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Did Your Gestational Diabetes Go Away

Gestational Diabetes Going Away?

Gestational Diabetes Going Away?

Come and join us on Facebook and Twitter . The BellyBelly forums are now closed. Join the official BellyBelly Facebook community for support and advice, and visit the BellyBelly website for awesome information! I was diagnosed with GD at 32 weeks gestation and am currently 38 weeks. I have controlled this with diet and exercise. My original knowledge of the condition was that it goes away after the baby is born. However, I have recently heard (briefly) that the condition does not go away after birth. I do understand that you have a higher chance of getting Type 2 Diabetes within 10 years, however I thought your diabetes went away as soon as the baby is born. I am very nervous about having to accept this condition as permanent. Can someone lighten me on this situation? Thankyou. No, it does go away. I have been told this by the GD clinic, OBS & Midwife that once the placenta is removed that it goes away. You have to be tested approx. 6 weeks after giving birth as you have a higher chance of getting type 2 diabetes. They then test you annually for type 2 diabetes after that. I have had GD with all 3 of my pregnancies and apparently i have it already now,, I was borderline with my first but was on insulin with baby 2 and 3.. My diabetes went away the day I gave birth.. I didn't even need to have my bood sugars tested after 24 hrs They test you for 24hrs after the birth.. I just recently found out I was pregnant again and a blood test showed my sugar levels are already on the rise. The Dr isn't sure if I have developed diabetes or if Gd has started early. I think it is just starting early as i had no symptoms of it till the past 2 weeks.. Anyways I think the risk if developing Type 2 later in life is higher but if you exercise and watch your diet the risk is lower.. I was Continue reading >>

Did Your Gd Go Away??

Did Your Gd Go Away??

Ladies who have had babies .... Did your GD go away or stay?? I hate this it's depressing me and I'm so worried I'm gonna be like it forever , eating rabbit food and testing .... Or that I had type 2 and it wasn't found so just wondering what happened to you when your babies were born? Xxx Hi there. Just came back for a peek today. Baby is 12 weeks. The first few days after birth I felt the exact same as pregnancy with gd. Couldn t eat carb/sugar heavy hospital food. But now am breast feeding and eating lots of carbs and sugars and feeling ok again:-) One blood sugar test came back as normal but have to have glucose tolerance test early jan. So in other words you should be able to have your cake and eat it when pregnancy is behind you! Ps I only put on 4lbs during pregnancy. (After giving birth weight). It doesnt last forever. Midwives said most people ok after pregnancy even those taking insulin injections :-) That's very reassuring ... Can't wait to eat my cake lol only 7 days to induction ! Congrats on your new baby xxx Good luck with induction. Again it will be all over before you know it and you ll have your precious bundle in your arms:-) Wishing everyone here all the best! Its just our greedy little babues taking all our insulin:-) they give it all back on the way out the door:-) After all the health scares I couldn't believe how healthy and perfect our baby was when he came out. I had my baby in august. Had blood test at 6 weeks. All fine. Will have to lose weight to prevent diabetes type two but for now. Its all :-) I had my repeat GTT when baby was 8 weeks and everything was back to normal. My consultant advised to have a yearly blood test to check for type-2, but right now everything is fine. The only thing is that I can't eat really sweet things any more as Continue reading >>

When Does Gestational Diabetes Go Away?

When Does Gestational Diabetes Go Away?

Started by Mum2TwoDSs, Oct 12 2012 08:18 PM When does gestational diabetes go away after birth? I was so hungry i ate all my dinner after my baby's birth, when I did my test 2hrs later it came back to be 13! Almost passed out. I thought it would go away when the placenta is out. Am I wrong? I was getting high readings for 2 days after I had my baby, but they returned to normal by day 3 for me. ETA- I have known women where it returned to normal within a few hours, and have also known some where it took a few weeks for them. Every person is different. Edited by bakesgirls, 12 October 2012 - 08:27 PM. Mine took a couple of days to go down too. I think it generally goes away about 24 hours after the birth. I didn't continue to have finger prixks afterwards ... So no idea, but yes, the doctors told me it would leave as soon as the baby was born. Hope it settles soon, OP. It may not go away at all, that's whyyou are supposed to have a follow up GTT 6 weeks later. I didn't finger prick anymore after having DD, but i did do the test 6 weeks later and it was normal. As PP have said it is different for everyone but normally 24-48 hrs you will be having normal BS. You will be at higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes so you may find that some doctors will repeat a BS at the 6 week check up. QUOTE (soontobegran @ 13/10/2012, 12:54 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}> As PP have said it is different for everyone but normally 24-48 hrs you will be having normal BS. You will be at higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes so you may find that some doctors will repeat a BS at the 6 week check up. It's really important to do the GTT 6 weeks after birth in case you already had undiagnosed Type II at the time of getting pregnant. You're also supposed to do the GTT every 2 years after that, because of the Continue reading >>

Did Your Gd Go Away Immediately After Giving Birth?

Did Your Gd Go Away Immediately After Giving Birth?

Did your GD go away immediately after giving birth? For the women who've already had their babies, did it go away right after? Could you go back to eating normally right away? I burn through breakfast so fast, I can't wait to get ba k to my oatmeal and bananas! I'm always hungry I've heard other women on the board where it did go away right away, but not for me. I'm currently 12 days post partum and I'm still registering in prediabetic range. Hoping it will still go away. Fyi i was diet controlled and slim, and I'm already back to my prebaby weight Sorry to hear that. Hopefully it's just the hormones and you will be back to normal soon. I am also quite petite, was underweight before pregnancy, so I just can't even imagine having diabetes after the baby. I was shocked that I have GD to begin with. I guess time will tell, good luck and good job getting to your prepregnancy weight so quickly! I did with my first! My A1C was great and didn't have any issues. I have GD again but this time it's been a lot harder and I'm on more meds. Doc said he wouldn't be surprised if I stayed diabetic after this one. I guess we will see. Mine went away immediately and I was on a butt load of insulin, due to pre-existing PCOS and insulin resistance. I've been introducing carbs more gradually tho. I had a carb heavy meal soon after delivery and the sudden shift made me sick. Mine went away after my first GD pregnancy in 2007, but I was diet-controlled that time. This time, I developed it at the same point in the pregnancy (around week 26), but it was much worse--I was on Glyburide and Metformin, and I couldn't eat more than about 100 g of carbs per day by the end, even with the medication. I'm currently 19 days postpartum, and I'm in the prediabetic/early diabetic range still. It was improv Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - What Happened After Birth?

Gestational Diabetes - What Happened After Birth?

I have diet controlled GD but coming to the end of my pregnancy now. I've been told they'll repeat the GTT six weeks post partum but till then I can eat "normally" (not go mad obviously, but I can have a chocolate bar and some pasta!!) as soon as the placenta is out. Although I am diet controlled now, my GTT results, done at 32 weeks, were really high (13.8 after 2 hours) and am v worried that I will fail the GTT at six weeks. Did anyone else have GD and if so what were your experiences post birth? Did your blood sugars return to normal soon after birth? TIA! It is likely that the numbers will go back to normal within a couple of days of the birth, BUT, and it's a big but... Your numbers were fairly high at 32 weeks. You have a very high risk of developing diabetes within the next 5 years (something you may not even be advised about!), I think it's between 25-50% depending on all your risk factors. BUT, and again, it's a big but... You don't have to just sit back and wait for that to happen, Change your diet (reduce your carbohydrate intake they way you have during your pregnancy, permanently) and exercise (even a brisk walk 3or 4 times a week) a little more and that could prevent it ever happening. I had gd in one preg 18 years ago (subsequent pregs were ok as I adapted my diet as soon as I was pregnant, now I'm a bit older, I low carb and check blood sugar every couple of months with my own monitor as a few years ago my fasting blood sugar had started to rise to the highest end of "normal". I think it's fairly scandalous that women with GD are not fully informed about the risks of "carrying on as normal"... My sister recently had GD and was given the same rubbish advice I was 18 years ago "carry on as normal, your blood sugar is fine"(with a mention that she might be Continue reading >>

Prenatal Monitoring And Care

Prenatal Monitoring And Care

The Lasting Impact of Gestational Diabetes on Mothers & Children: Q&A with Judith Fradkin, MD, NIDDK, National Institutes of Health Dr. Judith E. Fradkin is director of the Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. In her 30-year career at NIDDK, Dr. Fradkin has created or directed a diverse array of high-impact clinical and basic research programs. Dr. Fradkin graduated from Harvard College, earned her M.D. from the University of California at San Francisco in 1975, and completed an internship and residency at Harvard’s Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. In addition to her oversight of major biomedical research programs, she serves as an endocrinology consultant at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, MD. In 2003 Dr. Fradkin received the American Medical Association’s Dr. Nathan Davis Award for outstanding public service in the advancement of public health. Q: What is gestational diabetes? A: Gestational diabetes is diabetes that is found for the first time when a woman is pregnant. Diabetes means that your blood glucose (also called blood sugar) is too high. You and your baby use glucose for energy. But too much glucose in your blood can be harmful and when you are pregnant, too much glucose is not good for you or your baby. Changing hormones and weight gain are part of a healthy pregnancy. Both changes make it harder for your body’s insulin to do its job. When that happens, glucose levels may increase in your blood, leading to gestational diabetes. Pregnant women are tested for gestational diabetes between weeks 24 and 28 of their pregnancy using a simple blood test. Gestational diabetes occurs more frequently among women with a Continue reading >>

What Happens After Baby Is Born With Gestational Diabetes?

What Happens After Baby Is Born With Gestational Diabetes?

What happens after baby is born when you've had gestational diabetes will depend on your type of birth and your birth plans. Babies born to mothers with gestational diabetes are at risk of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar levels) and so it is recommended that babies have their blood sugar levels checked following birth in addition to the usual newborn checks. What to expect after baby is born - checks on babies born to diabetic mothers Neonatal or newborn hypoglycaemia Newborn babies of diabetic mothers when there has been poor diabetic control in pregnancy will often struggle with their own blood sugar levels after birth. This is due to the baby overproducing their own insulin whilst growing in the uterus to help process the excess sugars passed from the mothers bloodstream. These babies may have high insulin levels persisting in the first few days after birth which can result in hypoglycaemia as they are no longer receiving excess sugar from the mothers bloodstream and they may struggle to regulate their own insulin production to normal levels. Babies of mothers who have had reasonably good blood glucose control may still suffer with low blood sugar levels after birth too and so it is recommended that all babies born to diabetic mothers (including gestational diabetes) have their blood sugar levels checked. Testing baby for hypoglycaemia following birth with gestational diabetes In the majority of hospitals, newborns born to diabetic mothers are routinely monitored for hypoglycaemia. Each hospital is different as to how they monitor the blood sugar levels, but the procedure is the same. A midwife or nurse will heel prick the baby to obtain enough blood to be tested on a blood glucose test monitor, the same as we use to monitor our own blood sugar levels throughout the p Continue reading >>

Can Gestational Diabetes Go Away Before Delivery?

Can Gestational Diabetes Go Away Before Delivery?

Can Gestational Diabetes Go Away Before Delivery? Gestational diabetes is a unique type of diabetes mellitus since it is only found during pregnancy. But although it doesnt affect all pregnancies, it seems that the number of cases is increasing. The good news, it can be managed. Even lifestyle measures are usually enough to cope with. But can it go away before delivery? Experts dont know why some pregnant women experience gestational diabetes, while others dont. The exact cause of the problem is also not fully known. But the elevated levels of pregnancy hormones especially in the late stages of pregnancy made and released by the placenta are often to blame. Insulin is essential hormone released by the pancreas. It plays a key role to help regulate and reduce the high amounts of glucose (sugar) in the circulation (bloodstream). If there something goes awry with it, the natural mechanism of your body to regulate your normal blood sugar level is also affected. In diabetes, the pancreas cannot make adequate insulin that the body needs or the body cannot use insulin effectively even though there is adequate insulin released by the pancreas. This usually occurs in type-2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes mellitus. In the worst scenario such as in type-1 diabetes, the pancreas is very poor in making insulin or sometime it cannot make insulin at all. Therefore type-1 is also often called as insulin-dependent diabetes, because patients usually need to take insulin every day to help control their blood sugar levels. As the baby develops and grows, the mothers body should make more insulin to keep the blood sugar at normal levels. Even in the late of pregnancy, the amount of insulin required can be 2-3 times greater than usual. Pregnancy hormones are required to help the Continue reading >>

Will My Gestational Diabetes Go Away?

Will My Gestational Diabetes Go Away?

I have been told I have gestational diabetes and that it should resolve after the birth. Is there any chance that it wont go away? Counsellor, Diabetes Educator, Psychotherapist, Registered Nurse Carolien Koreneff is a Somatic (body-oriented) psychotherapist, Health Coach, Counsellor as well as a Credentialed Diabetes Educator with over 20 years experience. She currently sees ... View Profile As Helen already reported, in most cases the blood glucose levels will return to normal as soon as the placenta is born, so the diabetes would disappear literally minutes after the baby is born. You are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life and hence it is recommended that you have another glucose tolerance test 3 months after the delivery and if normal, every 1-2 years afterwards. Your GP can help you organise these OGTTs. There is a 50% chance of developing diabetes in the next 10 years and so lifestyle factors such as living an active lifestyle with mostly healthy food choices are important. Feel free to contact me if you like more information. For now, enjoy your pregnancy and your new born baby, making sure to take some time out for yourself from time to time so you can do some exercise, even if it is just taking the little one for a walk around the block. All the little bits help, except when you eat your children's left overs, they just hinder as they tend to go straight to the hips/thighs in the form of fat (if you get my drift). So keep watching your portion sizes and enjoy life! Arlene is a registered practising dietitian, with a private practice in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, and has built a strong business over the last ... View Profile In most cases of true Gestational Diabetes it is gone as soon as the placenta is expelled. With Gestational Di Continue reading >>

Did Your Gestational Diabetes Go Away After Giving Birth?

Did Your Gestational Diabetes Go Away After Giving Birth?

Did your gestational diabetes go away after giving birth?     Subject: Did your gestational diabetes go away after giving birth? I have just been diagnosed with gestational diabetes and am feeling really overwhelmed. The doctors seem kind of flippant over what this means long-term. I asked if it should go away and they said probably, but it could be Type 2 diabetes revealing itself. I am relatively young (30) and was slightly overweight prior to pregnancy, but not obese. For those of you who had GD, were you able to manage it with diet and exercise and did it go away after you gave birth?     Subject: Did your gestational diabetes go away after giving birth? It puts you at greater risk for t2 later on. If you get back to a normal (not the high end of normal) and stay there you should be ok.     Subject: Did your gestational diabetes go away after giving birth? Most women with gd control their blood sugar with diet and exercise, some need medication, oral or insulin, especially women with elevated fbg. I have seen different studies of different populations that have found women with gd have rates of diabetes 10 years later between 20-90%. Usually T2, but in some populations, also T1. It's something to think about later, OP. For now, find out which foods are better or worse for your blood sugar, follow your doctor's advice, and focus on your pregnancy and your baby. GD went away after each of my two pregnancies, but I'm now pre-diabetic (which is typical). +1 GD makes you predisposed to type 2 later in life. Just watch your weight, OP, and exercise. However, if you are Asian or Hispanic (not spanish), it might be even harder to control type 2. I'm Asian, and we are more predisposed to this even if one is not overweight. Something about our genes. And no, it's no Continue reading >>

Life After Gestational Diabetes

Life After Gestational Diabetes

In most cases Gestational Diabetes will go away after pregnancy, but a woman who has had Gestational Diabetes is at higher risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes at a later stage. With some lifestyle changes it is possible to reduce this risk. This video tells you what to expect after the birth of the baby. Also see below: Will Gestational Diabetes go away after I've had my baby? Can I do anything to reduce the risks? Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Care After Childbirth

Gestational Diabetes Care After Childbirth

Some women will continue to have trouble with their blood sugar after giving birth, so it's important to get your blood sugar tested at six to eight weeks postpartum. Getting at least 30 minutes of exercise every day can lower your risk for future health problems, so develop a workout plan - and stick to it. If you were diagnosed with gestational diabetes, you were probably relieved to learn that 90 percent of the time, gestational diabetes goes away after you give birth. But there are still some important issues and risks you need to be aware of. The first few days, weeks, and months after delivery can be a time when you are at risk for both emotional and physical problems. Being aware of the risks and knowing what you can do about them can help. Typically, your blood sugar will be checked several times before you are discharged from the hospital after giving birth, so that you can be sure your gestational diabetes has resolved. "Medical follow-up for all women who have had gestational diabetes is very important. In 2 to 3 percent of women, diabetes continues after delivery. All women should have their glucose checked at between six and eight weeks," advises Robert O. Atlas, MD, chairman of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "Emotionally, the first several months after giving birth can be stressful for many new mothers. Depression after childbirth peaks at three to four months. We can't say that gestational diabetes causes postpartum depression, but studies indicate that the risks may be higher for these women," warns Linda Chaudron, MD, a psychiatrist at University of Rochester Medical Center in New York. What Are the Risks After Gestational Diabetes? Some women will continue to have trouble with blood sugar after giving Continue reading >>

Fairly Certain My Gestational Diabetes Didn't Go Away

Fairly Certain My Gestational Diabetes Didn't Go Away

Before I lost my weight I was borderline Type II. I only had GD with dd. After I had her I had my 6 week check and I still had borderline results and my doc said he would diagnose me if I hd another test high like that. I didn't get tested again until 3 weeks ago with this pg and I am diabetic yet, but pretty sure I will get GD again this pregnancy later so it is possible to have a high blood sugar after birth but not be Type II, but it is possible you could have been before you got pg or borderline type II and not know it before, and that would be why it wouldn't go away. Momma to many precious childrenwhoarethe loves of my life! Thanks ladies I have my test tomorrow.. I still am getting the cold sweats and after I eat anything really carb packed I'm getting the weird feeling/taste in my mouth so thats kinda whats tipping me off its still the diabetes... I only gained 16lbs during my pregnancy so I don't have much to loose maybe 5 lbs to be pre pregnancy weight so i must have had it before I got preg and didn't know it cause I didn't have any symptoms but by the end of my pregnancy I could barely eat anything at all! We will just have to wait and see huh! Time will tell.. i had this test after ds and I didn't do well in it. But it didn't say I had diabetes, it said boarder line. They told me to come back in 6 months to see if my pancreas had healed from the pg (GD can damage the pancreas which leads to diabetes). But that was a year ago, I haven't had time to go back and do the 2 hour test again. I plan on doing it sometimes before summer though. But I have been tracking mysugar levelsin the morning every now and then and they have been perfect. My doc told me at the time it can take up to 6 months after having a baby for everything to be ok. 7 Sway Factors: Diet, pH, Continue reading >>

When Is Gestational Diabetes Diagnosed And Does It Go Away After Birth?

When Is Gestational Diabetes Diagnosed And Does It Go Away After Birth?

When is gestational diabetes diagnosed and does it go away after birth? Screening for gestational diabetes is performed during pregnancy. Left untreated, gestational diabetes increases the risk of complications to both the mother and her unborn child. Usually, blood sugar levels return to normal within six weeks of childbirth. However, women who have had gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. American Diabetes Association: Recently Diagnosed. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NDIC): Diabetes Overview. National Diabetes Education Program: About Diabetes and Pre-diabetes. Saaddine, J. , 2006. Annals ofInternal Medicine Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on March 25, 2017 American Diabetes Association: Recently Diagnosed. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NDIC): Diabetes Overview. National Diabetes Education Program: About Diabetes and Pre-diabetes. Saaddine, J. , 2006. Annals ofInternal Medicine Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on March 25, 2017 When should you call a doctor or podiatrist about your diabetes-related skin issues? THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911. This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information. Continue reading >>

What Happens After Birth With Gestational Diabetes?

What Happens After Birth With Gestational Diabetes?

The healthcare team will usually stop any diabetes-related medication as soon as you have given birth. However, you or your baby will receive extra monitoring, and perhaps extra care, as a result of the gestational diabetes. Your baby after the birth Gestational diabetes can directly affect your baby’s blood glucose levels. That means that he could be born with low blood glucose. This could lead to serious consequences if it is not treated, but your team will be aware of these risks and will know what to do. He may also have jaundice (which is usually harmless if treated) and may also have increased risk of breathing difficulties. You will be encouraged to feed your baby within half an hour after birth and then every two-to-three hours until his blood glucose levels stabilise. Two-to-four hours after the birth, the healthcare team will test his blood glucose level. They will do this by pricking his heel to get a drop of blood for testing. Your baby will not enjoy this, but try not to let it upset you. The test is done to keep your baby safe. If your baby’s blood glucose remains low, he might need some extra help to increase his blood glucose levels, such as being put on a drip or being tube fed. He may need to spend some time being monitored or treated in the neonatal unit – especially if there are extra complications. However the hospital will try to keep him in the ward with you wherever this is possible. "I was an emotional wreck afterwards for a whole week, crying all the time. I didn't like seeing my baby with tubes in him and he had jaundice as well so we weren't allowed to go home. But now, he's fabulous; constantly crawling around, he's a really busy baby!" Aisha, mum of one You after the birth Your blood glucose should be tested before you leave the hospi Continue reading >>

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