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Do You Have To Take Insulin At The Same Time Everyday

Exercising Safely With Diabetes

Exercising Safely With Diabetes

Regular and safe physical activity is especially important for people with diabetes. Blood Sugar and Exercise The most common concern people have about exercise and diabetes is how to keep their blood sugar levels from getting too high or too low. Here are some general guidelines to follow: Exercise at the same time every day, if possible. This will help you find out how exercise affects your blood sugar. Check your blood sugar before exercising. If your blood sugar is less than 100 before you start to exercise, eat a carbohydrate snack. If your blood sugar is 250 or higher, don't start exercising until your blood sugar level is under 250. Exercise with a friend who knows that you have diabetes and knows how to help if your blood sugar gets too low. Make sure you have ID with you that lets people know you have diabetes. If you're sick or have an infection, don't exercise until you're feeling better. Being sick affects your blood sugar. Taking insulin or diabetes pills to lower blood sugar Blood sugar can go too low (hypoglycemia) during exercise if you take too much insulin, the insulin is absorbed too quickly, or the insulin peaks during exercise. It can also happen if you take insulin or pills and don't eat enough carbohydrate. Here are some things you can do: If your blood sugar is less than 100 before you exercise, eat at least 30 grams of carbohydrate before you begin. This will help keep your blood sugar level from dropping too low during exercise. Bring a carbohydrate snack with you whenever you exercise in case your blood sugar level drops too low during or right after you exercise. If your exercise will last for more than an hour, check your blood sugar after each hour of exercise. If your blood sugar is 100 or less, you should eat a carbohydrate snack. Check y Continue reading >>

Do Diabetes Medications Have To Be Taken At The Same Time Every Day?

Do Diabetes Medications Have To Be Taken At The Same Time Every Day?

Q: Does it matter if dad takes his diabetes medicine at different times each day? A: The secret of success in treating Diabetes is routine, routine, routine. Consistently consuming meals of a certain number of calories at consistent times, day after day. Also consistency with exercise helps keep the patient from experiencing the peaks and valleys with control of their blood sugar. In that routine, your father should take his medications as consistently as possible. Getting everything off schedule only compounds the challenges on controlling the blood sugar. Oral medications should be used consistently in relation to the meals that are consumed. If meals are missed it usually doesn't mean to miss or skip a dose of medication, but the patient needs to have a plan. This is where patients get into trouble, yo-yo blood sugars. This can really create problems for the other patient. Those who use insulin on a sliding scale would be the only case where there should be changes in dosage times. SS insulin doses are based on the blood sugar levels the patients is experiencing. Also, the Diabetic Scorecard, the A1C lab test evaluates the blood sugar control of the past several months; the target for the senior population is around 7. Different physicians have different targets depending of the overall health of the patient. The higher the number the less control over the past months. That lab result will tell you the impact of your dad taking his medications at different times. Lynn Harrelson is a pharmacist who specializes in medication and prescription management for seniors. She provides health care services and information that help individuals remain independent in their homes, retirement and assisted living facilities. Continue reading >>

Choosing An Injection Site

Choosing An Injection Site

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

The young people we talked to tell us what it is like to inject insulin every day, the problems they've had and how they've coped with them. Where and how to inject Young people are taught by specialist diabetes nurses and doctors how and where to inject. Arms, legs and the stomach are all parts of the body recommended for injection. Most people said that their preferred place was the stomach. But they also said that it's important to vary the place where they inject, over a wide area. They said that injecting in the same place can cause lumps or other changes, called hyperlipotrophy, to develop under the skin. Your healthcare team can teach you how to recognise these changes. Injecting into the areas that have developed this problem is usually completely painless but the insulin may then be absorbed unevenly, which makes blood sugar much harder to control. Some young people who were small children when diagnosed said that they have grown up with doing daily injections and thought it was normal. Other children were scared of needles at first and their parents had to inject them, to begin with. Young people have different opinions as to whether insulin injections hurt or not. Some said that the needles they use are so thin that they don't feel it, but others said it depends on how relaxed and comfortable they are at the time of the injection. Several young people commented that it's much easier and painless to do the injections themselves because they know their own body. Most young people said that it is down to practice and that 'practice makes it perfect'. The people we talked to said that doing their own injections made them feel in control and gave them a feeling of independence. Getting used to injecting everyday It could take a long time to get used to injecting e Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Why injections? Insulin is a lifesaving medicine for people with diabetes. But there is no such thing as an insulin pill—it can only be taken as a shot. However, today's syringes and insulin pens are much easier to use and much less painful than those in the past. Many people say that they feel almost no pain at all when they take an insulin shot. How is insulin taken? There are two ways to give yourself insulin: from vials or with pens. If you are using a vial, you will also need syringes. If you are using a pen, you will also need pen needles. Both the syringes and the pen needles can be thrown away after you use them. It is common to take more than one type of insulin. Mealtime insulin is taken before meals to help manage food-related rises in blood glucose (sugar). Long-acting insulin helps to manage blood glucose throughout the day and needs to be taken at the same time every day. Your health care provider will tell you when to take your insulin and how much to take. How to inject Your diabetes educator or other health care provider will have taught you how to take your shots. Here's a review: Choose your site. Insulin can be injected into the upper arms or upper thighs, the abdomen either above or below your waist, or the buttocks. Avoid scars, moles, and the area around the belly button. Use the same area, but change the spot where you give your shot each time to protect your skin over time and ensure that the insulin is absorbed. Prepare the insulin. Some insulins need to be mixed before you give a shot. Your provider will tell you if you are using this kind. If you use a syringe: Fill the syringe. First, draw air into the syringe equal to the amount of your insulin dose. Push that air into the vial. Then draw up the insulin into the syringe. Check for air bub Continue reading >>

Does It Matter What Time You Take The Long Standing Insulin? As Long As It's Consistent. What Time Do You Guys Take It?

Does It Matter What Time You Take The Long Standing Insulin? As Long As It's Consistent. What Time Do You Guys Take It?

Download helparound app for FREE and ask your own questions Does it matter what time you take the long standing insulin? As long as it's consistent. What time do you guys take it? Does it matter what time you take the long standing insulin? As long as it's consistent. What time do you guys take it? NPH time-release lasts 5-6 hours.. the majority benefit the last hour. Normally, taken morning and dinner time. Are you on both regular and time-release or just one? Are you using a premixed percentage insulin pen? How many times do you test.. morning, lunch, evening(dinner)? Test before going to dleep? I'm a mom supporting a child with type 1 diabetes since 2013. I give my daughter her 'night time' levimer between 7-8 at night Levemir and Lantus can be taken once a day or the dose can be split in half and taken once every 12 hours. It's best if you're only taking it once a day to take it opposite of your "high" time. For example, if you tend to run high in the morning, taking it at night may help. Just make sure you take it at the same time every day. It's nice to see what everyone is doing and what options there may be. Continue reading >>

Timing Is Everything | Pet Diabetes Care

Timing Is Everything | Pet Diabetes Care

A friend recently told me that she always comes up with the perfect comeback. Her problem is that she thinks of it 20 minutes too late. Yep, sometimes timing is everything. When it comes to diabetes care of our pets, timing can make the difference between a well regulated diabetic pet and a “mostly” regulated diabetic pet. Routines may not be exciting, but routines make for a well-regulated diabetic pet! After two plus decades practicing veterinary medicine, I sometimes think I have heard it all. Then a client comes along and proves me wrong. Recently one of my own veterinary clients told me he routinely gave his cat the insulin then waited an hour before feeding his pet. I don’t know where this client got this notion as I had told him what I tell all my clients, to feed and give insulin at the same time every 12 hours. Now, whether one waits to see if Fluffy is eating before giving the injection is another story. For folks who have a pet with a hearty appetite that couldn’t imagine missing a meal, they may give the injection as the pet dives into dinner. A feeding frenzy is definitely a distraction to the quick poke of an insulin needle. For folks who have a finicky eater, they might watch to make sure the pet truly eats before giving the injection. Nonetheless, I would feed the pet essentially at the same time as the injection rather than waiting any length of time. The insulin needs something to work with. If food is not given with the insulin the pet could become hypoglycemic. How about the timing of meals? Does it matter if a pet eats in between insulin injections? Yes. Just as giving insulin without food can cause a low blood glucose reading, giving food without insulin will cause an elevated blood glucose test result. If you give a snack in the middle of Continue reading >>

So You’re Ready

So You’re Ready

Indication BASAGLAR is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. Limitation of Use Important Safety Information Do not take BASAGLAR during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed. Before starting BASAGLAR, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. BASAGLAR should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. The most common side effect of insulin, including BASAGLAR, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life threatening. Signs and symptoms may include dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, slurred speech, shakiness, fast heartbeat, anxiety, irritability, mood change, or hunger. Do NOT dilute or mix BASAGLAR with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. BASAGLAR must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. BASAGLAR may cause serious side effects that can lead to death, such as severe allergic reactions. Get emergency help if you have: Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together w Continue reading >>

Making A Diabetic Meal Plan Work For You

Making A Diabetic Meal Plan Work For You

How a Diabetes Meal Plan Can Help You Knowing how to plan heart healthy meals is important for managing all types of diabetes diets. Food can raise blood sugar levels. The type and amount of foods that are eaten will affect how high and how fast blood sugar levels will rise. It is important to make healthy eating choices about when to eat, what to eat and how much to eat. When should a diabetic eat? Eat your meals and snacks at about the same time each day. By doing this, your blood sugar levels may stay under control. Space your meals 4-5 hours apart. Eat in-between snacks as needed. If you take insulin or diabetes pills, keep the right balance between food and these medicines. You should understand how long your pills or insulin take to work to lower blood glucose levels. Find out when they work the best you plan when to eat. Snacks between meals are very important if you go more than five hours from meal to meal. What should a diabetic eat? Eat about the same size meals and snacks every day. Most people eat a small breakfast, a medium sized lunch and a larger dinner. This forces the body to process most of the day's food at the end of the day. A better idea is to eat all meals that are about the same size. You will be eating balanced meals throughout the day. Make healthy food choices rich in vitamins, minerals, lean protein like white chicken and fiber such as brown rice. The fiber takes longer to break down. Blood sugars rise slower. This will keep blood sugar levels better controlled. It will help your body better process the sugar coming from your food. Do not skip meals. If you take insulin or diabetes pills, do not skip meals. This can cause your blood sugars to drop too low. Skipping one meal could cause you to overeat at the next meal. Even if you do not take Continue reading >>

Guidelines For Insulin Shots For Diabetic Pets

Guidelines For Insulin Shots For Diabetic Pets

I can’t think of a disease that causes more owner anxiety than diabetes. Something about having to give a shot twice a day, every day, to an animal you love is very daunting. Then you do it a couple times and suddenly, it’s a breeze! I’ll try to help you get “breezy” fast! I’ll also answer the common question of “how far apart can I give the insulin?” Insulin is kept in the refrigerator. Some pens made for humans can be left out for periods of time, but for the most part, plan on refrigerating the insulin. If you have a decent drive to the pharmacy or vet office, bring a little cooler to bring the insulin home. It needs to be gently mixed before each dose. Vetsulin, an insulin made specifically for dogs and cats, can be shaken like a polaroid picture. Other insulins need to be gently inverted in a rocking motion, not shaken like orange juice. Your veterinarian will show you how to give shots, and make sure you get some practice with saline solution! Here’s some pointers (hoping to have a video soon!): We generally aim for the back, between the shoulder, but insulin can be given under the skin anywhere! Try not to hit the exact same place over and over. Some owners move it in a little circle on the back, some do a 4-corners approach. Do what works for you. You basically want a spot that has skin you can easily pinch. Pinch the skin with your thumb and middle finger. That leaves your index finger free. If you’re right handed, do this with your left hand. Feel the “tent” of skin that forms from your pinching. That’s where the shot goes. After drawing up the insulin and getting the bubbles out, hold the syringe with your thumb and middle finger, leaving your index finger free to depress the plunger. Insert the needle completely into the skin. You c Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In people with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used with another type of insulin (a short-acting insulin). In people with type 2 diabetes, insulin glargine also may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin glargine is a long-acting, manmade version of human insulin. Insulin glargine works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin glargine comes as a solution (liquid) to inject subcutaneously (under the Continue reading >>

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

Is Mealtime Insulin Right For Me?

Is Mealtime Insulin Right For Me?

Diabetes & Insulin In diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin or use it properly. This causes your blood sugar to go too high. Oral medications, like metformin, may help your body to use insulin more efficiently. Other oral medications can help your body make more insulin. However, these medicines often work for only a few years. When the oral medications stop working, you will need to give yourself background and/or mealtime insulin shots to help control your blood sugar. If you need insulin, it does not mean that you have failed. It is just a part of diabetes. Background insulin can help control your blood sugar when you are not eating. However, it does not cover the carbs that you eat at meals. If the dose of background insulin is raised to cover spikes in blood sugars that happen after you eat, your body will have too much insulin in between your meals and while you sleep. This can cause your blood sugar to go too low. This is called hypoglycemia. If you have high blood sugars after meals, this can cause tiredness, irritability, blurry vision, more frequent urination and thirst. Over time, high blood sugars can damage your feet, hands, and eyes. By adding mealtime insulin you can better match the insulin to what your body would produce if you did not have diabetes. This will help prevent both low and high blood sugars so that you feel better and get less damage from the diabetes. What is Insulin? Natural insulin is made from the pancreas to match what the body needs so your blood sugar stays in a normal range. The pancreas makes some amount of insulin all the time, called background or basal insulin. Background insulin helps to supply fuel to your muscles and controls the glucose that is released from your liver. Every time you eat, the pancreas releases a Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

insulin Basics A collection of resources designed to help you better understand insulin and how it can fit into everyday life. Indication BASAGLAR is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. Limitation of Use Important Safety Information Do not take BASAGLAR during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed. Before starting BASAGLAR, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. BASAGLAR should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. The most common side effect of insulin, including BASAGLAR, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life threatening. Signs and symptoms may include dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, slurred speech, shakiness, fast heartbeat, anxiety, irritability, mood change, or hunger. Do NOT dilute or mix BASAGLAR with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. BASAGLAR must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. BASAGLAR may cause serious side effects that can lead to death, Continue reading >>

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

When diet, exercise, and oral medications aren’t enough to manage type 2 diabetes, it may be time for insulin. The most important aspect of insulin therapy is using it exactly as prescribed. Still, remembering all the little details can be tricky, and certain mistakes are common. By following these dos and don’ts, you can avoid medication mishaps and keep insulin working as it should. DO: Rotate the insertion site (while keeping the body part consistent). “Insulin is absorbed at different speeds depending on where you inject it, so it’s best to consistently use the same part of the body for each of your daily injections,” says Doreen Riccelli, BSN, director of education at Lake Pointe Medical Center in Rowlett, Texas. “For example, don’t inject yourself in the abdomen on Saturday and in the thigh on Sunday,” she says. “If you choose the thigh for your evening injection, then use the thigh for all of your evening injections.” That said, within the specific body area, it’s important to move each injection site at least one finger’s width from the previous injection site to avoid the creation of hard lumps or extra fat deposits, which could change the way insulin is absorbed. DON’T: Store insulin incorrectly. Insulin can generally be stored at room temperature (59 to 86° F), either opened or unopened, for one month. When kept in the refrigerator, unopened bottles last until the expiration date printed on the bottle. Opened bottles stored in the refrigerator should be used or discarded after a month. Never store insulin in direct sunlight, in the freezer, or near heating or air conditioning vents, ovens, or radiators. It should also not be left in a very warm or cold car. Store it in an insulated case if needed. DO: Work closely with your doctor. Continue reading >>

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