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Diabetes Implant Device

Insulin Pump Types

Insulin Pump Types

Closed loop insulin pumps are still being researched Insulin pumps come in a variety of forms. Tethered and patch pumps are the options currently available on the NHS or to buy privately. At the moment, a new breed of extra intelligent insulin pumps (closed loop insulin pumps) are being tested under supervised conditions for research and could start to become available if the trials are successful. Tethered insulin pumps are those that have a length of flexible tubing between the pump itself and the cannula (the short, thin tube which goes through the skin). The pump itself, which usually feature controls, is free to be tucked into pockets or carried in pump pouches which can be worn under or outside of clothing. Some tethered pumps may also have controls on a separate handset which may also double up as a blood glucose monitor . Commonly available examples of tethered pumps include: A patch pump is where the pump is attached to the surface of the skin. To allow the pump to be as small as possible, the controls for the pump are located on remote control. The remote control may also serve as a blood glucose meter. One of the benefits of a patch pump is that theres no tubing to catch on handles and other such objects but you may still need to be wary of where your pump is to prevent knocking or dislodging the pump. Currently, the mylife OmniPod is the only patch pump approved for use in the UK. An implanted insulin pump is a pump which remains inside the body at all times. An implanted insulin pump is able to deliver insulin into the peritoneal cavity which has a rich supply of blood vessels and can therefore absorb insulin very efficiently. Users of implanted insulin pumps have reported an improved sense of well being but there are a number practical disadvantages inclu Continue reading >>

A Review Of The Management Of Implanted Medical Devices For Diabetes: Trends And Directions

A Review Of The Management Of Implanted Medical Devices For Diabetes: Trends And Directions

Go to: Point-in-Time Solutions Active management of diabetes mellitus involves the interplay between the measurement of fluctuating glucose levels and the delivery of one or more therapeutics to maintain blood glucose within desired ranges.1 Historical approaches have been based on multiple daily invasive measurements possibly coupled with insulin injections to provide this control over serum glucose levels. However, this approach has limited desirability from both the clinician's and the patient's perspective. Effective point-in-time glucose measurement or therapy delivery is highly dependent on patient compliance.2 This compliance is requisite at multiple points throughout the day in order to maintain blood glucose levels within desired baselines or postprandial excursions. Compounding the difficulty of effective patient compliance are complicated treatment regimens based on multiple formulations, activity, diet, injection pain, convenience, and social discomfort.3 Taken together, these factors lessen the likelihood of effective compliance, even if appropriate therapeutic agents and delivery regimens are available. That is, although patient compliance is a key component for effective diabetes management, patients are understandably demotivated by the pain and frequency of the required needle sticks and the complexity of treatment schedules. No matter how well-motivated an individual patient may be, understanding and lifestyle may preclude the individual from achieving the desired frequency of glucose measurement and therapy delivery for optimal management of their diabetes. In an ideal world, diabetes management would include a system that would automatically, painlessly, and unobtrusively provide measurement of glucose levels and delivery of therapy, e.g., insulin, s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Erectile Dysfunction

Diabetes And Erectile Dysfunction

Diabetes, high blood pressure (hypertension), elevations in blood lipids or cholesterol are considered blood vessel problems and have all been associated with Erectile Dysfunction. The blood vessel abnormalities caused by these diseases affect vessels throughout the body and often produce other symptoms of vascular diseases. Diabetics and patients with hypertension frequently have heart disease. These conditions typically interfere with the ability of the penile vessels to work properly and ultimately cause ED. ED & Diabetes Dr. J. Francois Eid discusses the relationship between ED and Diabetes. Diabetes is one of the most common causes of ED. Men who have Diabetes are three times more likely to have Erectile Dysfunction than men who do not have Diabetes. Among men with ED, those with Diabetes are likely to have experienced the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without Diabetes. A recent study of a clinic population revealed that 5% of the men with ED also had undiagnosed Diabetes. The risk of ED increases with the number of years you have Diabetes and the severity of your Diabetes. Even though 20% to 75% of men with Diabetes have ED, it can be successfully managed in almost all men. In regards to high blood pressure, this makes the heart work harder to pump blood which can prevent blood flow from reaching the penis and in turn prevent an erection. Recent reports say that close to 2 out of 3 men report a change in the quality of their erections if they have high blood pressure. It is established that Diabetes affects not only peripheral nerve function but peripheral blood flow as well. The association between Diabetes and ED was first documented in 1978. Men with Diabetes have four main risk factors for ED. First, diabetes can cause damage to nerves (ne Continue reading >>

Spider's Web Inspires Removable Implant That May Control Type 1 Diabetes

Spider's Web Inspires Removable Implant That May Control Type 1 Diabetes

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Spider's web inspires removable implant that may control type 1 diabetes For the more than 1 million Americans who live with type 1 diabetes, daily insulin injections are literally a matter of life and death. And while there is no cure, a team has developed a device that could revolutionize management of the disease. Doctoral students Alan Chiu, left, and Duo An hold a sample of TRAFFIC (Thread-Reinforced Alginate Fiber for Islets enCapsulation). In the background, left to right, are Minglin Ma, Dan Luo, Meredith Silberstein and Dr. James Flanders. Credit: Lindsay France/University Photography Doctoral students Alan Chiu, left, and Duo An hold a sample of TRAFFIC (Thread-Reinforced Alginate Fiber for Islets enCapsulation). In the background, left to right, are Minglin Ma, Dan Luo, Meredith Silberstein and Dr. James Flanders. Credit: Lindsay France/University Photography For the more than 1 million Americans who live with type 1 diabetes, daily insulin injections are literally a matter of life and death. And while there is no cure, a Cornell University-led research team has developed a device that could revolutionize management of the disease. In Type 1 diabetes, insulin-producing pancreatic cell clusters (islets) are destroyed by the body's immune system. The research group, led by assistant professor Minglin Ma from the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, has devised an ingenious method for implanting hundreds of thousands of islet cells into a patient. They are protected by a thin hydrogel coating and, more importantly, the coated cells are attached to a polymer thread and can be removed or replaced easily when they have outlived their usefulness. Transplantation of stem Continue reading >>

An Artificial Pancreas For Diabetics Could Hit The Market Next Year

An Artificial Pancreas For Diabetics Could Hit The Market Next Year

Medtronic (mdt, +0.04%) has reportedly filed for FDA approval of an “artificial pancreas” that could transform diabetes care. The medical device giant thinks its MiniMed 670G product could hit the market in 2017, according to Bloomberg. Fortune has contacted Medtronic to confirm the FDA filing and will update this post if it responds. Diabetes maintenance is time consuming and costly. Patients must regularly monitor their blood sugar and take insulin injections because their pancreas’ fail to produce enough insulin to counteract excess glucose in the blood. Hitting appropriate target levels can be difficult because of irregular dosing schedules. So, the 670G strives to largely automate the process. It uses a tech trifecta of a glucose sensor, an insulin pump, and a patch with a small needle that injects insulin from the pump into the body. All of this works in tandem with a wireless smartphone-type device that displays blood sugar and insulin metrics. The machine monitors glucose levels in five-minute intervals and shifts the amount of insulin it delivers to the patient, thus ensuring they remain in their target range. Click here to subscribe to our new Brainstorm Health Daily Newsletter. Richard Bergenstal, who led the trial supporting Medtronic’s FDA filing, told Bloomberg that the goal was make sure patients didn’t have to spend “every hour of the day worrying about their diabetes or preparing for the next event.” (The process isn’t fully automated. Patients must still refill the insulin pump, change the sensor, and do a finger-prick test every 12 hours.) Drug and device makers have been experimenting with ways to improve how drugs are delivered to the body in order to increase patient compliance with their regimens and, the hope is, public health at Continue reading >>

Abbott Receives Fda Approval For The Freestyle Libre Pro System, A Revolutionary Diabetes Sensing Technology For Healthcare Professionals To Use With Their Patients - Sep 28, 2016

Abbott Receives Fda Approval For The Freestyle Libre Pro System, A Revolutionary Diabetes Sensing Technology For Healthcare Professionals To Use With Their Patients - Sep 28, 2016

Abbott Receives FDA Approval for the FreeStyle Libre Pro System, a Revolutionary Diabetes Sensing Technology for Healthcare Professionals to Use with Their Patients - Freestyle Libre Pro is a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system designed to provide a clear, visual snapshot of a patient's glucose levels, trends and patterns for up to 14 days - Requires no fingersticks to calibrate the system -- an advantage over other professional use CGM devices - Significantly lower cost than other professional CGM systems - Consumer version of the technology, FreeStyle Libre, is currently under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ABBOTT PARK, Ill., Sept. 28, 2016 Abbott today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the company's FreeStyle Libre Pro system, a revolutionary continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system for healthcare professionals to use with their patients with diabetes. FreeStyle Libre Pro system is designed to empower healthcare professionals to provide better diabetes management for diabetes patients. The system provides healthcare professionals with a visual snapshot of glucose data, known as the Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP), giving a more simplified and clear overview of not only glucose levels, but also patterns and trends within those levels. This valuable information helps healthcare professionals make better, customized treatment decisions for their patients and for a significantly lower cost than other professional CGM products availablei. Onnearly adaily basis, Eugene E. Wright, Jr., M.D. of DukeSouthern Regional Area Health Education Center in Fayetteville, N.C., finds it challenging to effectively treat his patients with diabetes when it comes to decisions around insulin, nutritionand medication. "My pati Continue reading >>

New Implants Could Treat Type 2 Diabetes Without Needles

New Implants Could Treat Type 2 Diabetes Without Needles

Implants that deliver a constant metered dose of medication have plenty of promise. They’re especially useful for making sure patients don’t have to orient their daily schedule around their medication times. For the same reasons, they’re a potential solution for patients who tend to forget to take medications that have to be delivered right on schedule. Their major strength is being able to keep a patient’s serum concentration of their medication at a specific level. For example: Nexplanon, a hormonal contraceptive implant, delivers a constant dose of medication that keeps a woman’s progesterone levels within a particular range that prevents her from ovulating. Too high or too low a dose, and everything would get out of whack. But the implant keeps the serum concentration pretty stable. But because of the steady diffusion of the active substance, such drug-delivery implants aren’t fabulous for conditions that require medication only when symptoms appear. There hasn’t been a lot of luck with an implant for asthma, for example, because we haven’t surpassed the rescue inhaler for timely asthma treatment. Another condition that has resisted the implant approach is type 2 diabetes. Because type 2 is all about insulin insensitivity, and insulin is something that operates in a tight feedback loop with fluctuating blood glucose levels, you don’t necessarily want a blood insulin concentration that’s always held stable at the same level. Monitoring Blood Chemistry in Real Time Not to worry, though: the biotechnologists are on this. Scientists are developing implantable biomedical microelectromechanical systems (bioMEMS) that can monitor your blood chemistry in real time, deliver timed and quantized doses of medication, and phone home to your doctor to report o Continue reading >>

A Quest: Insulin-releasing Implant For Type-1 Diabetes

A Quest: Insulin-releasing Implant For Type-1 Diabetes

Scientists in California think they may have found a way to transplant insulin-producing cells into diabetic patients who lack those cells — and protect the little insulin-producers from immune rejection. Their system, one of several promising approaches under development, hasn't yet been tested in people. But if it works, it could make living with diabetes much less of a burden. For now, patients with Type-1 diabetes have to regularly test their blood sugar levels, and inject themselves with insulin when it's needed. Some researchers are developing machines to automate that process. But Crystal Nyitray, founder and CEO of the biotechnology startup Encellin, in San Francisco, didn't want to use a machine to treat diabetes. As a graduate student in bioengineering at the University of California, San Francisco a few years ago, Nyitray wanted to try something different: living cells. "Cells are the ultimate smart machine," she says. Clinical trials that transplant insulin-making pancreatic cells into people with diabetes have been underway for several years, with some success. But the recipient's immune system is hard on these transplanted cells, and most patients still need insulin injections eventually. Nyitray and colleagues designed a system that would encase live islet cells from the pancreas in a flexible membrane that could be implanted under the skin. Insulin and blood sugar could pass through the membrane, but cells from the recipient's immune system would be kept out, preventing immune rejection. "I think of it like if you're sitting in a house and you have the window open with a screen," Nyitray says. "So you can feel the breeze of the air outside, and smell everything, but the bugs and the flies aren't able to get through because you have the screen in place. Continue reading >>

Thread-like Medical Implant Could Restore Insulin Production In Diabetics

Thread-like Medical Implant Could Restore Insulin Production In Diabetics

Doctoral students Alan Chiu, left, and Duo An hold a sample of TRAFFIC (Thread-Reinforced Alginate Fiber for Islets enCapsulation). In the background, left to right, are Minglin Ma, Dan Luo, Meredith Silberstein, and Dr James Flanders. A multidisciplinary team of medical researchers, engineers, and materials scientists based at Cornell University have created an implant with the potential to provide long-term treatment of the insulin deficiency that stems from type 1 diabetes (T1D). Patients with T1D are unable to produce adequate levels of insulin due to a poorly understood autoimmune reaction that destroys insulin-secreting beta cells within the pancreas. The disease often onsets during childhood, and affected individuals must continuously supplement with injections or an insulin pump to survive. Instead of delivering insulin into the bloodstream, the new invention transplants hundreds of thousands of stem cell-derived beta cells into the abdomen. The clusters of cells, called islets, are encased in a water-soluble hydrogel made from brown algae, reinforced by a central thread of modified nylon polymer suture. The string-like implant has been titled TRAFFIC, for Thread-Reinforced Alginate Fiber For Islets enCapsulation. The team shared in a statement that the concept was inspired by how drops of water cling to spider webs. TRAFFIC’s innovative design confers several key advantages over previous islet implants. The cells are protected from the body’s immune system, meaning potential patients would not require long-term immunosuppressants, a type of medication known for its serious side effects. Ironically, several anti-rejection drugs given to organ transplant patients can actually induce insulin resistance and lead to a form of type 2 diabetes (post-transplant dia Continue reading >>

Removable Implant May Control Type 1 Diabetes

Removable Implant May Control Type 1 Diabetes

For the more than 1 million Americans who live with type 1 diabetes, daily insulin injections are literally a matter of life and death. And while there is no cure, a Cornell-led research team has developed a device that could revolutionize management of the disease. In Type 1 diabetes, insulin-producing pancreatic cell clusters (islets) are destroyed by the body’s immune system. The research group, led by assistant professor Minglin Ma from the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, has devised an ingenious method for implanting hundreds of thousands of islet cells into a patient. They are protected by a thin hydrogel coating and, more importantly, the coated cells are attached to a polymer thread and can be removed or replaced easily when they have outlived their usefulness. Doctoral students Duo An and Alan Chiu are co-lead authors of the group’s paper, “Designing a Retrievable and Scalable Cell Encapsulation Device for Potential Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes,” published Dec. 25 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. An example of the “radical collaboration” concept that is a hallmark of Cornell research, this work also featured key contributions from: Dr. James Flanders from the College of Veterinary Medicine; professor Jintu Fan from the Department of Fiber Science & Apparel Design in the College of Human Ecology; and assistant professor Meredith Silberstein from the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering in the College of Engineering. Transplantation of stem cell-derived, insulin-producing islet cells is an alternative to insulin therapy, but that requires long-term immunosuppressive drug administration. One well-researched approach to avoid the immune system’s re Continue reading >>

New Stem Cell-based Implant Offers A ‘functional Cure’ For Type 1 Diabetes

New Stem Cell-based Implant Offers A ‘functional Cure’ For Type 1 Diabetes

We barely recovered from the excitement of editing human embryos in the U.S. but now the miracle of science has given us another reason to gape. Last week, two individuals with Type 1 diabetes received implants derived from embryonic stem cells in order to treat their chronic condition. This marks the first time that such an approach has been taken to curing diabetes. The new implants, known as PEC-Direct from Viacyte, are expected to release inulin when patients’ blood sugar levels rise, thereby returning them to normal levels. The immune systems of Type 1 diabetes patients attack insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, resulting in abnormally low levels of the crucial hormone. While doctors and scientists have long searched for a way to replenish insulin in the human body (often with stem cells), they have been unsuccessful so far. An implant, however, could be the answer. Scientists designed the new device to automatically release the hormone when it is needed, which allows stem cells to otherwise mature in the body while they are unneeded. “If successful, this strategy could really change the way we treat Type 1 diabetes in the future,” Emily Burns of the charity Diabetes U.K said. This is actually comparable to another treatment method, in which pancreas cells from organ donors are introduced into patients’ bodies. However, given the lack of donors available, this is often not the most dependable of solutions. Stem cells address this problem, as they can be produced in essentially infinite amounts. “A limitless source of human insulin-producing cells would be a major step forward on the journey to a potential cure for diabetes,” said James Shapiro at the University of Alberta, Canada, one of the pioneers of the original donor pancreas method. “For su Continue reading >>

Implanted Glucose Sensor Works For More Than One Year

Implanted Glucose Sensor Works For More Than One Year

The glucose sensor is featured on the cover of the July 28, 2010 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine. CREDIT: C. BICKEL/SCIENCE TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego and GlySens Incorporated have developed an implantable glucose sensor and wireless telemetry system that continuously monitors tissue glucose and transmits the information to an external receiver. The paper, published in the July 28, 2010 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine, describes the use of this glucose-sensing device as an implant in animals for over one year. After human clinical trials and FDA approval, the device may be useful to people with diabetes as an alternative to finger sticking, and to short-term needle-like glucose sensors that have to be replaced every three to seven days. "The Science Translational Medicine paper shows our implanted sensors to be successful in animals. You can run the device for a year or more with it constantly working, and recording glucose quite satisfactorily. Now, we are focused on getting the human clinical trials going. We hope to begin the first human trial within in a few months," said Gough, the bioengineering professor from the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. "If all goes well with the human clinical trials, we anticipate that in several years, this device could be purchased under prescription from a physician." Glucose Sensor Could be Useful for People with either Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes The long-term glucose sensor could be used by people with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. People with Type 1 diabetes do not make enough insulin of their own. The long-term glucose sensors could be used to adjust the insulin dose and timing of the injection, and reduce the risk of taking Continue reading >>

Intarcia To Submit Its Glp-1 Mini-pump Implant Device For Type 2 Diabetes To Fda Later This Year

Intarcia To Submit Its Glp-1 Mini-pump Implant Device For Type 2 Diabetes To Fda Later This Year

Matchstick-sized device implanted under the skin every 6-12 months. New data in over 4,000 people demonstrates it is safe for heart health. Could it launch by late 2017? Intarcia recently released reassuring results from a heart safety study of ITCA 650 – a small GLP-1 mini-pump device to treat type 2 diabetes – showing it meets the FDA’s heart safety pre-approval requirements. The device continuously releases exenatide (a well known GLP-1 agonist) through a small mini-pump the size of a matchstick, which is implanted under the skin just once or twice a year in a quick procedure (within a matter of minutes). The “FREEDOM-CVO” trial studied over 4,000 people with type 2 diabetes randomly assigned to take ITCA 650 or a placebo (in addition to other diabetes drugs), measuring ITCA 650’s impact on heart safety (including death, heart attack, stroke, and chest pain). The results? ITCA 650 met its primary and secondary endpoints and was found to be “non-inferior” to placebo – meaning that at minimum it didn’t worsen heart health. These results mean that ITCA 650 meets the FDA’s pre-approval heart safety requirements for new diabetes drugs, allowing Intarcia to submit ITCA 650 for review in the second half of 2016. If all goes well, ITCA 650 could be available for patients as soon as the end of 2017. We spoke with Intarcia CEO Mr. Kurt Graves to learn more about the results. Mr. Graves emphasized that the trial was sized and designed only to show non-inferiority, not “superiority” – which would indicate that ITCA 650 improves heart health. Other GLP-1 agonists have shown superiority in trials. But in order to evaluate and potentially show superiority, we note that the trial would likely have needed to be larger and have a longer treatment duration ( Continue reading >>

Pancreas Cell Implant Aims To Eliminate Insulin Injections

Pancreas Cell Implant Aims To Eliminate Insulin Injections

Encellin is working to eliminate insulin injections for diabetic patients with an insulin-producing implant containing live cells. A California startup hopes to eliminate insulin injections for diabetic patients with an insulin-producing implant containing live cells. The device is in preclinical trials and the company, Encellin, is preparing for clinical trials. The concept of packaging cells in semipermeable membranes could have other medical uses as well. Cells naturally produce small molecules, proteins, and hormones to keep a body functioning properly, Encellin CEO and co-founder Crystal Nyitray, who pioneered the technology, explained. Rather than relying on injections or pills to replace biomolecules not produced by diseased cells, she envisions medical treatments using encapsulated cells. “Cells are the ultimate smart machines,” Nyitray said. “The packages can hold molecular machines that secrete the necessary treatment.” About 20 million people worldwide have type-1 diabetes, which leaves them dependent on insulin injections to help regulate their blood sugar. The disease occurs when patients’ immune systems kills cells in the pancreas that produce the hormone insulin, which enables glucose, a form of sugar, to enter their cells. To replace the missing insulin, patients with type-1 diabetes inject themselves with insulin around mealtime. This helps their bodies utilize the surge of glucose that enters their bloodstream as they digest their food. Despite frequent monitoring of blood sugar levels and dose adjustments, insulin injections do not perfectly recreate the natural waves of insulin released from the pancreas. This leaves patients constantly working to avoid chronically high or low blood sugar, which can cause blindness, diabetic coma, or life-t Continue reading >>

Smart Technology For Diabetes Self-care

Smart Technology For Diabetes Self-care

Wearables, Implants, and Apps, Oh My! If you have diabetes, you must consistently monitor your diet, lifestyle, and glucose levels, and keeping track of everything can be both inconvenient and difficult. Matters can become even more complicated if you have other health conditions with which to contend. Fortunately, technology can help. Technological innovations Strides have been made to ensure technology keeps pace with assisting people in self-managing their diabetes. By incorporating a personalized approach, technology has become a useful tool; in particular, mobile and Internet-ready smartphones have been found to be the most effective for integrating diabetes care into day-to-day living. A 2009 study conducted by Julie Polisena and her team at the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health found storing or sharing self-monitored blood glucose using home telehealth tools such as PDAs or fax machines, supported with physician feedback, showed improved glycemic levels and reduced hospitalizations. Technology now has evolved beyond telehealth. Smart technology exists as wearables, implants, and mobile applications to track glucose levels, share data, access relevant information, communicate with both health-care providers and others with diabetes, and, ultimately, guide you in making better decisions. Wearable technology Wearable technology comprises gadgets that can be worn and are equipped with sensors and wireless connectivity to assist with monitoring blood sugar levels, personalizing treatment, connecting with health-care providers, and even delivering medication into the body. It’s a huge departure from the traditional finger pricking method of glucose monitoring. Some wearables on the horizon for diabetes include smart skin patches, contact lens, and Continue reading >>

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