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Do Insulin Pens Come With Needles

Insulin Pens: Types, Benefits, And How To Use Them

Insulin Pens: Types, Benefits, And How To Use Them

Insulin pens are used by people with diabetes to inject insulin. The pens include an insulin cartridge, a dial to measure dosage, and a disposable needle. Insulin pens are growing in popularity. They allow insulin to be delivered in a more simple, accurate, and convenient way than the vial and syringe method. Contents of this article: Types of insulin pen There are several different brands and models of insulin pen available. Most fall into two distinct categories: disposable and reusable. A disposable pen: this contains a prefilled insulin cartridge. Once used, the entire pen unit is thrown away. A reusable pen: this contains a replaceable insulin cartridge. Once empty, the cartridge is discarded and a new one put in. A new disposable needle must be used every time insulin is injected. With proper care, reusable insulin pens can last for several years. Choosing an insulin pen The brand, model, and category of pen used will depend on several factors. It is important to discuss this with a doctor before purchase. Some general factors about the pen to consider include: type and brand of insulin available size of the insulin dose it can hold increments by which the dose of insulin can be adjusted material and durability (if reusable) how it indicates remaining insulin levels ability to correct dose levels that are put in wrong size of the numbers on the dose dial level of dexterity required to use the pen Benefits Research has highlighted the benefits of using insulin pens, particularly prefilled disposable pens. People with diabetes are happier using insulin pens than the vial and syringe technique, according to some studies. One reason for this is that insulin pens have many features that make them safe and convenient. For example, greater dose accuracy and autoshield ne Continue reading >>

Get To Know The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Get To Know The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Levemir® Flextouch® Is Ready To Use In Just A Few Steps

Levemir® Flextouch® Is Ready To Use In Just A Few Steps

Levemir® FlexTouch®, a prefilled insulin pen with no push-button extension, requires low force to inject at all doses and is ready to use in just a few steps.a In fact, Levemir® FlexTouch® has up to 77% less injection force than Lantus® SoloSTAR®. From the makers of the world’s #1-selling prefilled insulin pen,b Levemir® FlexTouch® is: Accurate—Accurate dosing from 1 to 80 units Prefilled—Each pen is prefilled with 300 units of Levemir® Discreet—Fits in your pocket, purse, or nightstand On the go—Take it with you almost anywherec aPlease see the Patient Information for complete Instructions For Use. cOnce in use, Levemir® FlexTouch® must be kept at room temperature below 86°F for up to 42 days. Injecting with Levemir® FlexTouch® You may have concerns about using an injectable medicine for type 2 diabetes. But it’s important to realize the positive effect it may have on the management of your diabetes. And once you gain a little practice in giving injections on your own, Levemir® injections will become part of your daily routine. If you were given instructions from your health care provider on how to use Levemir® FlexTouch® and you have read the Instructions for Use in the Patient Information, you may be ready for your first injection. Your health care provider will tell you what dose of Levemir® is right for you and how many times to take it each day. Your dose may be adjusted based on your blood sugar. Please consult your health care provider prior to adjusting your dose. No compatible source was found for this video. Levemir® can be injected in the thigh, abdomen, or upper arm. It’s important to change the injection site within your injection area each time you inject and not inject into the exact same spot each time. Rotating where yo Continue reading >>

Learning About Insulin Pens

Learning About Insulin Pens

An insulin pen is a device for giving insulin shots. It looks like a pen. Inside the pen is a needle and a cartridge filled with insulin. You can set the dose of insulin with a dial on the outside of the pen. You use the pen to give the insulin shot (injection). Both disposable and reusable insulin pens are available. With a disposable pen, a set amount of insulin comes in the pen ready to use. When the insulin is used up, you throw the pen away. You use a new pen the next time you need insulin. With a reusable pen, you don't throw the pen away. Instead, you reload the pen with a pre-measured cartridge of insulin. When the insulin is used up, you insert a new cartridge into the pen. Disposable and reusable pens both need a new needle with each shot. The needles come in different lengths and widths. Shorter needles will prevent injecting into the muscle, especially in children or people who are lean. Thinner-width needles reduce the pricking sensation. Width is measured by gauge. The higher the number, the thinner the needle. Why do some people prefer pens? Most people find that insulin pens are easier to use than a bottle and syringe. Many people feel less pain (or no pain) with the smaller insulin pen needle, compared to a syringe needle. Insulin pens may help you give yourself more accurate doses. When you draw insulin into a syringe, you must carefully measure so that you don't get too much or too little. But with a pen, you set a dial for the amount of insulin you want, and then you push the button. Insulin pens may work better than syringes for people who don't see well or who have problems like arthritis that make it harder to use a syringe. Using an insulin pen draws less attention from others. You can give yourself insulin with fewer people noticing. You don't n Continue reading >>

The Best Insulin Pen Needles The Long And The Short Of It

The Best Insulin Pen Needles The Long And The Short Of It

If you a diabetic, chances are that you have heard of insulin. When pancreas no longer makes enough insulin to control blood glucose, injecting of insulin is necessary. People with type one diabetes need insulin early. People with type two diabetes also require insulin if diet, exercise and oral medication do not bring blood glucose under control. Currently, the only way to get insulin into the body is by injecting it. Most people with diabetes not already using insulin dread the thought of injections. However, the benefits of bringing blood glucose under control make it worth overcoming this fear. The good news is that insulin injections today are quite painless. Technology has advanced. Needles are finer and shorter than ever before, but still deliver insulin effectively. Insulin delivery devices have come a long way since the days of the needle and syringe. Although syringes are still available, most people who inject insulin daily use a pen delivery device. Whether you choose an insulin syringe or pen, the cost is comparable. An insulin pen can be a pre-filled pen, or a re-useable pen that is reloaded with insulin cartridges. Each injection requires a new pen needle (or tip) to be attached to the pen before the injection. After the pen needle has delivered a dose of insulin, it must be safely discarded into an approved sharps container. Another method is to clip the needle off using a safe-clip device. Use each pen needle only once. Reusing a pen needle can cause various problems at the injection site. Problems include lipodystrophy (build-up of lumpy fat tissue), pain, bleeding, bruising, or even having a needle break off under the skin. Pen needles are coated with a lubricant for a smoother insertion into the skin. This lubricant will not be as effective in furthe Continue reading >>

Pen Needles

Pen Needles

If you or someone you know has diabetes, you’re not alone. Millions of Americans are living with it. And of those, about 15% use medicine that’s injected. Vials and syringes used to be the most common way to inject. But today, many injectable diabetes medicines come in prescription pens, also called prefilled pens. Here, we will focus on the needles that are used with those pens. Choosing a pen needle Today's pen needles are designed to fit most prefilled pens. But, there are other things to consider when choosing a pen needle. Talk with your health care provider; together you can decide which needle works best for you. To learn more about Novo Nordisk’s line of needles and to find the pen needle that’s right for you, click here. Today’s needles are shorter and thinner People who have never self-injected may have concerns about doing so and that’s understandable. But pen needles have come a long way from the ones first launched in 1985. Since then, injection comfort has driven needle technology, making the needles used today shorter and thinner than the ones used in the past. Understanding needle size Pen needles come in all different sizes. The size of a needle is indicated by 2 factors—length and gauge (G): Needle length is measured in millimeters. Lengths range anywhere from 12.7 mm to 4 mm, the shortest insulin pen needle currently available Understanding gauge can be a little tricky. The gauge of a needle refers to its thickness. You would think the higher the number, the thicker the needle, but it’s actually the opposite. The higher the number, the thinner the needle is. For example, a 32G needle is thinner than a 27G needle Always use a new needle for each injection You run the risk of infection from reusing needles. The more you reuse a needle, t Continue reading >>

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What is Toujeo®? Prescription Toujeo® is a long-acting insulin used to control blood sugar in adults with diabetes mellitus. • Toujeo® contains 3 times as much insulin in 1 mL as standard insulin (100 Units/mL) • Toujeo® is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis • Toujeo® should not be used in children Important Safety Information for Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL Do not take Toujeo® if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo®. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens even if the needle has been changed. Before starting Toujeo®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Toujeo®. Your treatment with TZDs and Toujeo® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: • Shortness of breath • Swelling of your ankles or feet • Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Toujeo® should be taken at the same time once a day. Test your blood sugar levels daily while using insulin, including Toujeo®. Do not make changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your doctor. Verif Continue reading >>

Common Insulin Pen Errors: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Common Insulin Pen Errors: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Q. I recently switched from using syringes to inject insulin to using an insulin pen, and it seems like I need to inject more insulin with the pen to counter the same blood glucose level. The length of the needle seems to be the same, the pen is primed, and yet the pen injection has less of a blood-glucose-lowering effect. What could be going on here? A. The insulin contained in vials and pens is identical. So if you’re using your pen correctly, there should be no change in the effectiveness of the insulin on your blood glucose levels. It’s not unusual for people to be educated on how to use an insulin pen and to believe they are injecting with proper technique but to make one or more minor mistakes that affect the amount of insulin being injected. I recommend that you make an appointment with your diabetes educator or health-care provider and have that person observe you injecting a dose of insulin to see what, if anything, might be going wrong. Here are a few examples of common errors that can occur when administering insulin with a pen: A person may dial in the correct dose, put the needle into the skin correctly, but instead of pushing the button at the end of the pen to inject the insulin, dial the dose back to zero. This would result in no insulin being injected. Once the dose is dialed, the button has to be pushed in all the way — you should hear a series of clicks as you push — and then the pen must be held against the skin, needle inserted, for 6–10 seconds. Some people know that they need to push the button to deliver the insulin, but they don’t push it hard enough to inject the entire dose. Another common mistake is to fail to leave the needle in place for at least 6 seconds after pushing the button on the pen. If the needle is removed too soon, t Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens

Insulin Pens

Tweet Insulin pens are common in the United Kingdom, and are generally characterised by a different shape and the fact that they use an insulin cartridge as opposed to a vial. Some insulin pens use replaceable cartridges, and others use non-replaceable cartridges and must be disposed of after being used. Most insulin pens use replaceable insulin pen needles, which have become extremely short and thin. The replaceable cartridges for insulin pens come in 3 and 1 ½ ml sizes, although 3 is more common and has become dominant. Prefilled insulin pens are disposed of when the insulin within the cartridge is used up. Prefilled pens are often marketed for type 2 diabetics who need to use insulin. Insulin Pens Browse through our list of insulin pen reviews. You can also buy the insulin pens from the Diabetes Shop. Simply click on an insulin pen name to read the guide. How do I use an insulin pen to treat my diabetes? Using a pen is a relatively easy process. Some pens require gentle shaking before use. Once the cartridge is loaded, screw on a needle and prime the pen to clear air. Then dial in the exact dose that you require to deliver the insulin to the body. What is good about insulin pens as opposed to syringes? Insulin pens are very easy to use. They are great for young diabetics who need to deliver insulin at school. Furthermore, many diabetics find insulin pens almost painless. They are also portable and discreet, as well as not being as time-consuming as syringes. An accurate dose can be pre-set on the dosage dial, which can be useful for diabetes sufferers who also have impaired vision. Why might I not like insulin pens? Insulin pens are not right for 100% of diabetes patients. Insulin in pens and cartridges is generally more expensive than bottled insulin and syringes. Continue reading >>

Selected Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information

Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch® Pen Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Changes in insulin may affect glycemic control. These changes should be made cautiously and under medical supervision. Adjustments in concomitant oral anti-diabetic treatment may be needed Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Tresiba®, and may be life-threatening Tresiba® (insulin degludec injection) is indicated to improve glycemic control in patients 1 year of age and older with diabetes mellitus. Tresiba® is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis or for pediatric patients requiring less than 5 units of Tresiba®. Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch® Pen Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Changes in insulin may affect glycemic control. These changes should be made cautiously and under medical supervision. Adjustments in concomitant oral anti-diabetic treatment may be needed Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Tresiba®, and may be life-threatening. Increase monitoring with changes to: insulin dose, co-administered glucose lowering medications, meal pattern, physical activity; and in patients with hypoglycemia unawareness or renal or hepatic impairment Accidental mix-ups betwe Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen

Insulin Pen

Using insulin pens with their cartridges can be very convenient. As an alternative to insulin in vial form and syringes, they can give you confidence, or help if you have visual or dexterity impairments[1]. They are less prone to dosage error, though a pen is not accurate when dosage is 3 units or less. They can be a big help if you are new to diabetes and a bit unsure about things. Pens are the predominant insulin delivery system in most of the world, except the United States, where syringes and insulin vials still dominate. See also injecting insulin. Insulin pens come in 2 basic styles: prefilled which you discard after the insulin is used, or refillable. Refillable pens (Like the Novopen Junior[2]) are much like fountain pens; insulin cartridges are inserted and changed when empty. Disposable pens (like the Levemir FlexPen[3]) are cheaper but also less accurate -- the plunger mechanism on the disposable pens is a bit flimsy, and can give inaccurate doses by half a unit or so. You can use either type with a syringe, with some precautions as below. Before you decide to use a pen or not, you must first determine if the insulin you are using comes in one. Lente, Ultralente, and PZI insulins do not, as they are not able to be properly resuspended for injecting in pen form. In Europe, things may be the other way round -- many insulins come only in pen form there, and if you wish to use syringes for their greater precision, you must use them with pen prefill cartridges. The initial outlay for a refillable pen may cost more (around $40), and cartridges or disposable pens cost more per mL than vials. On the other hand, in the case where the insulin is expensive and expires quickly, as with Lantus, you may find yourself throwing away a lot of expired insulin -- it can then be Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen Safety

Insulin Pen Safety

Insulin pens have become a popular way for diabetics to give themselves insulin. Insulin pens are available for multiple insulin types. However, as with any technology, pens can be misused leading to medication errors and inaccurate administration of insulin. Although an insulin pen is easy to use, certain precautions must be taken to assure proper use. Below is a list of safety tips to keep in mind when using an insulin pen: 1. Do not share your insulin pen with anyone: Insulin pens should never be used for more than one person. Using insulin pens on more than one person puts people at risk for infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis viruses and HIV, which causes AIDS, the agency warns. Infection can occur even if an insulin pen's needle is changed. We are aware of this happening in hospitals, where, for example, a nurse may not realize the risk. Pen needles are changed in between patients but the very same pen is used for multiple patients! This is dangerous because even if the needle is changed, it's still possible for insulin in the pen to become contaminated. Then, when subsequent patients are injected, there's a danger of passing along harmful bacterial or virus. 2. Do not withdraw insulin from an insulin pen cartridge Using insulin pens as "mini" insulin vials, by drawing up insulin into an insulin syringe, can lead to inaccurate dose measurement the next time the insulin pen is used for dose delivery. The reason for this is related to air entering the pen unintentionally, interfering with the proper mechanics of the pen. 3. Do not leave an open needle attached to an insulin pen Leaving an insulin needle attached to an insulin pen can lead to unintentional air entering into the insulin pen. If unintentional air enters into the insulin pen, it can c Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens

Insulin Pens

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is an insulin pen? An insulin pen is a device used to inject insulin. The pen contains a cartridge of insulin. The pen may be reusable or disposable. You may need a different pen for each type of insulin you use. How do I get the insulin ready to use? Check the label and color of the insulin. Check that you have the correct type and strength of insulin. Insulin pens are available as U100 and U500 strengths. Also check the expiration date on the label. Use a new cartridge or pen if the expiration date has passed. Short or rapid-acting insulin should be clear, colorless, and free of particles or clumps. Use a new cartridge or pen if the insulin does not look right. Follow the pen manufacturer's instructions for inserting a new cartridge into a reusable pen. Mix cloudy insulin. Gently roll the pen back and forth between the palms of your hands. Repeat this 10 times. Do not shake the pen. This can make the insulin clump together. Next, gently tip the pen up and down 10 times. Do not use the insulin if there are clumps in it after you mix it. How do I get the pen ready to use? Remove a new pen from the refrigerator 30 minutes before you use it. Insulin should be injected at room temperature. Wash your hands. Use soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub. This will help decrease your risk for an infection. Remove the cap from the pen. Wipe the needle attachment area with an alcohol swab. Attach a needle to the pen. Remove the tab from the needle. Do not remove the outer cap on the needle. Push the needle straight onto the pen. Turn the needle clockwise until you cannot turn it more. Make sure the needle is straight. Remove the needle caps. Remove the outer cap and save. Remove the inner cap and throw it away. Remove air from the pen. Air may caus Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen Overview

Insulin Pen Overview

Insulin Pen Overview An insulin pen (or just "pen") is an insulin delivery system that generally looks like a large pen, uses an insulin cartridge rather than a vial, and uses disposable needles. Pens are the predominant insulin delivery system in most of the world, except the United States, where syringes and insulin vials still dominate. Pens are made by Novo Nordisk, Eli Lilly, Disetronic, and Owen Mumford. Disetronic makes pens for other companies, including Aventis. Some pens use replaceable insulin cartridges, and some pens use a non-replaceable cartridge and are disposed of after use. All pens use replaceable needles. Most pens use special pen needles (see discussion below), which can be extremely short and thin. The Disetronic pen, however, uses the same syringe as their DTron insulin pump, which has a traditional syringe leuer lock needle. Pens With Replaceable Cartridges Pens with replaceable cartridges are made by Novo Nordisk, Owen Mumford, and Disetronic. BD used to make pens, including the BD Pen Mini, but they are no longer making pens. Insulin cartridges for pens come in 3.0 ml and 1.5 ml sizes, with 3.0 being the predominant size. The 1.5 ml size is being phased out and availability may be limited. Insulin cartridges are made by Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk, and Aventis. Prefilled Pens Pens that come with a prefilled insulin cartridge are thrown away when the insulin is used up. Prefilled pens are sold by insulin makers Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk, and Aventis. Lilly only sells prefilled pens which come with a variety of Lilly insulins, including Humalog, Regular, NPH, and various mixes, including Humalog mixes. Novo Nordisk sells both prefilled pens and pens that take replaceable insulin cartridges with NovoLog and other Novo Nordisk insulins. Aventis sells pre Continue reading >>

Using Novolog® Flexpen®

Using Novolog® Flexpen®

Here is a quick guide to NovoLog® dosing using NovoLog® FlexPen®. Please read the full Instructions For Use that came with your FlexPen® carefully before using it. To see FlexPen® in action, watch the video below. FlexPen® Demo Video (7:05 min) This video shows you how to use your NovoLog® FlexPen®. NovoLog® FlexPen® should not be used by people who are blind or have severe visual problems without the help of a person who has good eyesight and who is trained to use NovoLog® FlexPen® the right way. Wash your hands. Check the label to make sure that you are using the right type of insulin. This is especially important if you take more than 1 type of insulin Pull off the pen cap. Wipe the rubber stopper with an alcohol swab Remove the protective tab from the needle and screw it onto your FlexPen® tightly. It is important that the needle is placed on straight Never place a disposable needle on your FlexPen® until you are ready to take your injection Pull off the big outer needle cap and then pull off the inner needle cap. Throw away the inner needle cap right away Always use a new needle for each injection Be careful not to bend or damage the needle before use To reduce the risk of needle stick, never put the inner needle cap back on the needle Small amounts of air may collect in the cartridge during normal use. To avoid injecting air and ensure proper dosing: Turn the dose selector to 2 units Hold your FlexPen® with the needle pointing up, and tap the cartridge gently a few times, which moves the air bubbles to the top Press the push-button all the way in until the dose selector is back to 0. A drop of insulin should appear at the tip of the needle If no drop appears, change the needle and repeat. If you still do not see a drop of insulin after 6 tries, do n Continue reading >>

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