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Diabetes Tool Canada

Resources For Diabetes Prevention And Management

Resources For Diabetes Prevention And Management

Resources for Diabetes Prevention and Management If you are living with diabetes or supporting someone with diabetes, check out these useful resources like cookbooks, websites and support groups. Do you need help with diabetes-friendly meal ideas?Cookbooks can help! Look for these books at your local library or bookstore. Check out recipes on the Canadian Diabetes Associations website and this Diabetes Menu Plan . The Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care has a program called Stand Up to Diabetes, which has tools and information to help with diabetes management. Watch videos that can help with: Managing your nutrition (specific information is available for South Asian, First Nations, Caribbean and East Asian populations) Get your Diabetes Passport to help you keep track of your diabetes care plan. Find fact sheets on preventing and managing diabetes. They are available in13 languages. Public Health Agency of Canada Available programs Connecting with other people living with diabetes can help you get the support and information you need. Contact theCanadian Diabetes Associationto find out about diabetes support groups in your area. There are many websites, tools and resources to help you manage diabetes. Stay informed by using these helpful links. You can also call EatRight Ontario at 1-877-510-510-2 or send an email for information and advice on managing your diabetes. Dietitians look beyond fads to deliver reliable, life-changing advice. Want to unlock the potential of food? Connect with a dietitian . Continue reading >>

Diabetes Toolbox | For Health Professionals | Understanding Diabetes

Diabetes Toolbox | For Health Professionals | Understanding Diabetes

Living with diabetes means developing a lifestyle that allows you to control the disease while staying active. Living with diabetes means developing a lifestyle that allows you to control the disease while staying active. To learn more Steve Chalifoux, a pivot nurse in diabetes at the Cit-de-la-Sant hospital of CISSS de Laval, designed with the help of a developer Mr. Benot Bouchard, a web application that brings together, in one place, essential tools to health professionals working with diabetic clients. Links to diabetes associations and resources Information relating to the anti-diabetic medications and insulins The codes and forms for the coverage of medicine by the public drug insurance plan This free and bilingual application can easily be accessed on a mobile device as well as on a personal computer. Useful links Useful documents Store Mobile tools For health professionals Maps Glossary Steve Chalifoux, a pivot nurse in diabetes at the Cit-de-la-Sant hospital of CISSS de Laval, designed with the help of a developer Mr. Benot Bouchard, a web application that brings together, in one place, essential tools to health professionals working with diabetic clients. Links to diabetes associations and resources Information relating to the anti-diabetic medications and insulins The codes and forms for the coverage of medicine by the public drug insurance plan This free and bilingual application can easily be accessed on a mobile device as well as on a personal computer. Continue reading >>

Validating The Canrisk Prognostic Model For Assessing Diabetes Risk In Canada's Multi-ethnic Population.

Validating The Canrisk Prognostic Model For Assessing Diabetes Risk In Canada's Multi-ethnic Population.

Validating the CANRISK prognostic model for assessing diabetes risk in Canada's multi-ethnic population. Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. [email protected] Despite high rates of undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes, suitable risk assessment tools for estimating personal diabetes risk in Canada are currently lacking. We conducted a cross-sectional screening study that evaluated the accuracy and discrimination of the new Canadian Diabetes Risk Assessment Questionnaire (CANRISK) for detecting diabetes and prediabetes (dysglycemia) in 6223 adults of various ethnicities. All participants had their glycemic status confirmed with the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We developed electronic and paper-based CANRISK scores using logistic regression, and then validated them against reference standard blood tests using test-set methods. We used area under the curve (AUC) summary statistics from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses to compare CANRISK with other alternative risk-scoring models in terms of their ability to discern true dysglycemia. The AUC for electronic and paper-based CANRISK scores were 0.75 (95% CI: 0.73-0.78) and 0.75 (95% CI: 0.73-0.78) respectively, as compared with 0.66 (95% CI: 0.63-0.69) for the Finnish FINDRISC score and 0.69 (95% CI: 0.66-0.72) for a simple Obesity model that included age, BMI, waist circumference and sex. CANRISK is a statistically valid tool that may be suitable for assessing diabetes risk in Canada's multi-ethnic population. CANRISK was significantly more accurate than both the FINDRISC score and the simple Obesity model. Continue reading >>

Knowledge Translation (kt)

Knowledge Translation (kt)

CoLeads: Sophie Desroches, France Lgar CoInvestigators : Joyce Dogba, Noah Ivers, Monika Kastner, Hlne LeeGosselin, Lori MacCallum, Mathieu Ouimet, Monica Parry, MariePascale Pomey, MarieClaude Tremblay, Brigitte Vachon, Holly Witteman, Catherine Yu The Knowledge Translation (KT) Enabling Program, under the co-leadership of Sophie Desroches and France Lgar, has established an integrated program with Diabetes Action Canada. The objective is to facilitate the application of research findings into healthcare practices. Our team support members of Diabetes Action Canada for contributing to the science and practice on how to better move knowledge into practice. Also, the goal is to facilitate the support for new models of care that will result in better outcomes and better experience for individuals living with diabetes and this, at reduced cost. Ultimately, our goal is to help more people living with diabetes to have better outcomes, better experience with their healthcare, and at optimal cost.) -Improve the knowledge base on patientoriented KT research regarding diabetes and its related complications -Develop strategic partnerships with different stakeholders to disseminate the work done by Diabetes Action Canada members. To date, the KT Enabling Group has initiated or assisted researchers in evaluating the potential to scale-up their successful evidence-based products. Examples of our KT research programs and ongoing interactions are below: -Build capacity on KT research among Diabetes Action Canada students and postdoctoral fellows: A first edition (2017-2018) of this program was a success. Two PhD candidates and two postdoctoral fellowships were awarded in a peer reviewed process. Students and fellows completed their project and submitted their final report. -Conduct a Continue reading >>

My Site - Screening 2018

My Site - Screening 2018

Screen every 3 years in individuals 40 years of age Screen every 3 years in individuals at high risk according to a risk calculator Screen earlier and/or more frequently (every 6 to 12 months) in people with additional risk factors for diabetes (see below) Screen earlier and/or more frequently in people at very high risk according to a risk calculator Conditions that lead to misleading A1C include: hemoglobinopathies, hemolytic anemia, iron deficiency, severe renal or liver disease. Link to Table 1, Monitoring for Glycemic Control. Validated Assay: A1C must be measured using a validated assay standardized to the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program-Diabetes Control and Complications Trial reference. Ethnicity: Studies indicate that African Americans, American Indians, Hispanics and Asians have A1C values that are up to 0.4% higher than those of Caucasian patients at similar levels of glycemia (17,18) . Research is required to determine if A1C levels differ in African Canadians or Canadian First Nations. Age: A1C values are affected by age, rising by up to 0.1% per decade of life (20,21) . More studies may help to determine if age- or ethnic-specific adjusted A1C thresholds are required for diabetes diagnosis. Special Populations: A1C is not recommended for diagnostic purposes in children, adolescents, pregnant women or those with suspected type 1 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing Goes Wireless, Painless For Diabetes Patients

Blood Sugar Testing Goes Wireless, Painless For Diabetes Patients

Open this photo in gallery: Now that is cool: Testing your sugar without needles and without blood droplets. In Europe, the medical company Abbott has just released its FreeStyle Libre system, which may usher in a revolution in diabetes care. And both doctors and patients can't wait. Prabahar Gopalakrishnan, 26, is a type 1 diabetic who has taken daily insulin injections since the age of seven. "I've probably pricked my fingers almost 15,000 times so far," he tells me. When I tell him about the new system, he finds it hard to believe. "You mean I might never have to poke myself again?" Chandroutie Permaul, a 65-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, also finds routine self-testing problematic. "My flesh gets so tender," she complains. "And when I wash the dishes, it just burns and burns." These hassles may soon be a thing of the past. The Libre system uses an advanced, coin-size sensor that is worn on the arm for two weeks at a time. According to the instructions, a tiny "filament is inserted just under the skin and held in place with a small adhesive pad." It comes with a hand-held scanner which looks like a largish smartphone. Swiping the scanner over the sensor instantly measures your sugar, displaying the result in "less than one second." Speaking at the European launch in Vienna, Jared Watkin, a technology vice-president at Abbott, also demonstrated that you can even scan the sensor "through your clothes." You don't even need to calibrate the system with a test drop of blood. That's remarkable – and unheard of in the diabetes world. "Patients would fly with this," says Dr. Susan Burlacoff, a Toronto family physician. She believes there will be great utility of this bloodless system in her own practice. "It's painless, convenient, without needles and [patients] woul Continue reading >>

Findrisc Diabetes Risk Calculator

Findrisc Diabetes Risk Calculator

AS: Aortic Valve Area (Cont)Estimate aortic valve area AS: Aortic Valve Area (DVI)Estimate aortic valve area AS: Aortic Valve Area (Gorlin)Estimate aortic valve area AS: Aortic Valve Area (Hakki)Estimate aortic valve area Surgery in Asymptomatic Aortic StenosisAssess timing of surgery in severe, asymptomatic aortic stenosis Aortic Stenosis Risk ScoreEstimate risk of cardiovascular events in patients with aortic stenosis HCM Risk-SCDAssess risk of sudden cardiac death and need for ICD in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ADviSED - Aortic Dissection Detection Risk Score Plus D-Dimer for Aortic SyndromesRule out aortic dissection and other aortic syndromes Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation: OBRIThe Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index (OBRI) estimates risk of bleeding in AF while on oral anticoagulation. CHADS2 Score for AFAssess risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation CHA2DS2-VASc Score for AFReplacement for CHADS2 for stroke prediction in atrial fibrillation Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation: HAS-BLED ScoreUnderstand the risk of bleeding from anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation Warfarin Bleeding Risk - ElderlyEstimate 90 day risk of bleeding in patients on warfarin who are >65 years Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation: ATRIA Estimate bleeding risk for patients on warfarin. Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation: OBRIThe Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index (OBRI) estimates risk of bleeding in AF while on oral anticoagulation. CRUSADE Score for Post-MI Bleeding RiskEstimate bleeding risk after NSTEMI. Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation: HAS-BLED ScoreUnderstand the risk of bleeding from anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation Warfarin Bleeding Risk - ElderlyEstimate 90 day risk of bleeding in patients on warfarin who are >65 years MR: Quantification (PISA) MR: Quantification (Volum Continue reading >>

Resources And Links | Diabetes At School

Resources And Links | Diabetes At School

B.C. Ministry of Children and Family Development: Nursing Support Services:Practice standards, forms, other resources International Diabetes Federation: Kids and Diabetes in School (KiDS) program includes an information package in eight languages, suitable for downloading and printing, as well as an app. Each product has sections for parents of children with diabetes, parents in general, children, and teachers. IWK Health Centre Pediatric Diabetes Team in Halifax: Online video training modules for teachers. National Diabetes Education Program(U.S.): Helping the Student with Diabetes Succeed A Guide for Personnel Bolus insulin calculator for school lunches :To access this handy tool developed by B.C. Children's Hospital, click on "Basal-Bolus Insulin with MDI", then choose from among a number of links that will automatically calculate insulin dose for specific situations. Fondation Ressources pour les enfants diabtiques (FRED): Supports children and youth in Quebec with type 1 diabetes and their families Canadian MedicAlert Foundation:No Child Without - Free membership in MedicAlert (including bracelet, to children 4 to 14 years) Waltzing the Dragon: A parent-created site with information on all aspects of living with type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

2011- 2012 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-based Program Projects - Funded Projects

2011- 2012 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-based Program Projects - Funded Projects

2011- 2012 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-Based Program Projects - Funded projects The Canadian Diabetes Strategy (CDS) is a national initiative that works with the provinces and territories, various national health bodies and interest groups across the country working together to prevent diabetes, particularly among vulnerable and high-risk populations, and to promote early detection and management of the disease. The purpose of the CDS is to articulate and establish effective diabetes prevention and control strategies for Canada. This work involves building on what has already been accomplished and carrying it forward creatively. With access to the collective knowledge and experience of its various partners, the CDS is well positioned to determine where the needs and gaps lie, and to ensure that resources are deployed accordingly. 2011 - 2012 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-Based Program projects The funding priorities of the 2011 - 2012 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-Based Program were to support the development of tools and approaches for the screening and early detection of gestational and type 2 diabetes and for the development of tools to help Canadians self-manage all types of diabetes. In addition, the solicitation priorities addressed the secondary complications of diabetes including: cardiovascular disease; kidney disease, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic foot ulcers and wounds; and mental health/mental illness among Canadians living with diabetes. These priorities were established in consultation with stakeholders. Highlights, including objectives, results and lessons learned, are provided for 10 diabetes projects. Canadian Association of Wound Care: Peer Education Program (PEP) Talk: Healthy Feet and You The Canadian Association of Wound Car Continue reading >>

Canadian Task Force On Preventive Health Care | Diabetes, Type 2clinician Findrisc

Canadian Task Force On Preventive Health Care | Diabetes, Type 2clinician Findrisc

Using the Risk Calculator, determine your patients risk score, then use the results table to calculate your patients diabetes risk. Please note that there is a corresponding Type 2 Diabetes Risk Calculator for Patients . Please note: Recommendations are presented for screening asymptomatic adults for type 2 diabetes using blood tests. These recommendations do not apply to adults already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, those at risk for type 1 diabetes, or those with symptoms of diabetes. Symptoms of diabetes include: unusual thirst, frequent urination, weight change (gain or loss), extreme fatigue or lack of energy, blurred vision, frequent and recurring infections, cuts and bruises that are slow to heal, and/or tingling or numbness in the hands or feet. Add up points to determine your patients total risk score. Use your patients results from the risk calculator in the results table to determine the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC)s screening recommendations. 2. What is your patients body-mass index (BMI) category? Visit bmi-calculator.net for a BMI calculator a. Normal (Lower than 25.0 kg/m)(0 points) b. Overweight (25.029.9 kg/m)(1 points) c. Obese (30.0 kg/m or higher)(3 points) 3. What is your patients waist circumference? Waist circumference is measured below the ribs (usually at the level of the navel). a. Less than 94 cm (less than ~ 37 inches) for men; orLess than 80 cm (less than ~ 31 inches) for women(0 points) b. 94102 cm (~ 3740 inches) for men; or8088 cm (~ 3135 inches) for women(3 points) c. More than 102 cm (more than ~ 40 inches) for men; orMore than 88 cm (more than ~ 35 inches) for women(4 points) 4. Is your patient physically active for more than 30 minutes every day? This includes physical activity during work, leisure, or regu Continue reading >>

Managing Type 1 Diabetes In School: Recommendations For Policy And Practice

Managing Type 1 Diabetes In School: Recommendations For Policy And Practice

Principal author(s) Sarah E Lawrence MD, Elizabeth A Cummings MD, Danièle Pacaud MD, Andrew Lynk MD, Daniel L Metzger MD Paediatr Child Health 2015;20(1):35-39. Abstract Diabetes requiring insulin is increasingly common and likely to impact students in most, if not all, schools. Diabetes and its complications have major personal, social and economic impact, and improved diabetes control reduces the risk of both short- and long-term complications. Evidence shows that more intensive management of diabetes – through frequent blood glucose monitoring, insulin administration with injections and/or insulin pumps, and careful attention to diet and exercise – leads to better control. Since children spend 30 to 35 hours per week at school, effectively managing their diabetes while there is integral to their short- and long-term health. The Canadian Paediatric Society and the Canadian Pediatric Endocrine Group recommend that minimum standards for supervision and care be established across Canada to support children and youth with type 1 diabetes in schools. These recommendations are derived from evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, with input from diabetes care providers from across Canada, and are consistent with the Canadian Diabetes Association’s Guidelines for the Care of Students Living with Diabetes at School. Key Words: Education; Policy; Type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Topics Catalogue

Diabetes Topics Catalogue

To search this Diabetes Topics Catalogue, hold "Ctrl" + "f" (PC) or "Cmd" + "f" (Mac) and type in your search word. Consider giving all your patients the short list of Diabetes Resources for Patients (diabetes phone-lines, classes, urgent help, routine 1:1 help). Patient Worksheet - Managing Your Blood Sugars (AHS) The following are some of the many tools available for determining the carbohydrate content of foods. Not all sources of carbohyrate content may be acccurate (particularly for apps). Labels: Subtract grams of fibre from the grams of carbohydrate for the portion on the label. Related "Matching Carbohydrate to Insulin" handout in Diabetes Type 1 heading below. Restaurant websites: Many fast food and other restaurants have nutrient analysis posted online for their products. Nutrient Analysis Apps: Through smart phones' app stores or AppCrawlr . General carbohydrate estimates. One carbohydrate choice contains 15 grams of carbohydrate (after the fibre is subtracted).A general guideline for the number of carbohydrate choices to eat per meal is 2-4 for most women and 4-6 for most men. For snacks: 0-1 for women and 0-2 carb choices for men. 1/2 cup (125 mL) cooked pasta/potato/other starch To access AHS Nutrition handouts see Nutrition Resources below. Other handouts available through a dietitian. Nutrient Analysis Websites (we cannot verify accuracy of data): Encourage patients to contact their Primary Care Network (PCN) regarding classes. PCN information can be accessed through mypcn.ca Client Centered Counseling (Motivational Interviewing) Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Dexcom Trend Arrows: Preventing high and low glucose readings by adjusting See Diabetes Services Calgary page for referral documents Nutrition handouts for diabetes in pregnancy see Nutrition Continue reading >>

Canrisk Tools - English

Canrisk Tools - English

CANRISK Questionnaire User Guide for Pharmacists Patient Guide Additional Resources Available in 13 different languages, CANRISK is a questionnaire that pharmacists can use to help patients identify their risk of pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. It is intended for adults aged 45 to 74, but may also be used for younger groups in high-risk populations. By implementing the CANRISK questionnaire in your community pharmacy, you will be playing a key role in the prevention and early detection of diabetes. Developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), CANRISK was adapted from a similar questionnaire used in Finland as part of its national diabetes prevention program (FINDRISC). PHAC convened a group of clinical and academic experts to modify the questionnaire so it would more accurately reflect known diabetes risk factors applicable to Canadians; this included adding new questions on ethnicity, education and gestational diabetes. CANRISK scores have been validated against diagnostic gold standard blood tests in a recent Canadian study for use in assessing diabetes risk in Canada's multi-ethnic population. This peer-reviewed study involved more than 6000 blood-tested adults (Chronic Diseases and Injuries in Canada, Dec. 2011). CANRISK Questionnaire (available in 13 languages) Download the questionnaires to your computer or tablet in order to have them readily available for screening in your pharmacy. You can also access the English and French questionnaires online via PHAC's CANRISK website ( en franais ). * Documents noted with an asterisk are slightly modified versions of the orginal CANRISK tool, created by the Canadian Task Force on Preventative Health Care (CTFPHC). When completing or reviewing the results of the CANRISK questionnaire with your patients, be sure Continue reading >>

My Site - Smbg Tool

My Site - Smbg Tool

NPH or long-acting insulin analogue, typically given at bedtime. SMBG 2 times per day, to assist in lifestyle and/or medication changes until glycemic targets are met. Optional, less frequent SMBG can be done at other times of day to detect hypoglycemia caused by secretagogue, if applicable. If initiating basal insulin, focus should be mostly on the before breakfast SMBG test; the before supper and bedtime SMBG testing is less important / optional. If patient is on basal insulin, before breakfast SMBG test is to target but A1C is not to target, focus should be more on the before supper and bedtime SMBG testing. Basal insulin may be given in combination with secretagogue, non-secretagogue or injectable (GLP-1 analogue) medications. Insulin doses are typically given as a rapid-acting analogue or regular insulin (bolus) before one meal plus NPH or long-acting insulin analogue given at bedtime. SMBG at least as often as insulin is being given. In the example shown, the bolus insulin is given at supper but could be given at breakfast or lunch. The bolus insulin is typically given with the largest meal or the meal with the highest post-meal BG. Basal plus NPH or a long-acting insulin may be given in combination with secretagogue (at a different time than bolus insulin), non-secretagogue or injectable (GLP-1 analogue) medications. SMBG BID (alternating times) is usually sufficient once glycemic targets are met. QID (Basal-Bolus / Multiple Daily Injections [MDI]) Insulin doses are typically given as a rapid-acting analogue or regular insulin (bolus) before each meal, and NPH or long-acting analogue (basal) typically given at bedtime. SMBG at least as often as insulin is being given. SMBG should be QID, pre-meal and bedtime, in order to assess previous dose, and to adjust next Continue reading >>

The Ocfp Insulin Prescription Tool Has Moved To Diabetes Canada

The Ocfp Insulin Prescription Tool Has Moved To Diabetes Canada

Clinical Tools and Resources for Primary Care The Centre for Effective Practice and the OCFP are looking for family doctors to take part in focus groups related to new clinical tools. Register with Centre for Effective Practice to indicate your interest and receive more details about teleconferences and other opportunities. Tool development expertise is not required just an interest in improving the tools available to support your practice. Clinical Tools and Resources for Primary Care The OCFP Insulin Prescription Tool has moved to Diabetes Canada The Insulin Prescription Tool developed by the OCFP has been transitioned to Diabetes Canada which will update the resource as needed. To ensure you have the most up-to-date version, please check regularly for updates on the Diabetes Canada website. Download the tool from Diabetes Canada here . The Clinical Tools and Resourceslisting links primary care providers withinformation that mayaid in their clinical decision making. In most cases, these resources are created by third parties. The Ontario College of Family Physicians accepts no responsibility for the use or misuse of any of the information provided.Users are required to use their own clinical judgement when dealing with the individual patient. The OCFP has attempted to provide up-to-date materials for clinician use while recognizing that the rapid evolution of materials may result in the information provided becoming outdated.Users are encouraged to consult the original sources for updated versions as they become available and for further information about the individual resource, its terms of use and limitations.Inclusion in thelisting does not indicate endorsement by the OCFP. Continue reading >>

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