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Does Gestational Diabetes Run In Families

Diabetes And The Family

Diabetes And The Family

The World Health Organisation now advises that the relations of people with type 2 diabetes should take precautions. The dietary and exercise advice really apply to every person (whether related to people with diabetes or not), but regular sugar checks are not usually necessary for relations of type 1 diabetics. Some of the genes that are passed on from parents to children have been found. Visit the American Diabetes Association for further information, as they publish new reports each month. A recent study found that losing weight, and having a healthy diet with regular exercise, can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by more than 50%. here. We need to change the way we live...and Government and local Government needs to help at a local level. For everyone (but especially the relations of type 2 diabetics) A healthy lifestyle can delay and even prevent diabetes, even if it is your family and you have inherited the 'diabetic' genes (Lancet 09). Regular exercise such as swimming, cycling, or walking helps to delay or prevent diabetes: 30 minutes a day is the recommended minimum, but 90 minutes a day is needed to lose weight. Exercise is proven to prevent diabetes. Gaining weight increases the risk of diabetes 2-3 times at least. A healthy diet helps to delay or prevent diabetes (see below). Smoking is harmful; it damages the arteries and can double the problems that diabetes can itself cause. Smoking doubles the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Even passive smoking increase the risk. See For the relations of type 2 diabetics, the World Health Organisation recommends a fasting blood sugar test every 3 years. Sunlight also prevents diabetes, mainly type 2, but also to a lesser degree type 1. Thus Bangladeshi immigrants to the UK are thought to be very prone to type 2 di Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Family History: How Much Risk Is Genetic?

Diabetes And Family History: How Much Risk Is Genetic?

Whether you have Type I or Type II diabetes, there are several factors that could have contributed to the disease. Among these are your family’s lifestyle and your genetic history. By gaining a better understanding of these two issues, you may be able to control your diabetes with more ease, or possibly (in the case of Type II) avoid it altogether. At the very least, understanding the risks created by your genetic and family history will allow you to detect diabetes earlier and avoid the damage it can do if left untreated. How Family Affects Diabetes Risk Your family affects your diabetes risk in two different ways. First, of course, your parents contributed to your genetic heritage. But there’s also the way your parents, your siblings, and your extended family may have influenced the way you eat, exercise, and care for yourself, because these are habits you learn from the people around you as you grow up. Your genetic makeup can play a big role in both Type I and Type II diabetes, while the way a family cares for itself and the habits you’re taught in regard to diet and exercise are generally more related to Type II risk. To help prevent Type II diabetes if you don’t have the disease yet or if you’re prediabetic, there are four questions the NIDDK suggests you ask your family. These are: Does anyone in your family have Type II diabetes and if so, who are they? Has anyone in your family been told they may develop diabetes or are at risk for it? Has anyone in your family been told they need to get more exercise or lose weight in order to prevent diabetes? Did your mother have diabetes when she was pregnant, either with me or with a sibling? Type II diabetes can be greatly affected by the lifestyle a family lives. As you grow up and get older you learn a lot of Continue reading >>

Is Gestational Diabetes Hereditary?

Is Gestational Diabetes Hereditary?

Your chances of developing gestational diabetes (GD) are higher if a close relative, like your mum, or your sister, have had it. That's because diabetes can run in families. Your chances of developing GD are also increased if: You have a BMI above 30. You've already had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (9lb 15oz) or more. You had GD in a previous pregnancy. Your family origins are Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, African Caribbean or Middle Eastern. There's some evidence that polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) increases your risk of developing GD. If you have PCOS, talk to your midwife about whether you should be tested. As you have a family history of diabetes, your midwife will offer you a glucose tolerance test (GTT) to check your blood sugar levels between 24 weeks and 28 weeks of your pregnancy. GD is rare before 20 weeks, and often doesn't have noticeable symptoms, but tell your doctor or midwife if you have any of the following: tiredness dry mouth excessive thirst frequent need to wee recurring infections, such as thrush Some of these symptoms are common in pregnancy, so you'll still need to have the GTT to diagnose GD. There are no guaranteed ways to avoid GD, but you can reduce your chances of getting it by: Eating a healthy diet. Choose foods that are low in saturated fat and sugar, and which have a low glycaemic index (low GI). Your body has to work harder to digest low-GI foods, so sugars are released slowly. Eating three meals a day, with two to four snacks in between, rather than going hungry and then having a big meal. Keeping your weight gain within healthy limits. Gaining a lot of weight in pregnancy increases your chances of getting GD. Keeping active. Try to fit in a walk every day - it helps your body to regulate your blood sugar levels if you take a half-hour Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And The Family

Gestational Diabetes And The Family

In short, the hormones from the placenta causes increased insulin resistance. As a partner, family member or friend to a mother diagnosed with gestational diabetes it is important to know that the mother has done nothing wrong to cause diagnosis. Some ladies are at higher risk of developing the condition and others have no risks what so ever and still develop gestational diabetes. Diabetes is caused by too much glucose (sugar) in the blood. The amount of glucose in the blood is controlled by a hormonecalled 'insulin'. During pregnancy, the body produces a number of hormones, such as oestrogen, progesterone and human placental lactogen (HPL). These hormones make the body insulin resistant, which means the cells respond less well to insulin and the level of glucose in the blood remains high. To cope with the increased amount of glucose in the blood, the pregnant body should produce more insulin. However, some women either cannot produce enough insulin in pregnancy to transport the glucose into the cells, or their body cells are more resistant to insulin. This is known as 'gestational diabetes mellitus'. Gestational diabetes can be defined as carbohydrate intolerance. For more information on gestational diabetes and diagnosis, please read more here . What does gestational diabetes mean for baby? Baby Freddie, read his mother's story here Gestational diabetes means that blood sugar levels within the mother remain high and this excess sugar is passed onto the growing baby. The result if not treated, can mean that the baby grows larger than it would normally, so many presume that "gestational diabetes just means a bigger baby". Unfortunately it is not as simple as your loved one just having a bigger, bouncing baby that they'll have to birth. Gestational diabetes is a serious Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Risk To Your Family Tree

Diabetes And The Risk To Your Family Tree

Diabetes and the Risk to Your Family Tree Illnesses and health issues can be hard for everyone. We all have concerns for our children and the children we dream of having. People with diabetes often have special concerns: Will my children develop diabetes because I have it? What if I develop gestational diabetes? My son is engaged to a woman with diabetes, I have one child with diabetes, should I be concerned about my other children? If diabetes runs high in my family, what can we do to prevent it in the little ones? Lets proceed with this interesting topic. My goal is to shed light in this area and pass on hope to many that may be concerned. Diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2 are actually two different diseases. They each have unique genetic patterns and likelihoods of potentially passing the disease down the family tree. We will discuss both types of diabetes as well as gestationaldiabetes. Gestational Diabetes is diabetes that is diagnosed during a pregnancy. If diabetes is diagnosed at the first prenatal visit using standard criteria for type 2 diabetes, it is considered type 2 diabetes not gestational diabetes. If diabetes appears after the first prenatal visit, then gestational diabetes would most likely be the diagnosis. It is recommended that the screening for gestational diabetes take place between the 24-28th week of pregnancy. (1) Will having a history of gestational diabetes affect my children? With the statistics in the United States showing that up to 18 percent of pregnancies are affected by gestational diabetes, this is a very important question to ask. (2) In a receipt study published July of 2014, researchers studied 255 obese adolescents. Two hundred and ten (210) of the subjects were not exposed to gestational diabetes in utero and 45 were exposed. Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Genetic? Facts About Hereditary Risk

Is Diabetes Genetic? Facts About Hereditary Risk

Diabetes is a complex set of diseases with no single cause. Genetic factors make some people more vulnerable to diabetes, particularly with the right environment. In addition, certain lifestyle factors can cause type 2 diabetes in individuals with no known family history. This complex interaction between genes, lifestyle, and environment points to the importance of taking steps to minimize individual diabetes risk. Is type 1 diabetes hereditary? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, which means that it causes the body's immune system to attack healthy cells. It is often called juvenile diabetes because most people are diagnosed in childhood, and the condition then lasts their lifetime. Doctors used to think type 1 diabetes was wholly genetic. Newer studies have shown, however, that children develop type 1 diabetes 3 percent of the time if their mother has the condition, 5 percent of the time if their father has it, or 8 percent if a sibling has type 1 diabetes. Consequently, researchers now believe that something in the environment has to trigger type 1 diabetes. Some risk factors include: Cold weather. People develop type 1 diabetes in winter more frequently than summer. It is also more common in places with cool climates. Viruses. Researchers think some viruses might activate type 1 diabetes in people who are otherwise vulnerable. Measles, mumps, coxsackie B virus, and rotavirus have been linked to type 1 diabetes. Research suggests that people who develop type 1 diabetes may have autoimmune antibodies in their blood for many years before showing symptoms. As a result, the disease may develop over time, or something may have to activate the autoimmune antibodies for symptoms to appear. Is type 2 diabetes hereditary? Type 2 diabetes is the more common form of the d Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 10 Deadliest Myths

Diabetes: 10 Deadliest Myths

Myth: Diabetes Doesn't Run in My Family, So I'm Safe Many people develop diabetes despite the fact that they have no family history of the disease. Heredity certainly plays a role, but studies involving identical twins show it is not the only factor. When one twin has type 1 diabetes, the other has a fifty-fifty chance of having it, too. For type 2 diabetes, twins are more likely to share the diagnosis - the odds of the second twin having it can be as high as 75 percent. But even then, the reason may be that their diets and weight gain are similar. Bottom line? To minimize your risk for diabetes, you need to exercise and watch what you eat no matter what your family history is. Myth: Diabetes Is Caused by Eating Carbohydrates Diabetes is least common in the population groups whose diets emphasize carbohydrates. Take Japan, where rice is a traditional staple. Prior to 1980, fewer than 5 percent of the adult population there had diabetes. But once fast food and meat started to displace rice, diabetes became much more prevalent. By 1990 the prevalence of diabetes in Japan had doubled. In the U.S., the risk for type 2 diabetes is highest among frequent meat-eaters. Vegans have the lowest risk, and other groups (semi-vegetarians, fish-eaters, and lacto-ovo-vegetarians) are in between. The real problem seems to be not carbohydrates, but fatty foods. Myth: I'm Not Fat, So I Won't Get Diabetes Staying slim cuts the risk dramatically, but thin people can certainly develop diabetes. The condition arises when the cells in the body become resistant to insulin, the hormone that escorts blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Doctors think insulin resistance is caused by the build-up of microscopic fat droplets inside cells - especially muscle cells and fat cells. This can occur even in so Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

This pregnancy complication is more common than you might think. Learn who's at risk for it, how it's detected, and what can be done to treat it. For years, doctors believed that gestational diabetes affected three to five percent of all pregnancies, but new, more rigorous diagnostic criteria puts the number closer to 18 percent. The condition, which can strike any pregnant woman, usually develops in the second trimester, between weeks 24 and 28, and typically resolves after baby is born. If gestational diabetes is treated and well-managed throughout your pregnancy, "There's no reason you can't deliver a very healthy baby," says Patricia Devine, M.D., perinatologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. But gestational diabetes that goes untreated, or isn't carefully monitored, can be harmful for both mother and baby. Consult our guide for risk factors, signs of gestational diabetes, and treatment options. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes, or diabetes that is diagnosed during pregnancy in a woman who previously did not have diabetes, occurs when the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar efficiently. "A hormone produced by the placenta makes a woman essentially resistant to her own insulin," Dr. Devine explains. How does gestational diabetes differ from type 1 or 2 diabetes? Gestational diabetes affects only pregnant women. People who have type 1 diabetes, sometimes referred to as juvenile diabetes, are generally born with it. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95 percent of all cases of diabetes in the U.S.; it occurs in adulthood, and is triggered by lifestyle factors such as obesity and lack of physical activity. What causes it? It's unclear why some women develop gestational diabetes while others do not. Doctors th Continue reading >>

Are Pregnancy Conditions Hereditary?

Are Pregnancy Conditions Hereditary?

Your first pregnancy is full of unknowns (hey, even your second one can be a bit of a mystery), which is why youre eager for info on what to expect. So when your mother-in-law mentions that huge babies run in her family or your own mom says she had a bad bout of morning sickness, of course youre wondering if youre in for those same pregnancy issues. From long labors to gestational diabetes, here are some common pregnancy and labor conditions and info on which ones are hereditary. If your mother or sister had morning sickness , you might want to start stocking up on saltines and ginger ale now. Studies have found a strong genetic link to this nauseating rite of passage, especially in severe cases. Even if you are predisposed to pregnancy queasiness, you can still combat it by always keeping some food in your stomach, sticking to foods that appeal to you and are easily digestible, and talking to your doctor about taking B6 supplements, which can nix nausea. Miscarriage is so common that almost everyone can point to a family member whos had one. In fact, virtually every woman will have at least one (which may occur so early that you might not even notice!). The good news: Even if Mom had a miscarriage or two, youre not destined for the same. Still, its not a bad idea to mention the family history to your practitioner. In extremely rare instances, a genetic issue, such as a chromosome abnormality called balanced translocation, can cause repeat miscarriages. Yes, unfortunately, youre at a higher risk for gestational diabetes if any kind of diabetes runs in your family, especially if a sibling or parent has the condition. But your fate isnt sealed. You can beat the odds if you maintain a healthy weight by eating well (skip the ice-cream binges) and exercising regularly durin Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes -- The Basics

Gestational Diabetes -- The Basics

Gestational diabetes -- diabetes that develops during pregnancy -- is a relatively common complication of pregnancy, affecting about 6% of all pregnant women. You may have a greater risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: Are obese when you become pregnant Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large (greater than 9 pounds) baby before Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or suffering from certain birth defects Have had gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies Have a family history of diabetes Come from certain ethnic backgrounds, including African, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, or Pacific Islander Are older than 30 But half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no risk factors. If left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause serious complications for your newborn. For example, babies of untreated mothers with gestational diabetes may grow too large (called macrosomia), increasing the risk of problems during delivery, such as injuries to the baby's shoulders and arms and nerves in these areas. Having a very large baby may also increase your risk for requiring a cesarean section or other assistance during delivery (such as a forceps or vacuum delivery). Your baby may also experience a sudden drop in blood sugar after birth, requiring treatment with a sugar solution given through a needle in the vein. Your newborn baby may also have a higher risk of developing jaundice (a condition that causes yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes) and breathing problems. The risk of birth defects in infants whose mothers have gestational diabetes is very low because most pregnant women develop gestational diabetes after the 20th week of pregnancy, when the fetus has already fully developed. The risk of birt Continue reading >>

Inherited Destiny? Genetics And Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Inherited Destiny? Genetics And Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Inherited destiny? Genetics and gestational diabetes mellitus 1Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, 1540 Alcazar St, CHP-220, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9011, USA 1Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, 1540 Alcazar St, CHP-220, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9011, USA This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Despite years of investigation, very little is known about the genetic predisposition for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). However, the advent of genome-wide association and identification of loci contributing to susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus has opened a small window into the genetics of GDM. More importantly, the study of the genetics of GDM has not only illuminated potential new biology underlying diabetes in pregnancy, but has also provided insights into fetal outcomes. Here, I review some of the insights into GDM and fetal outcomes gained through the study of both rare and common genetic variation. I also discuss whether recent testing of type 2 diabetes mellitus susceptibility loci in GDM case-control samples changes views of whether GDM is a distinct form of diabetes. Finally, I examine how the study of susceptibility loci can be used to influence clinical care, one of the great promises of the new era of human genome analysis. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) refers to hyperglycemia that first presents during pregnancy and typically resolves itself post-partum. There are inadequate data on the prevalence of GDM; however, in 1988 it was estimated that about 4% of pregnancies in the United States were complicated by diabetes, with 88% of these accounted for by GDM [ 1 ]. More recent data suggest that, as with the overall increased prevalence of diabetes, rates of GDM are significant Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (sometimes referred to as GDM) is a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy and usually goes away after the baby is born. It is diagnosed when higher than normal blood glucose levels first appear during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is the fastest growing type of diabetes in Australia, affecting thousands of pregnant women. Between 5% and 10% of pregnant women will develop gestational diabetes and this usually occurs around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. All women are tested for gestational diabetes as part of the 24-28 week routine examination with their GP. Women who have one or more of the risk factors are advised to have a diabetes test when pregnancy is confirmed then again at 24 weeks if diabetes was not detected in early pregnancy. While there is no one reason for why women develop gestational diabetes, you are at risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: Are over 25 years of age Have a family history of type 2 diabetes Are overweight Are from an Indigenous Australian or Torres Strait Islander background Are from a Vietnamese, Chinese, middle eastern, Polynesian or Melanesian background Have had gestational diabetes during previous pregnancies Have previously had Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Have previously given birth to a large baby Have a family history of gestational diabetes Most women are diagnosed after special blood tests. A Glucose Challenge Test (GCT) is a screening test where blood is taken for a glucose measurement one hour after a glucose drink. If this test is abnormal then an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) is done. For an OGTT a blood sample is taken before and two hours after the drink. For many people, being diagnosed with gestational diabetes can be upsetting. However, it is important to remember Continue reading >>

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Diabetes and preeclampsia are among two of the reasons why regular prenatal visits are so important. Gestational Diabetes: The Basics Chances are you'll sail through pregnancy without trouble. But even if you're feeling great, you should still seek regular prenatal care because some health problems that could hurt your baby are symptomless. These include gestational diabetes, which raises blood sugar levels during pregnancy, and preeclampsia, a form of high blood pressure. But with early detection and treatment, you can manage these problems and still have a healthy baby. What Is It? Gestational diabetes occurs when pregnancy hormones interfere with the body's ability to use insulin, the hormone that turns blood sugar into energy, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Each year, up to 4 percent of women develop this serious illness in pregnancy. While most women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms, a small number may experience extreme hunger, thirst, or fatigue. How Do I Know If I Have It? Your doctor will probably screen you for gestational diabetes between your 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. If you have certain risk factors (see "Who's at Risk?" below), your doctor may opt to screen you sooner. During your screening, you'll drink a sugary liquid, then take a blood test. If your blood sugar levels appear high, you'll need to take a longer test, during which you'll drink more liquid and your blood sugar will be tested several times to determine whether you have gestational diabetes. What Are the Risks Associated with It? Women who fail to seek treatment for gestational diabetes run the risk of giving birth to big babies (9 pounds or more), since much of the extra sugar in the mother's blood ends up going to the fetus. Larger babies are more likely to suffer b Continue reading >>

Does Gestational Diabetes Run In Families?

Does Gestational Diabetes Run In Families?

Yep! Type-2 Diabetes, of which gestational diabetes is a special sub-set, has a very strong genetic component. In other words, it’s often a family tradition. If you have a sibling, parent, or grandparent who has diabetes you are much more likely to develop it too. Of course, age and weight before becoming pregnant play a large role too. But the bottom line is plenty of women with gestational diabetes have safe pregnancies with healthy happy babies. It’s diabetes that you don’t know about that is dangerous. If you have a family history of diabetes, be sure your medical team keeps a close eye on you and that they test you for it. If you develop gestational diabetes it’s not the end of the world. We have several approved medications that can be used to keep your blood sugar in control while being safe for your baby. You might even be able to control it by changing your diet. Yeah, no one likes to do that, but it is only for a few months! It is difficult to determine whether you are at risk for gestational diabetes if you are related to someone who developed this condition. However, you are at a higher risk for gestational diabetes if an immediate family member, such as a parent or sibling, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. It's important to know your family medical history, so that you can share this history with your doctor before you become pregnant. This will help determine whether you are screened for gestational diabetes. Continue reading >>

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