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Do I Have To Take Insulin For Type 2 Diabetes?

Your Weight And Diabetes

Your Weight And Diabetes

Diabetes is a group of disorders characterized by chronic high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to the body's failure to produce any or enough insulin to regulate high glucose levels. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, which often occurs in children or adolescents, is caused by the body's inability to make insulin or type 2 diabetes, which occurs as a result of the body's inability to react properly to insulin (insulin resistance). Type 2 diabetes is more prevalent than type 1 diabetes and is therefore seen in roughly 90% of all diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes is predominantly diagnosed after the age of forty, however, it is now being found in all age ranges, including children and adolescents. The impact of diabetes goes beyond chronic hyperglycemia. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness (diabetic retinopathy), end stage kidney diseases (diabetic nephropathy) and non-traumatic lower extremity amputations (diabetic neuropathy) in working-age adults. People with diabetes are also two to four times more likely to experience cardiovascular complications and strokes. Diabetes and its related complications result in an estimated 200,000+ deaths each year, making diabetes one of the major causes of mortality in the U.S. In 2012, the NIH reported an estimated 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) living with diabetes. Of these, an estimated 8.1 million persons were unaware that they had the disease. How does my weight relate to type 2 diabetes? There are many risk factors for type 2 diabetes such as age, race, pregnancy, stress, certain medications, genetics or family history, high cholesterol and obesity. However, the single best predictor of type 2 diabetes is overweight or obesity. Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes a Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

It is widely believed that those with Type 2 diabetes may eventually need insulin if they have diabetes for long enough. However, only about 20-30 percent of people with Type 2 diabetes end up needing insulin injections. In this article, we will explore whether it is possible to manage your diabetes without insulin. If so, how can one do so and when they may eventually need insulin if other treatments do not work out? 1 Type 1 Diabetes disclaimer This article is not for people with Type 1 diabetes because it is imperative that people with Type 1 diabetes require insulin every day without question. A person with Type 1 diabetes produces very little, or no insulin. Without insulin, you cannot convert food into usable energy. Simply put, without insulin, a person with Type 1 diabetes cannot survive. 2 When Robert contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, he was concerned that one day he would have to take insulin shots for his Type 2 diabetes. He had heard a few of his friends with diabetes at church talking about how they had to take insulin injections. Robert was “afraid of needles,” and the thought of giving himself a shot scared him. Is Robert going to need to start taking insulin, or is there any way he can avoid it at this point? If he avoids it, what effects would this have on his health? Will he develop long term complications of diabetes if he doesn’t start giving himself shots of insulin? I suggest also reading these: At TheDiabetesCouncil, we decided to take a look at this particular question in depth, for Robert and for others with diabetes who might benefit from reading this information. Insulin isn’t the “bad guy.” Naturally, the fear of giving oneself an injection or “shot,” can increase anxiety and stress. But what if I told you that once you get past t Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Treatment Could Eliminate Need For Insulin Injections

New Diabetes Treatment Could Eliminate Need For Insulin Injections

A cell-based diabetes treatment has been developed by scientists who say it could eliminate the need for those with the condition to inject insulin. The therapy involves a capsule of genetically engineered cells implanted under the skin that automatically release insulin as required. Diabetic mice that were treated with the cells were found to have normal blood sugar levels for several weeks. Scientists said they hope to obtain a clinical trial licence to test the technology in patients within two years. If successful, the treatment would be relevant for all type 1 diabetes patients, as well as those cases of type 2 diabetes that require insulin injections. Martin Fussenegger, who led the research at the ETH university in Basel, said: “By 2040, every tenth human on the planet will suffer from some kind of diabetes, that’s dramatic. We should be able to do a lot better than people measuring their glucose.” Fussenegger said that, if confirmed as safe and effective in humans, diabetes patients could be given an implant that would need to be replaced three times a year rather than injections, which do not perfectly control blood sugar levels, leading to long-term complications including eye, nerve and heart damage. In Britain, about 400,000 people have type 1 diabetes and three million have type 2 diabetes, about 10% of whom need to inject insulin to control the condition. Type 1 diabetes normally begins in childhood and is an autoimmune disease in which the body kills off all its pancreatic beta cells. The cells respond to the body’s fluctuating glucose levels by releasing insulin, which regulates blood sugar. Without beta cells, patients need to monitor glucose and inject insulin as required – typically several times each day. Previously, scientists have attempt Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Taking Insulin When You Don't Need It

Side Effects Of Taking Insulin When You Don't Need It

Insulin-dependent diabetics take insulin injections because their pancreas no longer produces insulin. Insulin helps cells absorb glucose, the body’s main energy source, from the blood. All Type 1 diabetics, formerly called juvenile diabetics, and some Type 2 diabetics, formerly called adult-onset diabetics, need insulin because their bodies no longer produce enough of the hormone. Without insulin to remove glucose from the blood, blood glucose levels rise, a condition called hyperglycemia. Taking too much insulin or taking insulin when your body already makes enough removes too much glucose from the blood, a condition called hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Video of the Day All cells require glucose to function. When you eat, carbohydrates in the food break down in the intestines into glucose. The blood absorbs the glucose. When this happens, your blood glucose levels rise. In response to the increase in blood sugar, the pancreas releases insulin. Insulin facilitates a cell’s ability to remove glucose from the blood and utilize it for energy. If your body has already released enough insulin and you take more, too much glucose is removed from your blood and you become hypoglycemic. Taking an overdose of short-acting or intermediate-acting insulin is more dangerous than taking too much long-acting insulin, eMedTV explains. Taking insulin when you don’t need it causes symptoms such as sweating, shaking, headache, irritability, nervousness, anxiety, weakness, dizziness, hunger, tremors, nausea, and difficulty concentrating or thinking. For diabetics, the treatment for hypoglycemia is to eat something containing quickly absorbed glucose, such as candy or special glucose tablets. If you have a hypoglycemic reaction and take glucose, follow up with a snack containing b Continue reading >>

Insulin Therapy

Insulin Therapy

Why do I need to take insulin? When you digest food, your body changes most of the food you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells of your body and be used as energy. When you have diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use it properly, so the glucose builds up in your blood instead of moving into the cells. Too much glucose in the blood can lead to serious health problems. All people who have type 1 diabetes and some people who have type 2 diabetes need to take insulin to help control their blood sugar levels. The goal of taking insulin is to keep your blood sugar level in a normal range as much as possible so you’ll stay healthy. Insulin can’t be taken by mouth. It is usually taken with injections (shots). It can also be taken with an insulin pen or an insulin pump. How often will I need to take insulin? You and your doctor will develop a schedule that is right for you. Most people who have diabetes and take insulin need at least 2 insulin shots a day for good blood sugar control. Some people need 3 or 4 shots a day. Do I need to monitor my blood sugar level? Yes. Monitoring and controlling your blood sugar is key to preventing the complications of diabetes. If you don’t already monitor your blood sugar level, you will need to learn how. Checking your blood sugar involves pricking your finger to get a small drop of blood that you put on a test strip. You can read the results yourself or insert the strip into a machine called an electronic glucose meter. The results will tell you whether or not your blood sugar is in a healthy range. Your doctor will give you additional information about monitoring your blood sugar. When should I take insulin? You and your doctor should discuss when and how you Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Weight Gain From Insulin

Type 2 Diabetes And Weight Gain From Insulin

It's Your Health This article was produced in collaboration with the Public Health Agency of Canada. On this page: Insulin is a medicine that may be used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Treatment with insulin may lead to weight gain but this gain can be prevented by making healthy life style choices. Insulin is a hormone normally produced by the pancreas. It helps to keep blood sugar (glucose) at normal levels by moving glucose from the blood into the cells of your body. The cells then use glucose for the energy your body needs to function. Normally, the pancreas secretes insulin when you eat. But if your body doesn't make insulin or cannot use it properly, glucose accumulates in the blood and the cells don't get enough sugar for energy. If this happens, your doctor may decide you need to be treated with insulin, in addition to diet, exercise and/or medicines, depending on your type of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, (once called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent) diabetes, is usually diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults and cannot currently be prevented. Those with type 1 diabetes must take insulin because their bodies do not make it. Type 2 diabetes, (once called adult-onset diabetes or non-insulin-dependent diabetes) is the most common form of diabetes. It starts when the body doesn't use insulin as it should. There are several options available to manage the disease. Some people may require only lifestyle modifications, including healthy eating and increased physical activity. Others may need to use oral diabetes medications (for example, metformin) and/or insulin, in addition to making lifestyle changes. You and your doctor should decide which option is the best for you. Gestational Diabetes is a condition where the body does not properly use insu Continue reading >>

Treating Psychological Insulin Resistance In Type 2 Diabetes

Treating Psychological Insulin Resistance In Type 2 Diabetes

Highlights • Psychological insulin resistance (PIR) has been described for 2 decades. • Interventions to treat PIR have not been well described. • In our study, 28.4% had high PIR and 61.2% had a moderate degree of PIR. • PIR was treated with 4 intervention strategies by certified diabetes educators. • Strategies included teaching, demonstrations, return demonstrations, and managing expectations. Abstract The phenomenon of psychological insulin resistance (PIR) has been well documented for two decades, but interventions to treat PIR have not been well described. The aim of this study was to describe interventions used to treat psychological insulin resistance by certified diabetes educators (CDE’s). A secondary data analysis study using empirical data from a trial (N = 234) that included four CDEs providing counseling for psychological insulin resistance. Participants not currently using insulin completed the 10-item Barriers to Insulin Therapy measure. The four CDE interventionists documented their approach to addressing participants’ barriers to taking insulin using a standard form. Recommendations were collated and summarized. Strong PIR was shown by 28.4% of participants reporting that they “would not start insulin” and a moderate degree of PIR was shown by 61.2% who said they “would be upset, but would start insulin.” The CDE’s treated PIR with four primary interventions: 1) teaching and providing explanations, 2) demonstrations and sharing examples of success using insulin therapy, 3) return demonstrations, and 4) addressing feelings and positively managing expectations. This is the first study to describe in some detail potentially effective patient management strategies for PIR. A randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of PIR in Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes can cause problems during pregnancy for women and their developing babies. Poor control of diabetes during pregnancy increases the chances for birth defects and other problems for the pregnancy. It can also cause serious complications for the woman. Proper health care before and during pregnancy can help prevent birth defects and other health problems. About Diabetes Diabetes is a condition in which the body cannot use the sugars and starches (carbohydrates) it takes in as food to make energy. The body either makes no insulin or too little insulin or cannot use the insulin it makes to change those sugars and starches into energy. As a result, extra sugar builds up in the blood. The three most common types of diabetes are: Type 1 The pancreas makes no insulin or so little insulin that the body can’t use blood sugar for energy. Type 1 diabetes must be controlled with daily insulin. Type 2 The body either makes too little insulin or can’t use the insulin it makes to use blood sugar for energy. Sometimes type 2 diabetes can be controlled through eating a proper diet and exercising regularly. Many people with type 2 diabetes have to take diabetes pills, insulin, or both. Gestational This is a type of diabetes that is first seen in a pregnant woman who did not have diabetes before she was pregnant. Often gestational diabetes can be controlled through eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly. Sometimes a woman with gestational diabetes must also take insulin. For most women with gestational diabetes, the diabetes goes away soon after delivery. When it does not go away, the diabetes is called type 2 diabetes. Even if the diabetes does go away after the baby is born, half of all women who had gestational diabetes develop type 2 diabetes later. It’s important Continue reading >>

Thinking Of Starting Insulin

Thinking Of Starting Insulin

All people with type 1 diabetes and many with type 2 diabetes need insulin to manage blood glucose (sugar) levels. What is important is to live well with diabetes. Sometimes, people feel scared, nervous, or guilty about having to start insulin therapy, and that’s okay. Taking insulin to help manage your diabetes may be hard to understand at first. You might be scared of taking injections. What is important to remember is that using insulin can help you to manage your glucose (sugar) levels which can prevent complications related to diabetes. Your diabetes health-care team will work with you to ensure that you understand how using insulin fits into your diabetes management. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas to control the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. This can lead to serious health problems, such as blindness, heart disease, kidney problems, amputation, nerve damage, and erectile dysfunction. Looking forward to good health If this seems like a lot to learn, don’t worry – your diabetes health-care team will work with you to ensure that you understand how to use insulin effectively. What happens in diabetes? Type 1 diabetes The pancreas is no longer able to make insulin. As a result, people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes will need to start on insulin immediately and take it for life. Insulin is given either with multiple daily injections using insulin pens or syringes or by using an insulin pump. Type 2 diabetes The pancreas no longer produces enough insulin or the body is not able to use its own insulin effectively. If you have type 2 diabetes, you may be able to keep your blood glucose (sugar) levels in your target range through healthy eating, physical activity, and by t Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Insulin

Diabetes & Insulin

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, you are certainly not alone. Diabetes affects more than 29 million people in the United States and approximately 415 million people worldwide. Although diabetes is a very common diagnosis, managing your disease is a very personal experience. Learning about your diabetes and treatment options such as insulin can help. Diabetes is a disease where your blood sugar can be higher than normal. When you have diabetes: Your pancreas makes little, not enough, or no insulin, or Your body prevents the insulin you do make from working correctly As a result, sugar can’t get into your cells, so it stays in your blood. This causes your blood sugar to stay too high (also called hyperglycemia). Both high and low blood sugar can result in serious complications. That’s why controlling your blood sugar is an essential part of managing your diabetes. Follow your health care provider's recommendation about the best time of day to check your blood sugar. Once you get a little practice checking your blood sugar, it will become part of your routine. No compatible source was found for this video. What are the symptoms of diabetes? If you have diabetes, you may have some or all of these symptoms: Increased thirst and hunger Frequent urination Weight loss Blurry vision Feeling tired You may also have problems with: Scrapes or bruises healing slower than usual Tingling or numbness in the limbs Or you may have no symptoms at all. What are the types of diabetes? Your health care provider may have spoken with you about your type of diabetes, but you may not know about the other types. Some of the types of diabetes are: Type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin. People with this type of diabetes must take insulin every day. Ty Continue reading >>

“do I Need Insulin For My Type 2 Diabetes?”

“do I Need Insulin For My Type 2 Diabetes?”

After a type 2 diabetes diagnosis, there are four treatment options that you can discuss with your doctor: Diet & Exercise: Learning how to reduce the carbohydrates and overall calories in your diet along with regular exercise for weight loss. Losing weight helps improve insulin sensitivity (gaining weight promotes insulin resistance). For some people with type 2 diabetes, these changes can be enough to achieve healthier blood sugar levels. Oral Medications: There are a variety of oral medications (pills) for improving blood sugars in people with type 2 diabetes. They each are classified by their make-up and the impact on the body. While some pills increase natural insulin production, other pills are designed to decrease the amount of glycogen (which is eventually converted to glucose) secreted by your liver. The 6 primary classifications of pills are, Sulfonylureas, Meglitinides, Biguanides, Thiazolidinediones, Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, and DPP-4 inhibitors. You may know some of the brand names, like Metformin, Avandia, or Januvia. Your diabetes healthcare team will help you determine the best fit for you. Injectable Medications: Known well as “Byetta” or “Symlin,” these medications are injected, but are very different than insulin. Symlin is known for helping with reducing blood sugars but also for promoting weight loss. Byetta works by increasing your own natural insulin production. Insulin: Lastly, there is insulin, which is administered with a syringe, pen, or pump. While most doctors will take you through the options above before prescribing insulin, this option might be exactly what you need. Insulin is the most powerful hormone in the body for regulating blood sugars, and as a person with type 2 diabetes, you either don’t produce enough to meet you Continue reading >>

Barriers To Initiating Insulin In Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Development Of A New Patient Education Tool To Address Myths, Misconceptions And Clinical Realities

Barriers To Initiating Insulin In Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Development Of A New Patient Education Tool To Address Myths, Misconceptions And Clinical Realities

, Volume 7, Issue4 , pp 437450 | Cite as Barriers to Initiating Insulin in Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Development of a New Patient Education Tool to Address Myths, Misconceptions and Clinical Realities The purpose of this study was to identify patient beliefs as well as clinical realities about insulin that may be barriers to type 2 diabetes patients initiating insulin treatment when recommended by their physician. This information was then used to develop a clinically relevant, cross-culturally valid patient education tool with the goal of providing unbiased, medically informative statements addressing these barriers. Thirteen focus groups were conducted in five countries (Germany, Sweden, The Netherlands, UK, and USA) to collect qualitative data on attitudes about insulin therapy from type 2 diabetes patients aged 18 or older whose physician had recommended initiating insulin treatment in the past 6months (n=87). Additionally, a panel of four clinical experts was interviewed to ascertain obstacles they experience in initiating insulin with their patients. On the basis of the interview data, the ten questions that asked about the most important barriers were generated. The clinical expert panel then generated clinically accurate and unbiased responses addressing these concerns, and the educational tool Questions about Starting Insulin: Information on the Myths, Misconceptions and Clinical Realities about Insulin was drafted. The draft tool was pilot tested in a group of patients and finalized. Patient misconceptions, as well as some clinical realities, about insulin treatment and diabetes can influence the decision to initiate insulin treatment and ultimately impact disease management. The educational tool developed through this study was designed to help patients who Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

Treatment for diabetes aims to keep your blood glucose levels as normal as possible and control your symptoms to prevent health problems developing later in life. If you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your GP will be able to explain your condition in detail and help you understand your treatment. They'll also closely monitor your condition to identify any health problems that may occur. If there are any problems, you may be referred to a hospital-based diabetes care team. Making lifestyle changes If you're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you'll need to look after your health very carefully for the rest of your life. This may seem daunting, but your diabetes care team will be able to give you support and advice about all aspects of your treatment. After being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, or if you're at risk of developing the condition, the first step is to look at your diet and lifestyle and make any necessary changes. Three major areas that you'll need to look closely at are: You may be able to keep your blood glucose at a safe and healthy level without the need for other types of treatment. Lifestyle changes Diet Increasing the amount of fibre in your diet and reducing your sugar and fat intake, particularly saturated fat, can help prevent type 2 diabetes, as well as manage the condition if you already have it. You should: increase your consumption of high-fibre foods, such as wholegrain bread and cereals, beans and lentils, and fruit and vegetables choose foods that are low in fat – replace butter, ghee and coconut oil with low-fat spreads and vegetable oil choose skimmed and semi-skimmed milk, and low-fat yoghurts eat fish and lean meat rather than fatty or processed meat, such as sausages and burgers grill, bake, poach or steam food instead of frying Continue reading >>

Starting On Insulin In Type 2 Diabetes

Starting On Insulin In Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet If type 2 diabetes develops, your body’s ability to produce sufficient insulin may decrease and it may be appropriate to take insulin injections to control your diabetes. Some people may be apprehensive about switching onto insulin injections. Benefits of insulin injections Insulin is a stronger medication for lowering blood glucose levels and can help with the following aspects: Decrease the effects of symptoms of high blood sugar, such as fatigue and frequent need to urinate Reduce the risk of developing diabetic complications Decrease pressure on the pancreas to produce insulin Disadvantages of being on insulin injections Raises the risk of hypoglycemia Can promote weight gain Some people may be uncomfortable about injecting Could affect employment if you drive for a living The needles used for insulin injections are very slim and many people who start injections are surprised by how painless the needles are. How many injections will I need to take each day? A number of different injection regimes are available, ranging from one injection a day to multiple injections a day. Your health team will be able to help you to choose an injection regime that best fits in with your lifestyle. Learning to inject Your health team should instruct you on injection technique to ensure insulin is delivered correctly. Watch a video on how to inject insulin Blood glucose testing People starting insulin therapy may need to regularly test their blood sugar levels to monitor the effect that insulin is having and to help prevent low glucose levels (hypoglycemia) from happening. Watch our video on how to perform a blood glucose test Insulin therapy and hypoglycemia Insulin is a powerful medication for lowering blood glucose levels and can cause blood glucose levels to go too low if Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin And Why Do Some Diabetics Need To Take It?

What Is Insulin And Why Do Some Diabetics Need To Take It?

Question: What is insulin and why do some diabetics need to take it? Answer: Insulin is a hormone. It's made by certain cells in the pancreas, which are called the beta cells of the pancreas, and the beta cells from the pancreas are part of these little islets called the Islets of Langerhans. That's where insulin normally comes from, and in type 2 diabetes there is always some insulin coming out from those beta cells; in type 1 diabetes, you tend to lose the beta cells and make no insulin. Since 1921 or so, though, insulin has been available as a pharmacologic approach, so you can take insulin by injection, and you can replace what's not being made in the pancreas. Who needs insulin? Well, it really is two situations. First of all, in type 1 diabetes, insulin is always necessary because the beta cells in the pancreas are not making any insulin. So, people with type 1 or juvenile onset diabetes always need insulin injections. In type 2 diabetes, you may also need insulin if your pancreas has sort of worn out to the point that it's not making anywhere near enough insulin, and you do need insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes often can be treated by different pills that might improve the insulin release by the pancreas or improve the response of the body to insulin, but eventually even type 2 diabetes may simply not be making, the pancreas may not be making enough insulin, and the person may need insulin by injection. Next: What Causes Diabetes? Previous: What Is Gestational Diabetes And Can It Hurt My Baby? Continue reading >>

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