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Does Humalog Need To Be Refrigerated

Humalog Kwikpen

Humalog Kwikpen

Generic Name: insulin lispro (IN soo lin LISS pro) Brand Name: HumaLOG, HumaLOG Cartridge, HumaLOG KwikPen, HumaLOG KwikPen (Concentrated) What is Humalog KwikPen? Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Humalog KwikPen is a fast-acting insulin that starts to work about 15 minutes after injection, peaks in about 1 hour, and keeps working for 2 to 4 hours. Humalog KwikPen is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Humalog KwikPen is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. Humalog KwikPen is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 3 years old. Humalog KwikPen may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important Information Never share an injection pen, cartridge, or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Before taking this medicine You should not use Humalog KwikPen if you are allergic to it, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humalog KwikPen should not be given to a child younger than 3 years old. This medicine should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure Humalog KwikPen is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. Follow your doctor's instructions about using insulin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby. Blood sugar control is very important during pregnancy, and your dose needs may be different dur Continue reading >>

Flying With Insulin

Flying With Insulin

I recently received an e-mail asking about insulin storage conditions while flying from the United Kingdom to the United States. Paraphrased, it read: _"I use pens for diabetes control, containing Humalog and Lantus, which I store in a kitchen refrigerator. In a few weeks, I will travel to Texas. I will leave home at 3:00 am, drive to Heathrow and finally reach the motel in Texas at approximately 10:00 pm (UK Local time) (travel time of 19 hours). There is a refrigerator in the hotel room. I will need to take 4 pens of Humalog and 3 pens of Lantus insulin. Unfortunately the airline will not allow the boxed pens to be stored in the on-board refrigerator. What do you recommend I do? I can identify the following four options: Carry them in my hand luggage taking no extra precautions, and leaving them at room temperature in the hotel? Carry them in my hand luggage and put them in the hotel room refrigerator on arrival? Pack them in my checked luggage. I am sure the hold temperature is much colder than cabin temperature? Pack them in a small cooler surrounded by cubes of ice, which may cause a problem with airport security? I am at a loss what to do."_ My reply was as follows: _"I fly with insulin regularly, and have my own opinions for you to consider. Be sure to carry prescriptions signed by your physician in case someone asks about your supplies (the only time this happened to me was when I was flying from Canada to the US & the Canadians asked me)._ _For USA info on flying with diabetes supplies, see the US TSA website. Also see Your Traveling Medical Record and Travel Letter. I would make the following comments about the options you presented: Yes, but there’s some risk of overheating in summer. The present pen can stay at room temp, but spares should probably be kept Continue reading >>

Insulin And Refrigeration.

Insulin And Refrigeration.

Hi, I read through the newest 5 pages and found nothing related to this so I decided to post about it (sorry if it has been discussed before) I use Humalog (vial, 10ml) and always keep it cold and safe inside my refrigerator . I know it can be left at room temperature for one month without being spoiled, but I prefer to keep it refrigerated due to a belief I have (and here comes the question) that the effect of the insulin dwindles away (a little bit) when kept at room temperature. So I would like to ask people who use non-refrigerated vials or pens with cartridges who have noticed difference on its effect when the container is new from when it's almost empty (for example, needing 4 units for a pack of Doritos when it's new, but 5 or 6 units for the same pack when the vial or cartridge is almost empty). PS: I know what the manufacturers say, but I want to know what happens in reality EDIT: One more thing. My 10ml vial always lasts 1.5 or 2 months, and that's another reason why I keep it refrigerated, because I've heard about people who throw away their insulin container (vial or cartridge) after 1 month (expiration date) no matter it still has insulin in it. I use it until I drain my vial and the insulin still works fine after 1.5 or 2 months after opening it. Am I doing something wrong? Does doing this has any side-effect? Last edited by chuichi; 3/18/09 at 12:50 AM. Moderator Type1 - Minimed 640G - Enlite CGM When I was on insulin pens they lasted me an entire month as I am on a small dose. I never noticed any difference between day one (as in just out of the fridge) to day 30. Now that I am pumping I go through insulin faster (more waste), but a vial still lasts me quite a while, and still I do not notice any difference in potency of the insulin. D.D. Family IDDM. P Continue reading >>

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

Editor’s comment: The commentary by Dr. Grajower has such important clinical relevance that responses were invited from the three pharmaceutical companies that supply insulin in the U.S. and the American Diabetes Association, and all of these combined in this commentary. The commenting letter and individual responses were authored separately and are completely independent of each other. Diabetic patients treated with insulin, whether for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, are prone to often unexplained swings in their blood glucose. These swings can vary from dangerously low to persistently high levels. Most diabetic patients, and most physicians, will adjust insulin regimens so as to avoid hypoglycemia at the expense of hyperglycemia. Among the “textbook” reasons for variable glucose responses to any given insulin regimen are 1) site of administration, 2) exercise, 3) bottles not adequately mixed before drawing the insulin (for NPH, Lente, or Ultralente), and 4) duration of treatment with insulin (1). A new insulin was marketed by Aventis Pharmaceuticals about 1 year ago, insulin glargine (Lantus). The manufacturer seemed to stress that patients not use a started bottle of this insulin for >28 days (2). Two patients of mine highlighted this point. L.K. is a 76-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, diagnosed at 55 years of age, and treated with insulin since age 56. Her insulin regimen was changed to Lantus at night together with Novolog before meals. She monitors her blood glucose four times a day. She used a bottle of Lantus until it ran out; therefore, a bottle lasted for 2 months. Her recent HbA1c was 7.6%. I retrospectively analyzed her home glucose readings by averaging her fasting blood glucose levels for the first 15 days of a new bottle and the last 15 days of tha Continue reading >>

Information Regarding Insulin Storage And Switching Between Products In An Emergency

Information Regarding Insulin Storage And Switching Between Products In An Emergency

en Español Insulin Storage and Effectiveness Insulin for Injection Insulin from various manufacturers is often made available to patients in an emergency and may be different from a patient's usual insulin. After a disaster, patients in the affected area may not have access to refrigeration. According to the product labels from all three U.S. insulin manufacturers, it is recommended that insulin be stored in a refrigerator at approximately 36°F to 46°F. Unopened and stored in this manner, these products maintain potency until the expiration date on the package. Insulin products contained in vials or cartridges supplied by the manufacturers (opened or unopened) may be left unrefrigerated at a temperature between 59°F and 86°F for up to 28 days and continue to work. However, an insulin product that has been altered for the purpose of dilution or by removal from the manufacturer’s original vial should be discarded within two weeks. Note: Insulin loses some effectiveness when exposed to extreme temperatures. The longer the exposure to extreme temperatures, the less effective the insulin becomes. This can result in loss of blood glucose control over time. Under emergency conditions, you might still need to use insulin that has been stored above 86°F. You should try to keep insulin as cool as possible. If you are using ice, avoid freezing the insulin. Do not use insulin that has been frozen. Keep insulin away from direct heat and out of direct sunlight. When properly stored insulin becomes available again, the insulin vials that have been exposed to these extreme conditions should be discarded and replaced as soon as possible. If patients or healthcare providers have specific questions about the suitability of their insulin, they may call the respective manufacturer a Continue reading >>

Insulin Storage And Refrigeration

Insulin Storage And Refrigeration

I had an insulin-dependent type 2 patient who was on Solostar Pens of Glargine 65u hs and Apidra 18u tid plus sliding scale for glucose control. The patient got their insulin from a mail order pharmacy, 90 days supply at a time. The patient was in fairly good control with a prior A1c of 6.9 and an average fasting of 122mg/dl. I got a call from the patient’s husband on Friday evening at 5 pm because his wife had had a glucose reading of 245 mg/dl at 3:30pm after taking an Apidra dose of 21 units before lunch. He told me that she had taken another 14 units at 2 pm and now at 5 pm the glucose was up to 319 mg/dl…. My first thought was that there was something wrong with the insulin because the bottle was almost empty so I instructed them to get a new vial of Apidra and try dosing 7 units then call me back in 2 hours. At 7:30 pm I got a call and the patient was at 325 mg/dl and was in a panic. I had them go to the refrigerator and grab all the vials of Apidra. The patient came back to the phone with 6 unopened boxes of insulin. I had them check the expiration dates, which were all good and then I had them open each box. After the third box was opened I knew the reason for the glucose problems. There were ice crystals in the bottle because the insulin had been frozen. Whenever insulin freezes there is a possibility that it will no longer be effective. I found out from the patient that some of the bottles had got pushed to the far back corner of the fridge and must have frozen. I called a 24-hour pharmacy with a new prescription for the Apidra and the patient’s glucose was back under control by midnight. Lesson Learned For this particular patient the storage spot of insulin in the refrigerator caused the insulin to freeze but when the patient got the single new box out Continue reading >>

Keeping An Eye On Your Insulin

Keeping An Eye On Your Insulin

For millions of people with diabetes, technology has supplied us with wonderful, helpful aids to help control blood sugar. While some of these medications come in pill form and remain stable when stored out of light and at moderate temperatures, people with diabetes who use insulin need to depend on more than technology to make sure their insulin is in top form. As associate dean and professor of pharmacy at Washington State University, a certified diabetes educator and a person with diabetes for more than 50 years, Keith Campbell knows the importance of keeping an eye on insulin. Campbell believes that establishing a routine surrounding insulin use helps ensure the product stays potent and stable. Step One: Check the Label Campbell advises that the first thing a person with diabetes should do is check the insulin’s expiration date, even before leaving the pharmacy. “Drug companies and the FDA are very conservative with the dates,” says Campbell. This means they tend set expiration date at the earliest time the insulin could possibly go bad, and sometimes even earlier. Sofia Iqbal, RPh, a drug information scientist with Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals, confirms this. “Expiration dates and storage guidelines are based on stability data obtained for batches of each formulation of insulin,” Iqbal says. She adds that the dates are valid as long as the insulin is kept stored under the correct conditions. “Never use insulin after the expiration date printed on the label and carton,” Iqbal warns. If you get your insulin home and discover the expiration date has passed, what should you do? Campbell advises that you return it to the pharmacy immediately for replacement. Step Two: Examine the Insulin Eli Lilly and Company’s Kara Appell, RPh, a medical information adm Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Lispro (humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog Kwikpen, Humalog Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Lispro (humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog Kwikpen, Humalog Pen)?

HUMALOG (insulin lispro) Injection DESCRIPTION HUMALOG® (insulin lispro injection) is a rapid-acting human insulin analog used to lower blood glucose. Insulin lispro is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. Insulin lispro differs from human insulin in that the amino acid proline at position B28 is replaced by lysine and the lysine in position B29 is replaced by proline. Chemically, it is Lys(B28), Pro(B29) human insulin analog and has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 and a molecular weight of 5808, both identical to that of human insulin. HUMALOG has the following primary structure: HUMALOG is a sterile, aqueous, clear, and colorless solution. Each milliliter of HUMALOG U-100 contains insulin lispro 100 units, 16 mg glycerin, 1.88 mg dibasic sodium phosphate, 3.15 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.0197 mg zinc ion, trace amounts of phenol, and Water for Injection. Insulin lispro has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. The pH is adjusted by addition of aqueous solutions of hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10%. Each milliliter of HUMALOG U-200 contains insulin lispro 200 units, 16 mg glycerin, 5 mg tromethamine, 3.15 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.046 mg zinc ion, trace amounts of phenol, and Water for Injection. Insulin lispro has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. The pH is adjusted by addition of aqueous solutions of hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10%. font size A A A 1 2 3 4 5 Next What is Type 2 Diabetes? The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes, formerly called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or "adult onset" diabetes, so-called because it typically develops in adults over age 35, though it can develop at any age. Type 2 diabetes i Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens Are Welcome Back To The Fridge!

Insulin Pens Are Welcome Back To The Fridge!

We all know that unopened insulin must be kept in the refrigerator. But once in use can we put it back in the fridge to protect it from excessive heat? The answer to this simple question is not as easy as one might think. All manufacturers explicitly recommend to ‘Not refrigerate’ insulin pens in use. This guideline that causes confusion among users is now being revoked by one manufacturer. Let’s try to understand the reasoning behind it and what it means for users now. What? I shouldn’t put my insulin pen back in the refrigerator? When it comes to storing medications, it is recommended you follow the leaflet or packaging instructions. For insulin in particular, there are two different situations: storing and in-use. · Before Opening: When insulin is to be stored long-term and has not been opened, keeping it in the fridge ensures it lasts until expiration date. · During Use: Once a vial, a cartridge or a new disposable pen are used for the first time, the insulin can be kept at room temperature. But it needs to be used within weeks. It makes sense: higher temperatures and an open product mean a shorter shelf life. But there is one extra sentence on insulin pens packages, which has caused quite some confusion: Pens in use — ‘Do not refrigerate.’ What does ‘do not refrigerate’ mean for users? Let’s take a trip back to 2003, when the recommendation to not refrigerate opened insulin first appeared. Take Lilly’s Humalog for example, for which the label was first altered 14-years ago: What was the reason behind this? People started to speculate this warning was a result of preventing any kind of temperature extremes from affecting the insulin once it is in use. Many insulin users know from experience that high temperature can lower the effectiveness of Continue reading >>

How To Store Insulin

How To Store Insulin

Insulin is measured in units. Most bottles, cartridges, and pens of insulin sold in the United States have 100 units of insulin per milliliter of fluid and are labeled U-100. Different strengths, like U-500, also are available in the U.S. Different strengths are used in other countries. It's important to know the type of insulin you take and whether it should appear cloudy or clear. When you prepare to use a bottle, cartridge, or pen, check the insulin: NPH should look uniformly cloudy after you gently roll the bottle or pen. All other insulin should look clear. If your insulin doesn't look right, don't use it. Take it back to your pharmacy. Don't shake your insulin. Gently roll it. Don't toss it around or handle it roughly. If you don't handle your insulin correctly, it's more likely to clump or frost. Don't use the insulin if you can see clumps after you gently roll the bottle or pen, or if the sides look frosted. Storage Guidelines Take steps to store your insulin correctly, or it might not work. Keep your insulin away from heat and light. Any insulin that you don't store in the refrigerator should be kept as cool as possible (between 56°F and 80°F.) Never let your insulin freeze. If your insulin freezes, don't use it, even after it's thawed. Keep unused bottles, cartridges, and pens of insulin in the refrigerator (between 36°F and 46°F). If stored properly, these will be good until the expiration date listed on the insulin. Keep insulin cartridges and pens that you're currently using at room temperature (between 56°F and 80°F.) Expiration Guidelines An open insulin bottle, cartridge, or pen is only good for a limited time. Follow these guidelines for discarding insulin: Glargine (Lantus): Discard opened bottles, pens, and cartridges 28 days after you've starte Continue reading >>

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

After removing insulin glargine (Lantus) from the refrigerator for use, can it be refrigerated over and over again after having warmed to room temperature, or does this degrade it? Continue reading >>

Does Humalog Need To Be Refrigerated - Medhelp

Does Humalog Need To Be Refrigerated - Medhelp

Common Questions and Answers about Does humalog need to be refrigerated The amount of insulin you take does not depend on the types of diabetes but depends on the amount of carbohydrates you intake. on a side note, the vial of insulin that you currently using does not have to be refrigerated . They are good at room temperature for 30 days. you only need to refrigerate the vials that you don't use. However, if you think you are better off with a humalog pen, then you should ask your health care provider for me because it is your health... When it comes to life or death matters, all absolutely MUST be able to carry the same load, and must be able to survive if supplies are not able to be delivered. If a person cannot survive under those conditions, they cannot be accepted into military service. It is only fair to the other military people to only accept those that can fully serve without any preference. Like you, I am fully healthy. But you must be realistic and accept the fact that we absolutely must have that insulin. Hi, i see it's been a while since you posted your question on Victoza and weight loss. The first 7 days of taking this medicine and watching my calorie and nutrient intake, i've lost 7 lbs. in 7 days. i was no happy about taking this, since i have hypo-thyroid & there were 3 months my regular thyroid medication was off the market. Copyright 1994-2018 MedHelp. All rights reserved. MedHelp is a division of Vitals Consumer Services, LLC. The Content on this Site is presented in a summary fashion, and is intended to be used for educational and entertainment purposes only. It is not intended to be and should not be interpreted as medical advice or a diagnosis of any health or fitness problem, condition or disease; or a recommendation for a specific test, docto Continue reading >>

Can Humalog Handle The Heat?

Can Humalog Handle The Heat?

See also: Kinetic vs Dynamics and User's Reports Humalog is a terrific insulin that improves postmeal readings, reduces the frequency of lows, and generally makes people feel better. But reports from people on both pumps and injections have surfaced indicating that Humalog has trouble handling the heat. These reports began to appear just after Humalog was released. Most insulins are relatively stable in hot weather, and lose potency only with unusually high temperatures (i.e., a non-refrigerated delivery truck with a flat tire in Phoenix in August). However, Humalog has gained a reputation for wanting to stay in your refrigerator, raising concerns about how your insulin is handled in transit to your pharmacy or home. Users report random, unexpected high blood sugars that correct when a new bottle of Humalog is started. Inspection of the bad bottle reveals either 1) several very tiny particles, much smaller than those typically found in a bad bottle of Regular, 2) one or two large hazy particles, or 3) small particles attached to the insides of the bottle. Healthy Humalog will appear as pure as clear water, with no particles or haze. Insulin pumps may be especially prone to unexpected highs because they use only Humalog. Heat-related problems typically start after three to four days use in a pump, or, when a bad bottle is encountered, immediately after first use of that bottle. On injections, the problem typically shows up as unexpected high readings after meals. Research studies undertaken so far have indicated no problem with use of Humalog in pumps. Prior to Humalog's release, Lilly conducted extensive heat and stability testing, and believed that it was as stable as Regular insulin which has an excellent history. But in the larger lab of the world, a loss of activit Continue reading >>

Why Humalog® U-100?

Why Humalog® U-100?

You may have been taking a long-acting insulin for a while now. So why did your doctor prescribe another insulin? Well, it’s to help control the blood sugar spikes that happen naturally when you eat. Everyone gets them, but when you have diabetes you may need extra help controlling them. That’s where Humalog comes in. Humalog is different than your long-acting insulin. Long-acting insulin helps control your blood sugar throughout the whole day. Humalog is fast-acting insulin—it helps control the blood sugar spikes that happen naturally when you eat. Humalog is available in the Humalog U-100 KwikPen, which is portable and easy to use. And, since it shouldn’t be refrigerated after the first use, you can take it just about anywhere. Continue reading >>

Traveling With Insulin

Traveling With Insulin

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if you didn’t have to bother to refrigerate your insulin when you travel? I’m sure that in the past the need to have a refrigerator nearby kept many of us from adventure travel in the third world. Gel keeps insulin cool for 48 hours. While you do have to keep your insulin cool, you don’t have to strap a portable refrigerator to your back while you attempt your first ascent of Mt. Everest. Paddling down the Amazon can also be a bit inconvenient with a refrigerator. There are many more likely trips where you might think you need to have a refrigerator for your insulin. For example, I recently booked a short vacation in a cottage on Northern California’s Russian River. My wife, who uses both insulin cartridges and vials, insisted that we get a kitchenette so she could refrigerate the insulin. The kitchenette with its refrigerator wasn’t necessary, as we later realized. We could have used an insulin carrying case that included a cold pack. Our experience, however, had been only with those carrying cases that were tethered to refrigeration. The packs stay cold only until the ice in them melts, requiring repeated visits to the fridge. We were not familiar with a British company, Frio UK Ltd., which until recently had only limited representation in the United States. Frio’s cooling wallets keep insulin cool and safe for up to 45 hours—up to five times longer than ice packs—even if the temperature outside is 100°F. You activate the wallet by immersing it in cold water for 10 to 15 minutes. That makes the crystals in the panels of the wallet expand into a gel that will remain cool for several days with Frio’s patented process. Even though it makes use of evaporation to stay cool, the Frio wallet will remain dry to the touch after you Continue reading >>

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