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Do Insulin Shots Cause Weight Gain

Not So Fast With The Insulin?

Not So Fast With The Insulin?

I was drawn to this article, because I am pretty sure getting Insulin exogenously is a bad idea for Type 2 types. it sounds logical at first, but I think the author is onto something. I have been injecting insulin for about 13 years. And the result has been, my control of blood sugars is getting further and further out of control, not getting into control. Before I started injecting, before I was diagnosed, really, I had all the symptoms, but I didn't know that they were diabetic symptoms. And somewhat crazy, I through everything away in my house that was not natural, or had ingredients in it that were not natural. Then, I concocted this diet consisting basically of fruits, nuts, berries and vegetables. I got rid of all dairy, and most meats; I did eat chicken breasts and salmon. I eliminated all sugar. Even juice. And I went to the health club daily, and spent 20 minutes in the sauna, 20 minutes on a treadmill walking slowly, and swam 20 minutes gently. Nothing vigorous. Within 4 months, I had lost 60 pounds, looked and felt great, had the energy of a 10 year old, and the sex life of a 16 year old. I am a guy, and at that time I was 41. Then, for various reasons, I gained back the weight, and by age 44 I was officially diagnosed with Type 2 and given insulin immediately because my sugars were so high when I checked into the ER because, I felt like I was dying (no energy). Went through all the learning curve about the disease, tried meds, which did nothing, and pretty much felt depressed with the new diagnosis. I had remembered, after learning what the symptoms were, that I had all these symptoms before, and seemed to cure them all with diet and exercise. It was tough though, because no knowing exactly what helped or didn't help, I tended to vacillate for the next sever Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Is The Trademark Of Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes.

Insulin Resistance Is The Trademark Of Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes.

Insulin resistance causes weight gain and then type 2 diabetes as I’ve said in my book, The New Diabetes Prescription. To be diabetic or pre-diabetic is to have insulin resistance 100% of the time. But what exactly is insulin resistance? How does it lead to weight gain? How does that then lead to diabetes? And how can it be prevented? I’ll answer all that in this 3 part series on the causes of diabetes. Insulin resistance starts with too much insulin. Insulin is excreted by the pancreas after the first bite of food, and later on in boluses, or little squirts, to keep blood sugar stable. Among the three major nutrients, carbohydrates require far more insulin to process than protein or fat. In fact, fat eaten without any carbohydrates barely requires any insulin at all. To summarize, you eat, glucose is processed, and insulin transports that glucose to your cells so they can eat. Insulin resistance requires more insulin than normal to make that whole process work. The amount of insulin needed to process a gram of glucose into your cells is not fixed. It varies from person to person, and even hour to hour! People who need very little insulin to process their food are called insulin sensitive. Insulin sensitivity is increased with exercise, eating healthy, having more muscle, and keeping lean. In contrast, overweight people and type II diabetics have insulin resistance because they may need up to four or more times the amount of insulin of a normal individual to process their food. Insulin resistance is increased through not exercising, eating a diet high in refined sugars and fats, and as a consequence, gaining too much body fat. These actions and subsequent fat gain cause huge surpluses in glucose that must be cleared from the blood by huge surpluses in insulin. “De Continue reading >>

Why Diabetes Causes Weight Gain

Why Diabetes Causes Weight Gain

by Healthoria.com Being diagnosed with diabetes doesn’t guarantee excessive weight gain. There are professional athletes and other fitness professionals with quite normal, and in some cases, incredibly impressive physiques. So it’s not accurate to say everyone with diabetes will definitely have problems with weight gain. You aren’t doomed to instantly gain twenty pounds, but for most people with diabetes managing their weight becomes very challenging. Here’s why many people gain weight. Insulin Resistance Diabetes is a metabolic disease often resulting in high blood sugar due to inadequate production or inefficient use of the insulin hormone. When you consume carbohydrates, and sugar in particular, it will raise your blood sugar levels. Your body releases insulin to draw sugar out of your blood to be used for energy. When you have diabetes, the process isn’t working normally and your blood sugar levels are not being returned to normal. Excessive blood sugar levels, for long periods of time, can cause vision, kidney and nerve problems. It’s important to get your blood sugar back to normal levels to avoid serious long term health complications. Depending on how serious your condition, and whether you’re type 1 or type 2, you may need to use insulin injections to help keep your blood sugar under control. It’s often the introduction of more insulin that results in gaining weight. Related: Best diet to get rid of love handles Why It Can Cause Weight Gain If you’re diabetic it means there’s a disruption in the consumption and use of energy. The process isn’t working efficiently, and your current body weight isn’t normal. Insulin will cause more efficient use of calories If you aren’t producing enough insulin, or you aren’t using it efficiently, it Continue reading >>

What Are The Side Effects Of Insulin Shots?

What Are The Side Effects Of Insulin Shots?

Insulin is at the center of the diabetes problem. In people with type 2 diabetes, the body does not use insulin effectively. The pancreas compensates by overproducing insulin, and in time, it simply cannot keep up with the demands of the body to keep glucose levels down. To provide enough insulin to the body to manage blood glucose levels, many diabetics are advised to take insulin shots. The insulin in these injections is a chemical that is produced artificially to resemble the insulin made in our pancreas. This insulin works just like natural insulin by escorting sugar from our blood into our cells. Type 2 diabetics deal with a condition known as insulin resistance. It is a phenomenon where cells aren’t sensitive to the action of insulin (escorting blood glucose into cells) and hence, do not respond to it. This leads to the accumulation of glucose in the blood and is called hyperglycemia. Supplemental insulin given to Type 2 diabetics helps the body ‘muscle’ sugar out of the bloodstream and into cells. Insulin injections are used to regulate blood sugar differently for the different diabetes-types: For people who have type 1 diabetes – Their bodies cannot make insulin and therefore they aren’t able to regulate the amount of glucose in their bloodstream. For people who have type 2 diabetes – Their bodies aren’t able to produce enough insulin, or use it effectively. The insulin shots are used because the blood sugar cannot be regulated with oral medications alone. They also stop the liver from producing more sugar. Every type of insulin available in a drug store works in this way. They, mainly, differ in two ways – How quickly they begin to work For how long they can regulate blood sugar levels Mechanism of Action Regulating the process in which glucose Continue reading >>

12 Myths About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

12 Myths About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin facts vs. fiction When you hear the word “insulin,” do you picture giant needles (ouch!) or pop culture portrayals of insulin users with low blood sugar (like Julia Roberts losing it in Steel Magnolias)? Either way, most people think of insulin as a difficult, painful, or potentially scary medical treatment. The problem is that if you have type 2 diabetes, you need to know the real deal before you can make an informed choice about whether or not this potentially lifesaving therapy is right for you. Here, we take a look at the facts and fiction about insulin when it comes to treating type 2 diabetes. Diabetics always need insulin Not necessarily. People with type 1 diabetes (about 5% to 10% of diabetics) do need insulin. If you have type 2, which includes 90% to 95% of all people with diabetes, you may not need insulin. Of adults with diabetes, only 14% use insulin, 13% use insulin and oral medication, 57% take oral medication only, and 16% control blood sugar with diet and exercise alone, according to the CDC. The point is to get blood sugar—which can be a highly toxic poison in the body—into the safe zone by any means necessary. Taking insulin means you’ve ‘failed’ “This is a big myth,” says Jill Crandall, MD, professor of clinical medicine and director of the diabetes clinical trial unit at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in the Bronx, N.Y. “Many people who try very hard to adhere to a diet, exercise, and lose weight will still need insulin.” The fact is that type 2 diabetes is a progressive illness, meaning that over time you may need to change what you do to make sure your blood sugar is in a healthy range. Eating right and exercise will always be important, but medication needs can vary. “A large percentage of people with ty Continue reading >>

Myth Vs. Fact: Weight Gain

Myth Vs. Fact: Weight Gain

One concern patients sometimes ask about before starting insulin pump therapy is weight gain. A common myth exists that going on a pump causes one to gain weight. While it is just a myth and using an insulin pump does not cause weight gain, many people taking insulin do gain weight. The question is, why? Potential Causes of Weight Gain Associated with Diabetes Management, Including Insulin Resolution of glycosuria (glucose in the urine): Before diagnosis and those who are not in optimal glucose control, lose calories by spilling glucose in their urine. This occurs when the glucose level gets above 180-200 mg/dL. With better glucose control, this stops and all the calories eaten stay in the body where the excess are stored as fat. Since insulin pump therapy improves glucose control (which is a good thing), glucose (and therefore calories) are no longer lost in the urine and overeating leads to weight gain – just like it does in someone without diabetes. Treating hypoglycemia: If you have an episode of hypoglycemia, you take glucose to correct it. If you have a lot of hypoglycemia, or take more glucose than is actually needed, you can end up ingesting an excess of calories that can cause weight gain. Insulin pump therapy should actually help this. “Defensive eating” because of the fear of hypoglycemia: Some people are so concerned about hypoglycemia that they eat a “little extra” as a preventive measure. This can add extra calories that will add extra pounds. Avoiding Weight Gain While on Insulin Controlling weight gain when on insulin likely requires some lifestyle changes. Here are a few Dos and Don’ts to help you stay on track. Do be sure you understand your nutrition plan. Meet with a Dietitian. Remember you need a team to succeed made up of your health ca Continue reading >>

Weight Gain On Stomach..is It Due To My Diabetes?

Weight Gain On Stomach..is It Due To My Diabetes?

Back to forums hi, i was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when i was 16..in the summer of 2007.I have always been skinny (like the rest of my family) but since having diabetes, i have gained weight around my stomach.Its really getting me down, and i havnt seen anyone about it as i was worried that they would just put it down to be gaining weight.My family noticed it and my dad thinks that i have it stuck in my head that it is my diabetes, my mum is helpful and we are booking a doctors appointment soon.Im just confused because if it was fat..then surely i would be fat everywhere else!and its not like rolls of fat, my belly just looks round?it makes me really self concious.my diabetes is well controlled and i inject 4 times a day, novorapid and levemir at night.It doesnt really ever feel bloated, and i dont suffer from stomach aches with it, its just that its not normal and i really, really want to get to the bottom of it and know whats causing it so i can do something about it!! would be soooo so so grateful for any replys to this, from people with similiar symtoms with diabetes, or just some help or advice as to what it might be and what i can do?? thanks very much! natalie Continue reading >>

Selected Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information

Contraindications Levemir® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir® or any of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Never Share a Levemir® FlexTouch® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Dosage adjustment and monitoring: Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Insulin regimens should be modified cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment of concomitant anti-diabetic treatment. Administration: Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Do not administer subcutaneously via an insulin pump, intramuscularly, or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Selected Important Safety Information Contraindications NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill®Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) Indications and Usage Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) is i Continue reading >>

Insulin Myths And Facts

Insulin Myths And Facts

If you have type 2 diabetes and your A1C is slowly creeping up despite your best efforts, insulin may be the next step in treating your diabetes. Many people struggle with the thought of insulin because of what they have heard about it. Some common myths about insulin and facts that may help you overcome your fears are listed below. Myth: Insulin means I am a failure. Fact: Needing insulin does not mean that you have failed to manage you diabetes well. Because type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease, eventually your pancreas is just not able to keep up with your body's need for insulin—no matter what you've done to manage your diabetes. When other medicines no longer keep your blood glucose on target, insulin is often the next logical step for treating diabetes. Myth: Insulin does not work. Fact: Although many people think of diabetes as a “sugar” problem, actually diabetes is an insulin problem. The insulins used today are very similar to the insulin that the body naturally makes. In fact, insulin is the best way to lower your blood glucose. Myth: Insulin causes complications or death. Fact: The belief that insulin causes complications or death often comes from seeing what happened in the past to family members or friends with diabetes. Although it can be hard to get past your fear, in fact, it is more likely that insulin might have delayed or even prevented these complications if it had been started earlier. Myth: Insulin causes weight gain. Fact: It is true that many patients who begin insulin gain weight. Insulin helps your body use food more efficiently. If this is a concern, ask for a referral to a dietitian before you start insulin. Myth: Insulin injections are painful. Fact: Although no one likes shots, most people are surprised by how little an insulin i Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Insulin-related Weight Gain

How To Avoid Insulin-related Weight Gain

Managing diabetes sometimes requires insulin treatment, which may lead to weight gain. Find out why and learn how to manage your weight while using insulin. When diet, exercise, and oral diabetes medications aren't enough to control diabetes, adding insulin can help get your blood sugar under control. Although insulin is an important part of diabetes treatment, some people may have an issue with weight gain after starting on it. If insulin has been prescribed as part of your treatment plan, you may need to pay extra attention to your weight management efforts in addition to blood sugar management. "Insulin weight gain is a well-known problem and concern for people with type 2 diabetes," says Amber L. Taylor, MD, an endocrinologist who directs the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "This is problematic because weight gain can make managing diabetes more difficult." Why Is Weight Gain an Insulin Side Effect? A study published in the journal Clinical Medicine Insights: Endocrinology and Diabetes focused on 102 people with type 2 diabetes who had recently started taking insulin. After the first year of insulin therapy, both men and women in the study had increased their body weight by about 2.5 percent. The science behind why this happens is clear. When you’re not managing diabetes well, your body can't use the glucose (sugar) from your food for energy. That means the sugar builds up in your blood, which can lead to diabetes complications. You may feel hungry because you’re not getting enough energy, and thirsty because your body is trying to flush all that sugar out of your bloodstream. Here’s what happens when you add insulin: Insulin helps the sugar in your blood to be absorbed by your cells, where it's used and stored for energy. Because you’r Continue reading >>

Why Does Insulin Make You Gain Weight?

Why Does Insulin Make You Gain Weight?

In a healthy person, beta cells in the pancreas secrete a hormone called insulin to help the body use blood sugar or glucose from food. Type 1 diabetics lack the ability to make insulin and Type 2 diabetics are immune to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Insulin shots may help both types of diabetics, but like any other drug, insulin has side effects, including weight gain. Video of the Day Insulin may cause weight gain because it makes your cells more efficient. Untreated diabetics often excrete glucose in their urine. When you start insulin shots, the hormone helps your cells absorb glucose from the bloodstream, so you are theoretically retaining more calories from food. A Side Effect of a Side Effect Insulin often causes hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. To combat the dizziness and fatigue of hypoglycemia, diabetics on insulin have to eat frequent meals and snacks. Weight gain may simply be the result of an increase in calories. Talk to your physician about the type and dose of insulin you are taking if you notice significant weight gain. Your doctor may be able to adjust your medications. A healthy diet and regular physical activity are also an integral part of weight management. Continue reading >>

At Last, A Weight Neutral Insulin?

At Last, A Weight Neutral Insulin?

In the treatment of diabetes, the positive correlation between weight gain and glycaemic control is well known. Inappropriate weight gain has been demonstrated in landmark diabetes studies, with insulin or oral antidiabetic drugs. Weight increase is associated with accelerated deterioration in beta-cell function in type II diabetes, and increases in hypertension and lipid levels in both type I and type II diabetes. Concerns about increasing weight may be a barrier to initiation or to intensification of insulin therapy. Insulin introduction may be delayed in type II diabetes, and patients may under-dose their insulin to avoid gaining weight. Insulin detemir is a new long-acting soluble insulin analogue where protraction is achieved by reversible binding to albumin. As a result, it has consistent absorption and low variability from injection to injection. Studies of insulin detemir in basal-bolus regimens in type I and type II diabetes have shown significantly less weight gain compared with NPH. There is speculation about potential mechanisms for these outcomes and results from ongoing investigations are awaited. The insulin detemir data suggest that weight gain with insulin therapy is not inevitable. The potential therefore exists for improving glycaemic control while maintaining weight stability, resulting in immediate and long-term benefits for patients. As the importance of achieving HbA1c targets is increasingly emphasised, more people with type I diabetes are adopting intensified insulin regimens, and people with type II diabetes are adding insulin to their oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) regimens or relying entirely on insulin. Current ADA guidelines recommend an HbA1c of <7%, with a need to review and change the treatment regimen if values are consistently >8%.1 Howe Continue reading >>

Counseling Patients On How To Avoid Weight Gain From Insulin

Counseling Patients On How To Avoid Weight Gain From Insulin

A lot of people with type 2 diabetes delay going on insulin for as long as possible because they’ve heard horror stories about how much weight it can make them gain (or maybe they just don’t like shots), but people with type 1 don’t have a choice. While it is true that insulin treatment is often associated with weight gain and more frequent bouts of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), the real question is, why? Some theories to explain insulin-induced weight gain are that when using insulin, your blood sugar is (usually) better controlled and you stop losing some of your calories (as glucose in your urine when your blood sugars exceed your urinary threshold) and that you may gain weight from having to eat extra to treat any low blood sugars caused by insulin. If you’re taking oral medications to lower your blood sugar and they are not working, however, insulin may be your main option for better control. A few research studies have looked at whether weight gain is simply a result of eating more when you’re on insulin. One such study found that weight gain was not due to an increase in food intake, but rather that your body may increase its efficiency in using glucose and other fuels when your glycemic control improves — making you store more available energy from the foods you eat as fat (even if you’re eating the same amount as before you went on insulin) (1). So, what can you do to avoid weight gain if you have to take insulin? First of all, you should try to keep your insulin doses as low as possible because the more insulin you take, the greater your potential for weight gain is. The best way to keep your insulin needs in check is to engage in regular physical activity. By way of example, some people with type 2 diabetes who were studied gained weight from Continue reading >>

Weight Gain Taking Victoza Injections?

Weight Gain Taking Victoza Injections?

Guest over a year ago My doctor is thinking about putting me on something called Victoza and it is a injection to be taken every day. But it isn't insulin. Has anyone heard of this medication? I heard that insulin can cause weight gain and I was thinking what if Victoza causes weight gain as well? I really don't want to have to fight weight gain again after I just lost 45 pounds last year. It was a struggle to get it off then to have to have it come back on, I will be so mad. So I would love to hear about any other diabetics who have tried Victoza injections. Did you gain weight with it? Did you gain a lot of weight with Victoza injections? Were you able to lose the weight and how did you do it? Is there any way to keep from gaining the weight in the first place? I am really getting myself worked up thinking about going on this med. I was on birth control pills at one time and I quit taking them because I started gaining so much weight and couldn't get it off. ybanks522310520 over a year ago Victoza injections are available in pen-form so there is no drawing up medication. As one of its benefits, it may help the diabetic patient LOSE weight, not gain weight. So you should not worry about gaining at all. Some of the side effects you do need to be aware of are nausea, headache, diarrhea, and hypoglycemia. It isn't a type of insulin so it has a few side effects insulin doesn't. Nausea is pretty common but it should subside as well as the other side effects in time. It can be used in conjunction with oral diabetic medication. It is never prescribed along with prandial insulin. These injections work by getting the pancreas to secrete more insulin. Victoza resembles the hormone that is in the body called GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1). This hormone is actually produced in th Continue reading >>

Does Injected Insulin Hold Fat In The Stomach?

Does Injected Insulin Hold Fat In The Stomach?

I am 83 years old and have had diabetes for 48 years. I have tried for seven years to lose weight, and I lose it everywhere except my stomach. I've injected insulin in my stomach for 45 years. Is it true that the insulin I inject holds the fat in my stomach? If so, how can I get rid of the stomach fat without moving the injection site to other parts of my body? Continue reading >>

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