loss. Losing weight helps improve insulin sensitivity (gaining weight promotes insulin resistance). For some people with type 2 diabetes, these changes can be enough to achieve healthier blood sugar levels. Oral Medications: There are a variety of oral medications (pills) for improving blood sugars in people with type 2 diabetes. They each are classified by their make-up and the impact on the body. While some pills increase natural insulin production, other pills are designed to decrease the amount of glycogen (which is eventually converted to glucose) secreted by your liver. The 6 primary classifications of pills are, Sulfonylureas, Meglitinides, Biguanides, Thiazolidinediones, Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, and DPP-4 inhibitors. You may know some of the brand names, like Metformin, Avandia, or Januvia. Your diabetes healthcare team will help you determine the best fit for you. Injectable Medications: Known well as “Byetta” or “Symlin,” these medications are injected, but are very different than insulin. Symlin is known for helping with reducing blood sugars but also for promoting weight loss. Byetta works by increasing your own natural insulin production. Insulin: Lastly, there is insulin, which is administered with a syringe, pen, or pump. While most doctors will take you through the options above before prescribing insulin, this option might be exactly what you need. Insulin is the most powerful hormone in the body for regulating blood sugars, and as a person with type 2 diabetes, you either don’t produce enough to meet you Continue reading >>

Insulin For Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin For Type 2 Diabetes

Considering insulin? What you should know. By the dLife Editors Many people with type 2 diabetes will eventually require insulin to keep their diabetes in control. In fact, most experts believe we wait too long in the progression of type 2 diabetes before starting people on insulin. Progressing to insulin does not mean you are failing, but just that your body needs a little more help to keep your blood sugar in range. How much insulin you need, and when you take it, depends on several factors: the type of insulin your doctor has prescribed, your nutrition and exercise habits, and other co-existing medical conditions, and medications you may be taking. Types of Insulin Insulin can be divided into three main categories. The first is long-acting, also known as basal or background insulin. It is usually given once (or sometimes twice) daily, and is intended to help control blood sugar over a twenty-four-hour period. The second category is shorter-acting insulins. These are used to help control blood sugar spikes after eating, and also to “correct” an unusually high blood sugar reading. Depending on the type, they start to work within fifteen to thirty minutes, and last for three to six hours. Many people with type 2 diabetes do well with just a long-acting insulin combined with oral medicines, while others will need to add a mealtime dose of shorter-acting insulin to control after-meal blood sugar spikes. The third category is made up of combinations of long- and shorter-acting insulin. These insulin mixtures are usually given twice daily. The long-acting insulins now approved for use in the United States are Lantus, Levemir, Toujeo, Tresiba, and Basaglar. Novolin N and Humulin N are older forms of insulin that are not as long-acting as the newer ones, and their activit Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

If your child or someone you know has been recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you may be wondering how the disease differs from type 2 diabetes — the form people tend to know more about. What causes type 1 versus type 2 diabetes? Are the symptoms the same? And how is each treated? Here to clear up the confusion with an overview of key differences — and similarities — between these two types of diabetes are experts Julie Settles, M.S.N., A.C.N.P.-B.C., C.E.N., a clinical research scientist at Lilly Diabetes, and Rosemary Briars, N.D., P.N.P.-B.C., C.D.E., C.C.D.C., clinical director and program co-director of the Chicago Children’s Diabetes Center at La Rabida Children’s Hospital. Causes Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, as it’s formally known in medical terms, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which a person develops high blood glucose (blood sugar). The underlying health factors causing the high blood sugar will determine whether someone is diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which “the body’s immune system starts to make antibodies that are targeted directly at the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (islet cells),” explains Briars. Over time, the immune system “gradually destroys the islet cells, so insulin is no longer made and the person has to take insulin every day, from then on,” she says. As for why this happens, Settles notes, “The immune system normally fights off viruses and bacteria that we do not want in our body, but when it causes diabetes, it is because something has gone wrong and now the body attacks its own cells.” Triggering this autoimmune response is a complex mix of genetic and environmental factors that researchers are still trying to fully understand. O Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

It is widely believed that those with Type 2 diabetes may eventually need insulin if they have diabetes for long enough. However, only about 20-30 percent of people with Type 2 diabetes end up needing insulin injections. In this article, we will explore whether it is possible to manage your diabetes without insulin. If so, how can one do so and when they may eventually need insulin if other treatments do not work out? 1 Type 1 Diabetes disclaimer This article is not for people with Type 1 diabetes because it is imperative that people with Type 1 diabetes require insulin every day without question. A person with Type 1 diabetes produces very little, or no insulin. Without insulin, you cannot convert food into usable energy. Simply put, without insulin, a person with Type 1 diabetes cannot survive. 2 When Robert contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, he was concerned that one day he would have to take insulin shots for his Type 2 diabetes. He had heard a few of his friends with diabetes at church talking about how they had to take insulin injections. Robert was “afraid of needles,” and the thought of giving himself a shot scared him. Is Robert going to need to start taking insulin, or is there any way he can avoid it at this point? If he avoids it, what effects would this have on his health? Will he develop long term complications of diabetes if he doesn’t start giving himself shots of insulin? I suggest also reading these: At TheDiabetesCouncil, we decided to take a look at this particular question in depth, for Robert and for others with diabetes who might benefit from reading this information. Insulin isn’t the “bad guy.” Naturally, the fear of giving oneself an injection or “shot,” can increase anxiety and stress. But what if I told you that once you get past t Continue reading >>

Insulin: Who Needs It And Who Doesn't?

Insulin: Who Needs It And Who Doesn't?

Does getting a diagnosis of diabetes automatically mean you will need to start taking insulin? The answer depends on the type of diabetes and how much your condition has progressed. People with type 1 diabetes require supplemental insulin because their bodies can no longer produce insulin themselves. However, type 2 diabetes is different. Less than one-third of those with type 2 diabetes take insulin. The CDC puts the number at about 28 percent. Some experts have long believed that more patients with type 2 diabetes should be on insulin in order to reach their blood glucose and lipid (cholesterol) targets. When you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes you will probably wonder if, or when, you will need insulin. You may fear injections or you may believe that needing insulin represents a personal failure. So, you resist taking the drug, even when you need it. Whether or not a person with type 2 diabetes needs insulin is based on individual circumstances. The first step? Knowing the facts. Does Everyone With Diabetes Need Insulin? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are conditions in which you don't have enough insulin or don't react to it well enough to remove glucose from the blood. This creates two problems: High blood glucose levels A lack of stored glucose, the body’s major fuel source The difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes lies in the cause of this condition. Beta cells, found in the pancreas, produce the body’s insulin. In type 1 diabetes, most of those beta cells have been destroyed, limiting the supply of insulin. As a result, individuals with type 1 diabetes must take insulin to control their blood glucose levels. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas may still produce insulin, but it either produces insufficient amounts or the body resists the insulin itself. Di Continue reading >>

What Type Of Diabetes Requires Insulin Injections?

What Type Of Diabetes Requires Insulin Injections?

People with Type 1 diabetes always require insulin injections in order to control blood sugar readings because they make little or no insulin. Insulin is also prescribed for Type 2 diabetes when oral medications or other injectable meds are not controlling blood sugar levels adequately. Anyone taking insulin of any kind is at risk for hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Taking insulin does not mean you have a “bad type” of diabetes. The purpose of using insulin is to get the best management of blood sugar readings as close to normal blood sugar readings as possible to help avoid complications from diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results in destruction of the insulin producing cells. People with this type of diabetes must take insulin. Type 2 diabetes is a multimolecular disorder that causes 2 things (at least). First insulin secretion is inadequate. It may be the amount or the way it is secreted. Second most people with this type of diabetes also have a resistance to the insulin they do put out. So it's a double whammy. There are three factors that come into play that might determine the need for insulin: physical activity, dietary intake and age. A lot of exercise, a proper diet to control weight may minimize the amount of medication you need for many years but this is a progressive disorder and as you get older so does your ability to produce insulin. Sooner or later, even under the best of circumstances you will need insulin. Now, it may be of advantage to start insulin way before that time to keep your blood glucose normal which leads to a better quality of life and reduce risk for complications. Actually, all types of diabetes (type 1, type 2 and gestational) can require insulin injections. With type 1 diabetes, a person's beta cells stop pr Continue reading >>

12 Myths About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

12 Myths About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin facts vs. fiction When you hear the word “insulin,” do you picture giant needles (ouch!) or pop culture portrayals of insulin users with low blood sugar (like Julia Roberts losing it in Steel Magnolias)? Either way, most people think of insulin as a difficult, painful, or potentially scary medical treatment. The problem is that if you have type 2 diabetes, you need to know the real deal before you can make an informed choice about whether or not this potentially lifesaving therapy is right for you. Here, we take a look at the facts and fiction about insulin when it comes to treating type 2 diabetes. Diabetics always need insulin Not necessarily. People with type 1 diabetes (about 5% to 10% of diabetics) do need insulin. If you have type 2, which includes 90% to 95% of all people with diabetes, you may not need insulin. Of adults with diabetes, only 14% use insulin, 13% use insulin and oral medication, 57% take oral medication only, and 16% control blood sugar with diet and exercise alone, according to the CDC. The point is to get blood sugar—which can be a highly toxic poison in the body—into the safe zone by any means necessary. Taking insulin means you’ve ‘failed’ “This is a big myth,” says Jill Crandall, MD, professor of clinical medicine and director of the diabetes clinical trial unit at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in the Bronx, N.Y. “Many people who try very hard to adhere to a diet, exercise, and lose weight will still need insulin.” The fact is that type 2 diabetes is a progressive illness, meaning that over time you may need to change what you do to make sure your blood sugar is in a healthy range. Eating right and exercise will always be important, but medication needs can vary. “A large percentage of people with ty Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

Treatment for diabetes aims to keep your blood glucose levels as normal as possible and control your symptoms to prevent health problems developing later in life. If you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your GP will be able to explain your condition in detail and help you understand your treatment. They'll also closely monitor your condition to identify any health problems that may occur. If there are any problems, you may be referred to a hospital-based diabetes care team. Making lifestyle changes If you're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you'll need to look after your health very carefully for the rest of your life. This may seem daunting, but your diabetes care team will be able to give you support and advice about all aspects of your treatment. After being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, or if you're at risk of developing the condition, the first step is to look at your diet and lifestyle and make any necessary changes. Three major areas that you'll need to look closely at are: You may be able to keep your blood glucose at a safe and healthy level without the need for other types of treatment. Lifestyle changes Diet Increasing the amount of fibre in your diet and reducing your sugar and fat intake, particularly saturated fat, can help prevent type 2 diabetes, as well as manage the condition if you already have it. You should: increase your consumption of high-fibre foods, such as wholegrain bread and cereals, beans and lentils, and fruit and vegetables choose foods that are low in fat – replace butter, ghee and coconut oil with low-fat spreads and vegetable oil choose skimmed and semi-skimmed milk, and low-fat yoghurts eat fish and lean meat rather than fatty or processed meat, such as sausages and burgers grill, bake, poach or steam food instead of frying Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Insulin Treatment (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Insulin Treatment (beyond The Basics)

TYPE 2 DIABETES OVERVIEW Type 2 diabetes mellitus occurs when the pancreas (an organ in the abdomen) produces insufficient amounts of the hormone insulin and/or the body's tissues become resistant to normal or even high levels of insulin. This causes high blood glucose (sugar) levels, which can lead to a number of complications if untreated. People with type 2 diabetes require regular monitoring and ongoing treatment to maintain normal or near-normal blood sugar levels. Treatment includes lifestyle adjustments, self-care measures, and medications, which can minimize the risk of diabetes-related and cardiovascular complications (eg, heart attacks and strokes). Learning to manage diabetes is a process that continues over a lifetime. The diagnosis of diabetes can be overwhelming at the beginning; however, most people are able to lead normal lives, and many patients become experts in their own care. This topic review discusses the role of insulin in blood sugar control for patients with type 2 diabetes. Separate topic reviews about other aspects of type 2 diabetes are also available. (See "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Overview (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Alcohol, exercise, and medical care (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Preventing complications in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)".) IMPORTANCE OF BLOOD SUGAR CONTROL IN TYPE 2 DIABETES Keeping blood sugar levels in control is one way to decrease the risk of complications related to type 2 diabetes. The most common complication of type 2 diabetes is heart d Continue reading >>

Do You Worry About Getting Insulin Shots For Type 2 Diabetes?

Do You Worry About Getting Insulin Shots For Type 2 Diabetes?

When your doctor says you have type 2 diabetes, you may worry about getting shots of insulin to control the disease. But that’s seldom the first step, and some people don’t need insulin for years — or ever. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin, as the body is unable to use it properly. Without insulin, blood glucose (sugar) levels rise. High blood glucose levels can damage your organs, including blood vessels, nerves, kidneys and eyes. But with lifestyle changes and medications, many people are staying healthier longer with type 2 diabetes. Endocrinologist Richard Shewbridge, MD, says there is lot you can do to live well with diabetes. What’s behind type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes develops because the body becomes resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas to turn blood sugar into energy. “Type 2 diabetes means the process to turn food into energy isn’t working as well,” says Dr. Shewbridge. Poor choices in diet and lack of exercise work to worsen insulin resistance, he says. And genetics can play a role, too. Additionally, people with type 2 diabetes tend to make less and less insulin over time and that causes a rise in blood sugar after meals. The role of eating right and exercising Many people with type 2 diabetes aren’t put on medication right away. Your doctor will likely suggest changes in your eating and exercise habits first. “Once someone is put on medication, they may need it for the rest of their life. But, they also can treat diabetes with a healthy lifestyle and exercise,” says Dr. Shewbridge. Healthier eating habits are a good place to start. “Cut out simple sugars. Eat less starchy bread, pasta, noodles and cereal. These foods don’t necessarily taste sweet, but they break down Continue reading >>

Patient With Type 2 Diabetes

Patient With Type 2 Diabetes

Perioperative Treatment of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Patients with type 2 diabetes make up the majority of individuals requiring lower-limb surgery. However, many patients with type 2 diabetes require insulin for optimal glycemic control and therefore can be managed perioperatively like patients with type 1 diabetes. Being similar to type 1 patients, these patients should receive a continuous insulin infusion for procedures requiring general anesthesia (Fig. 19-6) and can receive basal subcutaneous insulin (NPH, glargine, or detemir) for procedures with local anesthesia (Fig. 19-7). We have found that a greater number of patients with type 2 diabetes receive excessive basal insulin; therefore, we recommend giving only 60% to 80% of the usual dose the evening before surgery. Patients who are well controlled at home with diet alone require only hourly blood glucose monitoring during surgery; however, should blood glucose exceed 150 to 180 mg/dL, an intravenous insulin infusion should be implemented promptly. Fasting blood glucose levels exceeding 200 mg/dL indicate an absolute insulin deficiency,63 while blood glucose levels exceeding 180 mg/dL exceed the renal threshold and result in glucose spilling in the urine. It is not uncommon for previously well controlled patients to require insulin infusion therapy due to a hyperglycemic response to surgery. In addition, infection requiring lower-limb surgery contributes to insulin resistance and increases the propensity to insulin infusion therapy. There is some disagreement regarding the management strategies for patients requiring general anesthesia whose diabetes is well controlled with oral agents. We agree with Alberti64 and recommend withholding all oral therapies for diabetes the morning of surgery. An insulin infusi Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes

Managing Diabetes

You can manage your diabetes and live a long and healthy life by taking care of yourself each day. Diabetes can affect almost every part of your body. Therefore, you will need to manage your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar. Managing your blood glucose, as well as your blood pressure and cholesterol, can help prevent the health problems that can occur when you have diabetes. How can I manage my diabetes? With the help of your health care team, you can create a diabetes self-care plan to manage your diabetes. Your self-care plan may include these steps: Ways to manage your diabetes Manage your diabetes ABCs Knowing your diabetes ABCs will help you manage your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Stopping smoking if you smoke will also help you manage your diabetes. Working toward your ABC goals can help lower your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes problems. A for the A1C test The A1C test shows your average blood glucose level over the past 3 months. The A1C goal for many people with diabetes is below 7 percent. Ask your health care team what your goal should be. B for Blood pressure The blood pressure goal for most people with diabetes is below 140/90 mm Hg. Ask what your goal should be. C for Cholesterol You have two kinds of cholesterol in your blood: LDL and HDL. LDL or “bad” cholesterol can build up and clog your blood vessels. Too much bad cholesterol can cause a heart attack or stroke. HDL or “good” cholesterol helps remove the “bad” cholesterol from your blood vessels. Ask your health care team what your cholesterol numbers should be. If you are over 40 years of age, you may need to take a statin drug for heart health. S for Stop smoking Not smoking is especially important for people with diabetes beca Continue reading >>

Type 2s: Time For Insulin?

Type 2s: Time For Insulin?

Insulin has the most wonderful reputation among people with type 2 diabetes. Many view it the same way as moving to a nursing home (or Florida retirement community)… just one short step away from the grave. But nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, taking insulin keeps you as far away from the mortician as possible. Despite recent advances in medical therapy, insulin remains the most potent and effective treatment for elevated blood glucose. It is a more natural substance than pills (chemically similar to the insulin produced by the body), and lacks many of the potential side-effects inherent to oral medications. Today, there are more than 15 million people with type 2 diabetes in the United States, and more than 3 million take insulin. But many more people should probably be taking insulin. Here is why: Nature of the DiaBeast Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition. It gets worse over time. It usually starts out as a state of mild insulin resistance: the insulin produced by the pancreas is not properly utilized by the body’s cells. This result is a gradual increase in the blood sugar level, which promotes increased insulin production by the pancreas. Eventually, the pancreas is unable to make enough insulin to overcome the insulin resistance, and glucose levels rise high enough to require medical treatment. All this time, the pancreas is working harder and harder to secrete as much insulin as possible. Just like a machine that is strained and overworked, the insulin-producing cells eventually burn out and cease to function. This is why the treatment for type 2 diabetes tends to become more aggressive over time. Initially, many people with type 2 diabetes can control their blood sugar through exercise (which improves insulin sensitivity) and a hea Continue reading >>

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