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Diabetic Without Insulin What Happens

Treating Type 2 Diabetes Without Insulin

Treating Type 2 Diabetes Without Insulin

When you think of diabetes medication, you probably think of insulin. In many cases, treatment for type 2 diabetes may never actually involve insulin replacement. Although type 2 diabetes is caused by a failure of the body to make or properly use its own insulin, a hormone needed for blood sugar control, there are many treatment plans for type 2 diabetes without insulin replacement. “You could say that everybody with type 2 diabetes will eventually need insulin if they lived long enough," explains Kevin M. Pantalone, DO, an endocrinologist and diabetes expert at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. "But in reality, only about 20 to 30 percent of people with type 2 diabetes ever need it. We have lots of other options we can use first." First-Line Options: Diet, Exercise, and Metformin “Diet and exercise alone were once the standard diabetes therapies for early type 2 diabetes, but that has changed over the past few years," Dr. Pantalone says. "The American Diabetes Association (ADA) now recommends starting the diabetes medication metformin early. Today, only a minority of people are prescribed diet and exercise alone for diabetes." According to a review of type 2 diabetes management plans published in the journal Clinical Diabetes in 2012, metformin should be used as initial therapy for type 2 diabetes because it can lower A1C by 1 to 2 percent. A1C is a blood test that measures your average blood sugar over the past two to three months. The goal is to have an A1C score of 7 percent or less. Doctors use this measurement to decide on treatment options from lifestyle changes and oral medications to insulin replacement. Here’s more on the first-line treatments for diabetes: A diabetes diet. A healthy diet is important for controlling blood sugar, maintaining a healthy weight Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

It is widely believed that those with Type 2 diabetes may eventually need insulin if they have diabetes for long enough. However, only about 20-30 percent of people with Type 2 diabetes end up needing insulin injections. In this article, we will explore whether it is possible to manage your diabetes without insulin. If so, how can one do so and when they may eventually need insulin if other treatments do not work out? 1 Type 1 Diabetes disclaimer This article is not for people with Type 1 diabetes because it is imperative that people with Type 1 diabetes require insulin every day without question. A person with Type 1 diabetes produces very little, or no insulin. Without insulin, you cannot convert food into usable energy. Simply put, without insulin, a person with Type 1 diabetes cannot survive. 2 When Robert contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, he was concerned that one day he would have to take insulin shots for his Type 2 diabetes. He had heard a few of his friends with diabetes at church talking about how they had to take insulin injections. Robert was “afraid of needles,” and the thought of giving himself a shot scared him. Is Robert going to need to start taking insulin, or is there any way he can avoid it at this point? If he avoids it, what effects would this have on his health? Will he develop long term complications of diabetes if he doesn’t start giving himself shots of insulin? I suggest also reading these: At TheDiabetesCouncil, we decided to take a look at this particular question in depth, for Robert and for others with diabetes who might benefit from reading this information. Insulin isn’t the “bad guy.” Naturally, the fear of giving oneself an injection or “shot,” can increase anxiety and stress. But what if I told you that once you get past t Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Our Lifespan Sans Insulin?

Ask D'mine: Our Lifespan Sans Insulin?

Got questions about navigating life with diabetes? Ask D'Mine! Our weekly advice column, that is — hosted by veteran type 1,diabetes author and educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil offers some thoughts on that universal question: "How long can I really go without insulin?" Please take a read; his findings might surprise you and even bust a myth or two. But as a precautionary reminder: this topic would fall into the category of "Don't try this at home"! {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Jake, type 1 from Minneapolis, writes: I've had diabetes for 18 years and I had someone ask me a question the other day that I didn't really have an answer to. The question was how long I would be able to survive without any insulin. I told them 3-4 days, but I don't know if this is true. Any info from a cinnamon whiskey swizzling T1? [email protected] D'Mine answers: If Tom Hanks' character in Castaway had been one of us, he would've never lived long enough to go half-crazy and end up talking to a volleyball named Wilson. OK, so that's a mixed blessing. But I guess the lesson there is: don't get washed up on a deserted island if you can avoid it. To be honest, like you, I had always pegged my zero-insulin survival time in the "couple of days" zone; but once I got to thinking about your question I realized that I didn't know how I knew that, where I learned it, or if it was even correct at all. So I set out to do some fact-checking. Now, as background for you sugar-normals, type 2s, and type 3s—in type 1s like Jake and me, if we run out of insulin hyperglycemia sets in. That leads to diabetic ketoacidosis (known as DKA by its friends), which then (untreated) leads to death. This is old news. But how fast is the process, really? Well, there are a number of variables, Continue reading >>

You And Your Hormones

You And Your Hormones

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ located behind the stomach called the pancreas. Here, insulin is released into the bloodstream by specialised cells called beta cells found in areas of the pancreas called islets of langerhans (the term insulin comes from the Latin insula meaning island). Insulin can also be given as a medicine for patients with diabetes because they do not make enough of their own. It is usually given in the form of an injection. Insulin is released from the pancreas into the bloodstream. It is a hormone essential for us to live and has many effects on the whole body, mainly in controlling how the body uses carbohydrate and fat found in food. Insulin allows cells in the muscles, liver and fat (adipose tissue) to take up sugar (glucose) that has been absorbed into the bloodstream from food. This provides energy to the cells. This glucose can also be converted into fat to provide energy when glucose levels are too low. In addition, insulin has several other metabolic effects (such as stopping the breakdown of protein and fat). How is insulin controlled? When we eat food, glucose is absorbed from our gut into the bloodstream. This rise in blood glucose causes insulin to be released from the pancreas. Proteins in food and other hormones produced by the gut in response to food also stimulate insulin release. However, once the blood glucose levels return to normal, insulin release slows down. In addition, hormones released in times of acute stress, such as adrenaline, stop the release of insulin, leading to higher blood glucose levels. The release of insulin is tightly regulated in healthy people in order to balance food intake and the metabolic needs of the body. Insulin works in tandem with glucagon, another hormone produced by the pan Continue reading >>

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

Swallowing pills, checking your blood sugar all the time, or sticking yourself with needles full of insulin probably doesn't sound like your idea of a good time. But taking steps to keep your diabetes under control is your best shot at preventing a slew of frightening complications. If you don't take care of yourself, "diabetes complications typically start within 5 years; within 10 to 15 years, the majority of patients will progress to have multiple health issues," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Fortunately, eating a nutritious diet, exercising, and taking your medication may not only stop complications from progressing, but can also reverse them, she says. Need motivation to stick to your treatment plan? Here's what can happen when you slack off. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops producing insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar; with type 2 diabetes, your body can't properly use the insulin you do produce. In turn, your HDL (or "good") cholesterol lowers, and your levels of harmful blood fats called triglycerides rise. Insulin resistance also contributes to hardened, narrow arteries, which in turn increases your blood pressure. As a result, about 70% of people with either type of diabetes also have hypertension—a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and trouble with thinking and memory. (Add these 13 power foods to your diet to help lower blood pressure naturally.) Failing to control high blood pressure and high cholesterol, either with diet and exercise alone or by adding medications, accelerates the rate at which all your other complications progress, says Robert Gabbay, MD, PhD, chief medical officer at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. More than 4 million people with diabetes have some degree of retinopathy, or dam Continue reading >>

How Long Could We Last Without Insulin?

How Long Could We Last Without Insulin?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I as thinking, dangerous for me know lol, How long could we stay alive if all insulin ran out, due to war or a disaster? Please let me know your views on this. Thanks. Historically speaking, patients were placed on low cal diets, iv saline, and some lasted 1-2 years, those were new diabetics. They would all die from shock, dehydration, DKA, or when body weight dropped by 60 %. This was 1870-1920 before the discovery of insulin. Depressing question but with pre-existing Diabetes, I'd say not long, one to two weeks with no IV fluid in a so called disaster scenario. I wonder about that too sometimes. When I had better insurance I used to try to save aside some of my supplies each time I ordered, and I actually had some stores of strips and some syringes and insulin....but insurance and prescriptions changed, and now I have to be careful to have enough of everything to last. I hope I'm never in that situation, because I'm afraid Trev is probably right. Good question, I guess we do not think about it enough. It can never happen, right? OK, I have "safe up" about 6 weeks of supplies in the last 15 month since on insulin and the pump. That is from my monthly supplies that I do not use up a full bottle of insulin or an entire box of infusion set. That is my life line if we are in an emergency situation. Background Info == I am a T2 and become insulin dependent some years ago. I can not get my a1c down with oral meds. Finally I get my doctor to agree to further testing to confirm my pancreas is going out. Since I am on insulin, I had disconnect myself twice from the pump for an extended period of time Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Severe hypoglycemia, or diabetic shock, is a serious health risk for anyone with diabetes. Also called insulin reaction, as a consequence of too much insulin, it can occur anytime there is an imbalance between the insulin in your system, the amount of food you eat, or your level of physical activity. It can even happen while you are doing all you think you can do to manage your diabetes. The symptoms of diabetic shock may seem mild at first. But they should not be ignored. If it isn't treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that causes you to faint, requiring immediate medical attention. Diabetic shock can also lead to a coma and death. It's important that not only you, but your family and others around you, learn to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know what to do about them. It could save your life. Hypoglycemia is a low level of blood sugar. The cells in your body use sugar from carbohydrates for energy. Insulin, which normally is made in the pancreas, is necessary for sugar to enter the cells. It helps keep the levels of sugar in the blood from getting too high. It's important to maintain the proper level of sugar in your blood. Levels that are too high can cause severe dehydration, which can be life threatening. Over time, excess sugar in the body does serious damage to organs such as your heart, eyes, and nervous system. Ordinarily, the production of insulin is regulated inside your body so that you naturally have the amount of insulin you need to help control the level of sugar. But if your body doesn't make its own insulin or if it can't effectively use the insulin it does produce, you need to inject insulin as a medicine or take another medication that will increase the amount of insulin your body does make. So if you need to me Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin

Imagine life without insulin or pills, or being able to dramatically reduce your dosages. A pipe dream? For the great majority of Type 2 diabetics who come to the Pritikin Longevity Center, it’s exactly what happens. Doris Drew is one stunning example. Fifteen years ago, the software programmer from Wichita, Kansas, suffered from diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, and obesity. Her blood sugar was alarmingly high. “My mother died from complications related to diabetes. I saw myself going through the same agony she endured, and I was frightened.” So Doris came to the Pritikin Longevity Center. Today, she’s off all diabetic medications, she’s lost–and kept off–130 pounds, her blood pressure is normal, and her blood sugar readings indicate that “she’s essentially a nondiabetic,” her physician proudly announces. “She’s in state-of-the-art control.” Her life is in state-of-the-art control, too. “I like to think of the Pritikin Program as my own personal hobby. I love the food, and I’m always on the go–walking, strength training, ballroom dancing. The healthier I’ve become, the more hopeful and rewarding my life is.” Thousands of people have graduated from the Pritikin Longevity Center managing diabetes without insulin or pills. Indeed, for many of our graduates, glucose is lowered to the point where they’re no longer even defined as having diabetes. Long-term follow-up has shown that those alumni who continued to follow the Pritikin Program were able to stay off medications and still maintain healthy glucose levels. By eating well, exercising, and losing weight, they, like Doris, are living healthy, vigorous new lives. Take life to the next level, and be all that you can be. That's what a vacation at Pritikin is all about. Live bet Continue reading >>

T1: What Happens If I Don't Take My Insulin?

T1: What Happens If I Don't Take My Insulin?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community T1: What Happens If I Don't Take My Insulin? I've recently stopped having insulin during the day. I only have it at night, before my meal in the evening. I only do it to try and lose some weight because since being diagnosed I have put on more weight than I was before the diagnosis. I spoke to a diabetes doctor and he said that my weight should go back to what it was after the diagnosis, but I was 9st 1lb 2 months before getting diagnosed. I am now 10st and I hate it. I thought that if I dont take my insulin I would lose weight. I emailed my diabetes nurse about this and she said "have a healthy diet" which I do, everyone can vouch for it in my family, I hardly have any junk food and when I do it is only on a Saturday as a "cheat day" which is what I was told that I am allowed to have. I don't want to go back into hospital or anything, I'm not doing anything wrong. I know they told me that I could be hospitalized again, but that was when I told them that I had stopped taking it full stop. Now I am only taking it at night time. Just curious to know what happens if I only take my insulin and my background insulin at night? What you are doing is not taking your life saving medication in order to avoid putting on weight. You say you are not doing anything wrong and I'm sorry you feel like you have to say that, but try to think about what you would say if someone you loved told you "I'm not taking the medicine I need to stay alive because I don't want to put on weight". I'm sure you would be really worried about them, you would want them to explain what they were doing to their diabetic nurse so they could get help to stop such risky behaviour. There is a Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes - What Happens

Type 1 Diabetes - What Happens

It's not possible for injected insulin to work as well as a normal pancreas, so you will have high and low blood sugar levels from time to time. If your blood sugar stays above your target range for a long time, it can damage many parts of your body . High blood sugar levels can lead to vision loss and blindness (diabetic retinopathy). To learn more, see the topic Diabetic Retinopathy. Having diabetes also puts you at risk for cataracts or glaucoma. You may have less feeling in your feet, which means that you can injure your feet and not know it. Common infections from blisters, ingrown toenails, small cuts, or other problems can quickly become more serious when you have diabetes. If you get serious infections or bone and joint deformities, you may need surgery (even amputation) to treat those problems. High blood sugar damages the lining of large blood vessels. This can lead to stroke, heart attack, or peripheral arterial disease. High blood sugar levels can damage nerves throughout your body. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. There are three kinds of diabetic neuropathy: Diabetic peripheral neuropathyDiabetic peripheral neuropathy. This is damage to the nerves that sense pain, touch, hot, and cold. This type of nerve damage can lead to deformities such as Charcot foot . It can also lead to other problems that may require amputation. Autonomic neuropathyAutonomic neuropathy. This is damage to nerves that control things like your heartbeat, blood pressure, sweating, digestion, urination, and sexual function. Focal neuropathyFocal neuropathy. Most of the time, this affects just one nerve, usually in the wrist, thigh, or foot. It may also affect the nerves of your back and chest and those that control your eye muscles. To learn more, see the topic Diabetic Neurop Continue reading >>

Guys If I Stop Insulin What Will Happen ????? Or Should I Re

Guys If I Stop Insulin What Will Happen ????? Or Should I Re

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Guys if i stop insulin what will happen ????? Or should i re Guys i think my insulin is making me sick so giys if i stop insulin what will happen because from tommorow i am stopping my insulin .... Guys i need input pls help me and advice me ...... Do u think my sugar level will go up .... Actually i want to set my insulin levels again .... So i am stopping it or should i reduce it to good level ..... I really dont know i think too much insulin in my body making me sick !!!!!! Newly daignosed , novomix 30 , 21units in morning and 17 at night , have issues in eating and sleeping pls help me , why my morning BS is always high ???? Late night eating is the problem , so please help me guys Re: Guys if i stop insulin what will happen ????? Or should Sameer, I think you need to talk to a doctor. It appears you're struggling at present but your doctor can advise you better than we can ! Good luck ! Re: Guys if i stop insulin what will happen ????? Or should There is a reason why your doctor prescribed insulin for you to use. It is because your blood sugar levels went very high and you were in danger of dying. Do you not think it is a bit silly of you to contemplate stopping it? What do you think will happen to you if you stop? If you are having hypo feelings, its either because you are not eating enough carbohydrate at set meal times or if you are eating correctly, maybe the insulin doseage needs to adjusted. What you must not do if you want to live, is stop insulin. Re: Guys if i stop insulin what will happen ????? Or should I really dont know , yes i want to lower my dose What is that i am having brain fog !!! Difficulty in concentration pla guide !!! Newl Continue reading >>

What To Do If You Run Out Of Insulin

What To Do If You Run Out Of Insulin

We have read several tragic examples of people in the United States dying because of lack of insulin or because of an expired insulin prescription, and countless more stories of people skipping injections or meals because of the high price of insulin. We asked Jennifer Smith, a certified diabetes educator with Integrated Diabetes Management, to provide a guide of what do if you run out of insulin. Even if you know this information already, please share this so others know they have options. Since insulin is vital to the health of people with Type 1 diabetes, it is imperative to have access 24/7. If you run out of insulin or if your prescription happens to be expired, you’ll need to have a backup plan. High blood glucose levels from lack of insulin can lead very quickly to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a potentially deadly condition. sponsor Here are some suggestions for what to do: If you run out of insulin due to prescription lapse, the pharmacy can typically call your physician to get that prescription updated within the same day as long as you call during business hours. Also, a few states have passed laws allowing pharmacists to dispense insulin on an emergency basis from an expired prescription. Make sure you stress to the pharmacist the urgency of the situation, as some aren’t as well trained as others in matters of Type 1 diabetes care. If you have run out and it’s a holiday or weekend, or you can’t get ahold of the doctor, the best option is to have a backup plan for use of over-the-counter NPH and R insulin which can be purchased over the counter at Walmart as part of its ReliOn Brand. This option is available in all states save for Indiana. If there is no way to get insulin due to the time of day or cost, go to an Urgent Care clinic or an Emergency Room Continue reading >>

Insulin. What Does It Do?

Insulin. What Does It Do?

Glucose comes from the digestion of almost all foods, especially starchy ones. We need insulin to make energy from the glucose in these foods. Insulin is a special chemical (hormone) made by the pancreas gland, and allows the glucose from the blood stream to get in to our body’s cells to give us energy. Without insulin the glucose remains in the bloodstream and cannot give us the energy we need. In someone who does not have diabetes the amount of insulin produced depends on the amount of glucose/starchy foods eaten and the energy used and needed. Blood glucose level stays between 3.5 mmol/L and 7 mmol/L What happens when there is not enough insulin? When the pancreas fails to make enough insulin the glucose remains in the blood stream and the blood glucose level rises. This may come on gradually but eventually the glucose levels in the blood rise so high that they spill out of the blood stream through the kidneys and into the urine. The high blood sugar also pulls water out of the bloodstream, causing you to pass additional urine. This in turn makes you very thirsty. If the glucose in the blood cannot be used for energy the body has to find other alternative fuels. The body begins to use up fat stored around the body, and when fat is used to give the body energy ketones form. High blood glucose levels and ketones can make you feel very unwell. Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From Whitworth, United Kingdom: How long can someone live without insulin? Answer: The fact that you are asking the question has me suspiciously worried! I hope you are not trying to hurt yourself or planning to see how long you can go without insulin. The answer, perhaps, mostly lies in how long the person has had type 1 diabetes. For someone like yourself, who indicated that you have had diabetes for more than 10 years, you MIGHT be able to live for 7 to 10 or so days without insulin. But, the death would be awful and difficult and not peaceful. You would begin to have much urination and be extremely thirsty; but, you would also develop abdominal pain and get nauseated and vomit so you might drink but not be able to keep anything down with all the vomiting. You would start to get achy and sore and could have a terrible headache as your brain began to swell! You would have blurred vision and would begin to become delirious before you probably would go into a coma and become brain dead. The death would be awful to watch and impossible to bear by those that love you. And even if you did not progress that far to death, if there were too much delay before you could get taken to an emergency room, the damage may already have been done and it might be too late to reverse matters back to normal. DO NOT OMIT YOUR INSULIN DOSES. Additional comments from Dr. Tessa Lebinger: Some children and teenagers are so dependent on insulin, they could develop life threatening ketoacidosis in less than one day if they skip their insulin, especially if they are sick with another illness. Most people who make no insulin are very uncomfortable within 12 hours of missing a dose. People who are still making a lot of insulin and are still in the remission phase, may be able to stop insu Continue reading >>

Taking Care Of Diabetes

Taking Care Of Diabetes

Since our pancreas does not make insulin, we have to take insulin as medicine so that glucose can get from our blood and into our cells to give us energy to do things. Your doctor will tell you how much insulin you need. It can be a little scary at first and there is a lot to understand, that’s why I am here, to help you know what you need to learn. Testing Blood Glucose Because diabetes affects the glucose in your blood, it is important to measure this with a blood glucose meter. You will get used to having your blood glucose meter with you all of the time because checking your glucose level is the only way to know if your diabetes is under control. You always need some glucose in your blood, but not too much. If your blood glucose gets too high or too low it can make you feel sick so you will always want to avoid that. Your doctor will tell you what your glucose levels should be. Low Blood Glucose Low blood glucose happens when you take more insulin than your body needs. It means that too much glucose moved from your blood into your cells, not leaving enough glucose back in the blood (called hypoglycemia). This can be very dangerous. If your blood glucose is low you may feel shaky, start sweating, get a headache, feel dizzy, or your heart may start pounding. These are called symptoms, and they warn you that you need to eat or drink some sugar right away. High Blood Glucose High blood glucose happens when you don’t take enough insulin – when there is too much glucose in your blood (called hyperglycemia). High blood glucose levels can be harder to notice at first, another reason why it is important to test your blood glucose often. Most of the time, you can take insulin so that your high glucose goes down. But if you don’t take insulin and your blood glucose sta Continue reading >>

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