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Diabetes Carb Counting Chart

Counting Carbohydrates Like A Pro

Counting Carbohydrates Like A Pro

Practical Tips for Accurate Counts Let’s get this straight: There is no such thing as a “pro” when it comes to carbohydrate counting. There is no master’s degree or PhD in Carbohydrate Science at any major university, nor is there a course focusing on counting carbohydrates in any dietetics or nutrition science program. And I’ve yet to meet anyone at a circus or carnival who, for a mere dollar, will “guess the carbohydrates” in your favorite food item, lest you win a valuable prize. So why would anyone with diabetes want to count carbohydrates “like a pro”? Simple. When it comes to keeping blood glucose levels in control, carbohydrate counting works better than any other system. Better than counting calories. Better than avoiding sugar. And certainly better (and simpler) than the exchange system. Carbohydrate is what raises blood glucose level abruptly after meals. Not fat or protein or vitamins or minerals. Just carbohydrate. Counting and managing the amount of carbohydrate in your diet has important benefits. If you take multiple daily injections of insulin or use an insulin pump, carbohydrate counting allows you to match doses of mealtime rapid-acting insulin to the foods you eat. This allows for almost unlimited dietary flexibility and helps to prevent post-meal highs and lows. If you control your diabetes with diet and exercise, pills, or just one or two insulin injections a day, you can also use carbohydrate counting to improve your control. Researchers at the University of Texas School of Allied Health Sciences in Galveston found that consistent carbohydrate intake (eating the same amount of carbohydrate at the same meals every day) in people with Type 2 diabetes leads to improvements in blood glucose control, whether or not a person also loses Continue reading >>

45 Top Carb-counting Tips

45 Top Carb-counting Tips

Tried-and-true tactics for fine-tuning your techniques and attitudes Carb counting sounds simple. After all, anyone who's passed third grade knows the basics of adding numbers. Unfortunately, counting carbohydrate grams isn't as easy as one, two, three. That's why Diabetes Forecast went to the experts for help. Who better to give tips on carb counting than the people who do it day in and day out? Read on for 45 tried-and-true carb-counting how-tos. "It's really important to work with your doctor," says Tammy Walker, 36, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes four years ago. "If you're newly diagnosed and your doctor doesn't have the experience, have your doctor refer you to a dietitian to teach you how to eat." "It's getting past that initial 'I can't do it,' " says Daniele Hargenrader, 31, who's had type 1 diabetes since she was 8. "The first days and weeks are the hardest. Anyone can change." Count total carbohydrate grams, not just the sugar grams listed on the food label, says David Frank, 41, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes a year ago. A cereal may only have 1 gram of sugar, for instance, but 21 grams of carbohydrate. "You have to look at the carbohydrates because carbohydrates break down into sugar." "The only way you can really know what your blood sugar is doing is if you have a readout. You can't guess what your blood sugar is," says Hargenrader. "And you can't guess how many carbs you need if you don't check your blood sugar." Checking before a meal and about two hours after the first bite shows you how what you eat affects your blood glucose. Intensive insulin users may do this frequently; for others, it can be helpful to do so when starting new medication or making other treatment changes. "They start to remember things," says Gabrielle Brits, whose Continue reading >>

Carb Counting If You Have Diabetes: 8 Key Steps To Know

Carb Counting If You Have Diabetes: 8 Key Steps To Know

iStock/4kodiak Because carbohydrates raise blood sugar, managing your carbs is key to managing your diabetes. One way to do it is through carbohydrate counting. Knowing how many carbs you can have throughout the day—and following those guidelines consistently every day—will set your blood sugar levels on an even keel, make you feel more energized, and help you avoid complications of diabetes. Most of the foods you eat—from milk and fruit to breads and grains—contain carbohydrates. There’s no way to avoid them, and you wouldn’t want to. Carbs serve as the main fuel source for your body. The trick is to avoid eating too many carbs in one day or at one sitting. Here are some of the best carbs for diabetics. When you eat carbs, your body breaks the food down into glucose, which enters the bloodstream. That triggers your pancreas to release the hormone insulin, which helps move the glucose into your cells for energy. The more carbohydrates you eat, the more insulin your body needs to help convert the food to energy. When you have diabetes, your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t use the insulin to move the glucose into the cells. Starved cells make you feel tired and sluggish. And chronically high blood sugar levels boost the production of free radicals and lower your immunity, on top of other negative effects. The key, then, is to gain better control over your blood sugar levels by learning just how many carbohydrates you should eat throughout the day. Here’s what to do. 1. Determine your activity level factor This is based on your gender and your level of physical activity. The more active you are, the more calories—and carbs—you can eat. If you’re a couch potato, rate yourself “sedentary.” If you exercise occasionally, r Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate-counting Chart For People With Diabetes

Carbohydrate-counting Chart For People With Diabetes

A Single-Serving Reference Guide Carbohydrates are your body’s main energy source. During digestion, sugar (simple carbohydrates) and starches (complex carbohydrates) break down into blood sugar (glucose). If you consume too much carbohydrate-rich food at one time, your blood sugar levels may rise too high, which can be problematic. Monitoring your carbohydrate intake is a key to blood sugar control, as outlined in a plan by your doctor or dietitian. Carbohydrates are found in lots of different foods. But the healthiest carbohydrate choices include whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes, beans, and low-fat dairy products. The chart below shows a single serving of carbohydrate-containing foods, which equals 15 grams: Grains 1 Serving = 15 g carbs Bagel (white or whole wheat) 1/2 of a small Bread (white or whole wheat) 1 slice (1 ounce) Bun (white or whole wheat) 1/2 of a small Crackers, round butter style 6 Dry cereal, unsweetened 3/4 cup English muffin 1/2 of a small Hot cereal (oatmeal, grits, etc.) 1/2 cup cooked Macaroni, noodles, pasta or spaghetti 1/3 cup cooked Pancakes and waffles 1 (4-inch diameter) Pizza crust, thin 1/8 of a 12-inch pizza Rice (white or brown) 1/3 cup cooked Beans & Legumes 1 Serving = 15 g carbs Baked beans 1/3 cup cooked Beans (navy, black, pinto, red, etc.) 1/2 cup cooked Lentils 1/2 cup cooked Starchy Vegetables 1 Serving = 15 g carbs Baked potato (regular or sweet) 1/2 medium (4 inches long) Corn 1/2 cup cooked French fries, regular cut 10-15 fries Peas 1/2 cup cooked Winter squash (acorn, butternut, etc.) 1 cup cooked Vegetable soup 1 cup Fruits 1 Serving = 15 g carbs Apple 1 small Banana 1/2 medium Blackberries/Blueberries 3/4 cup Canned fruit (in light syrup or juice) 1/2 cup Cantaloupe 1 cup cubed Cherries 12 to 15 Grapefruit 1/2 Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting 101

Carbohydrate Counting 101

Carbohydrate Counting 101 There are several different ways people with diabetes can manage their food intake to keep their blood glucose (sugar) within their target range and one such method is 'carbohydrate counting'. Carbohydrate, or carb counting is a method of calculating grams of carbohydrate consumed at meals and snacks. Foods that contain carb have the greatest effect on blood glucose compared to foods that contain protein or fat. Before starting any new treatment or meal plan, you should always consult with your diabetes care professional. What are the benefits of counting carbs? ·Counting carbohydrates is a good solution for many people with diabetes. Once you learn how to count carbs, you’ll find it easier to fit a wide variety of foods into your meal plan, including combination foods such as those in frozen dinners. For example, by checking the grams of total carbohydrate on the Nutrition Facts label on a frozen dinner, you can figure out how to fit the dinner into your carb allotment for a particular meal. Many people find carb counting to be much easier than using a more traditional exchange meal plan. ·Another benefit of counting carbohydrates is that it can bring tighter control over your glucose readings. Being as precise as possible with your carb intake and medication will help you better manage your blood glucose after meals. ·Lastly, if you take mealtime insulin, counting carbohydrates allows you to decide how much carb you want to eat at a meal, rather than having to eat a certain amount of carbohydrates, even if you do not want to. Who can use carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting can be used by anyone with diabetes, not just people taking insulin. This method is also useful for people who are using more intensive methods of adjusting i Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting, also called carb counting, is a meal planning tool for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrate counting involves keeping track of the amount of carbohydrate in the foods you eat each day. Carbohydrates are one of the main nutrients found in food and drinks. Protein and fat are the other main nutrients. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Carbohydrate counting can help you control your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels because carbohydrates affect your blood glucose more than other nutrients. Healthy carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are an important part of a healthy eating plan because they can provide both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, lower your cholesterol levels, and control your weight. Unhealthy carbohydrates are often food and drinks with added sugars. Although unhealthy carbohydrates can also provide energy, they have little to no nutrients. More information about which carbohydrates provide nutrients for good health and which carbohydrates do not is provided in the NIDDK health topic, Diabetes Diet and Eating. The amount of carbohydrate in foods is measured in grams. To count grams of carbohydrate in foods you eat, you’ll need to know which foods contain carbohydrates learn to estimate the number of grams of carbohydrate in the foods you eat add up the number of grams of carbohydrate from each food you eat to get your total for the day Your doctor can refer you to a dietitian or diabetes educator who can help you develop a healthy eating plan based on carbohydrate counting. Which foods contain carbohydrates? Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, such as b Continue reading >>

What Is Carb Counting?

What Is Carb Counting?

By the dLife Editors Carbohydrate counting is a method of meal planning that involves calculating the amount of carbs you eat at each meal and snack. Keeping track of your daily carbs can help you keep your blood sugar in your target range. That’s because carbs—which include sugars, starches, and fiber—affect your blood sugar more than protein or fat. Your body breaks carbohydrates down into glucose, which enters the bloodstream, raising your blood sugar levels. Balancing your carb intake with physical activity (and diabetes medications, if you take any) can help keep your blood sugar as close to normal as possible, which lowers your risk of diabetes-related complications. Simply counting the grams of carbs in the food you eat is the most popular and accurate method of carbohydrate counting. Older methods of keeping track of your carb intake include: The carb choice system. One “carb choice” is about 15 grams of carbs. Examples of foods that contain about 15 grams of carbs include one slice of bread; 1/3 cup of pasta or rice; 1 small fresh whole fruit; and 1/2 cup of starchy vegetables. A food with 30 grams of carbs would be considered two carb choices. The dietary exchange lists system. Each exchange list groups together foods that contain approximately the same amount of carbs, protein, fat, and calories—and therefore have about the same effect on your blood sugar. Any item on a specific food list can be exchanged with any other item on that list. For example, you could have 1/2 cup of beans or 1/3 cup of cooked pasta for your starch choice. The amount of carbs you should eat a day depends upon a variety of factors, including your age, weight, level of physical activity, medications, and blood sugar targets. Tips for Counting Carbs The first step in carb c Continue reading >>

How To Count Carbs For Better Blood Sugar Control

How To Count Carbs For Better Blood Sugar Control

Your doctor may have told you to “count carbs” or use something called the glycemic index to plan your meals. A healthy diet consists of a balance of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. However, people with type 2 diabetes need to watch carbohydrates carefully. Why? Because when any food that contains carbohydrates is digested, it turns into sugar, which increases your blood-glucose level. It’s pretty basic: Eating too many carbs can raise the amount of sugar in your bloodstream and lead to complications. The key for people like you with type 2 diabetes is to eat carbs in limited amounts at each meal and when you snack. Total carbs should make up about 45 to 60 percent of your daily diet (and be spaced out throughout the day) if you have type 2 diabetes. There’s no one diet that works for everyone with type 2 diabetes — there are just too many variables: Age, weight, level of physical activity, medications, as well as daily routine and personal preference need to be taken into account. So here’s where your diabetes care team comes in: Talk to your dietitian or diabetes educator to determine the right carb-counting number for you so you’ll be able to provide your body with a steady flow of energy throughout the day, maintain a healthy weight, and manage your blood sugar. The Basics of Counting Carbs Counting carbs is an effective way to monitor your carb intake and keep sugar from building up in the blood. You can use these basic tips to help manage your carb consumption: Foods that contain carbohydrates include starches, fruits, vegetables, dairy products, beans, and sweets. Most people with type 2 diabetes should stick to eating around 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. For foods that have nutrition labels, add up the grams of carbohydrates per serv Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To Carbohydrate Counting

A Beginner’s Guide To Carbohydrate Counting

Pia has a Bachelors Degree in Clinical Nutrition from Cornell University and a Masters of Science in Nutrition from New York University. She completed a dietetic internship at the Bronx Veterans Medical Center in order to become a registered dietitian. Prior to joining BD, Pia educated people with diabetes about medical nutrition therapy in a private physicians office, an outpatient clinic at a hospital and a nursing home where she counseled patients one-on-one and in group classes. This slide show explains: • What foods contain carbohydrates • How much of these foods you can eat • Where to look up the carb content of foods Next slide This is not true! Carbohydrates (carbs) have the greatest effect on your blood sugar. 90 to 100 percent of the carbs you eat appear in your bloodstream as blood glucose within minutes to hours after you have eaten. You may be asked to count the carbs that you eat. The carbs you will need to count are both: • starches that break down slowly into sugar • simple sugars that break down into blood glucose almost right away Many people believe that a diabetes meal plan means that you just have to cut back on sugar. Previous slide Next slide Products made from grains, such as pasta, bread, rolls, bagels, crackers, cereals and baked goods Starches include certain vegetables, all grains, and products made from grains All of these foods contain starches: Starchy Vegetables Regular and sweet potatoes, corn, fresh peas and lima beans Legumes Dried beans and peas Grains Grains like wheat, oats, barley, and rice Sugars include the natural sugars in fruit and milk, plus certain sweeteners added to prepared foods and drinks Fruit and fruit juices Foods that contain fruit or fruit juices such as jams, jellies, and fruit smooth Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate-counting Chart For People With Diabetes

Carbohydrate-counting Chart For People With Diabetes

Carbohydrate-Counting Chart for People with Diabetes Carbohydrates are your bodys main energy source. During digestion, sugar (simple carbohydrates) and starches (complex carbohydrates) break down into blood sugar (glucose). If you consume too much carbohydrate-rich food at one time, your blood sugar levels may rise too high, which can be problematic. Monitoring your carbohydrate intake is a key to blood sugar control, as outlined in a plan by your doctor or dietitian. Carbohydrates are found in lots of different foods. But the healthiest carbohydrate choices include whole grains , vegetables, fruits, legumes, beans, and low-fat dairy products. The chart below shows a single serving of carbohydrate-containing foods, which equals 15 grams: For more information about eating with Type 2 diabetes, click here . For more specific information or help, talk to your health care provider. The American Diabetes Association's National Call Center also offers live advice from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST, Monday through Friday at 1-800-DIABETES or 1-800-342-2383. This article has been reviewed and approved by Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator. Super article...now if only there were a simple diabetic exchange counter we could use easily here. I dont want to leave SparkPeople, but I also dont want to have to track in two separate places. I know, I know; its all just tracking. But I was just given a diabetic-type exchange chart and I cant stand the thought of having to flip back and forth between chart and logging in foods here. Why hasnt this been done already? (Not expecting an answer here, I know. I will be copying and mailing emailing this to the friendly folks at SparkPeople for feedback.) Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting

Carbohydrate Counting

Carbohydrate counting is a flexible way to plan your meals. It focuses on foods that contain carbohydrate as these raise your blood glucose (sugar) the most. Follow these steps to count carbohydrates and help manage your blood glucose levels. Your registered dietitian will guide you along the way. Step 1: Make healthy food choices Enjoy a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low fat milk products, and meat and alternatives at your meals. A variety of foods will help to keep you healthy. Use added fats in small amounts. This helps to control your weight and blood cholesterol. Choose portion sizes to help you to reach or maintain a healthy weight. Step 2: Focus on carbohydrate Your body breaks down carbohydrate into glucose. This raises your blood glucose (sugar) levels. Carbohydrate is found in many foods including grains and starches, fruits, some vegetables, legumes, milk and milk alternatives, sugary foods and many prepared foods. Meat and alternatives, most vegetables and fats contain little carbohydrate. Moderate servings will not have a big effect on blood glucose (sugar) levels. Step 3: Set carbohydrate goals Your dietitian will help you set a goal for grams of carbohydrate at each meal and snack. This may be the same from day to day or may be flexible, depending on your needs. Aim to meet your target within five grams per meal or snack. Step 4: Determine carbohydrate content Write down what you eat and drink throughout the day. Be sure to note the portion sizes. You may need to use measuring cups and food scales to be accurate. Record the grams of carbohydrate in these foods and drinks. For carbohydrate content of foods, check the nutrition label on food packages, food composition books, restaurant fact sheets and websites. Step 5: Monitor effect on blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Carbohydrate Counting

Diabetes And Carbohydrate Counting

If you have diabetes, general meal planning is important to help manage your blood glucose levels. Some people with diabetes also use “carbohydrate counting” or (“carb counting”). Read on to find out more and if this type of meal planning will work for you. What is carb counting? Carb counting is a way to find out how much carbohydrate is in your meals or snacks. Why is carb counting useful? Carb counting can help you get a consistent amount of carbohydrate at meals and snacks, which helps to manage your blood glucose levels. Your Registered Dietitian can tell you how much carbohydrate you need at each meal and snack. Can anyone use carb counting? Anyone with diabetes can use the carb counting method. If you use insulin, carb counting may be especially helpful. This is because you can match the amount of insulin you take with how much carbohydrate is in your meal or snack. The Canadian Diabetes Association suggests that for carb counting, a person must be able to: Do simple math Read nutrition information (for example, on food labels) Have access to measuring cups, spoons and scales Keep accurate and detailed food records How do I carb count? Here are 3 steps to help you get started with carb counting for packaged foods. Use the Nutrition Facts table to find the serving size of the food you are going to eat. Find the total amount of carbohydrate for the serving size. Remember to adjust the carbohydrate amount if your serving size is larger or smaller than the serving size listed on the package. Subtract the fibre from the total amount of carbohydrate. This will give you the amount of carbohydrate that will affect your blood glucose level (also called “available” carbohydrate). Fibre is a carbohydrate, but it does not affect your blood glucose levels. That is Continue reading >>

Counting Carbohydrates

Counting Carbohydrates

To best control your blood sugar: Do not skip meals. Counting calories might be something you’ve already done at one time or another in your life. Counting carbohydrates may be something new to you. So why is counting carbohydrates so important when you have diabetes? Counting carbohydrates: Keeps you in control of your blood sugar Keeps you in balance with with your medication or insulin dose Keeps you in control of food portions to manage your body weight How much carbohydrate do I need each day? Carbohydrates are measured in units called grams. Grams are a measure of weight. The total grams or amount of carbohydrate you need each day depends on your calorie goals, activity level and personal preferences. Carbohydrates generally provide 45-65% of your daily calories. For most people with type 1 diabetes, this ranges from 150-250 grams of carbohydrate a day. How you distribute this carbohydrate throughout the day can also make a difference in your blood sugar. To best control your blood sugar: Eat three meals a day, roughly 4-6 hours apart. Do not skip meals. Try to consistently eat the same amount of carbohydrate at each meal. Your registered dietitian can help you choose a carbohydrate goal and daily meal plan that keeps your food, medication and physical activity in mind. How much carbohydrate is found in the foods I eat? There are many resources you can use to count carbohydrates: The American Diabetes Association Exchange Lists for Meal Planning: Choose Your Foods lists grams of carbohydrate per exchange serving size. In this system, one carbohydrate exchange serving equals 15 grams of carbohydrate. Carbohydrate counting and food composition books are available. These resources can also be found online. Some cookbooks are available that provide nutrition informa Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting And Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting And Diabetes

Foods that contain carbohydrate are an important source of fuel for your body. Glucose is used by the body’s cell for energy. This makes the amount of carbohydrates you ingest an important consideration. Carbohydrate counting can help you manage your diabetes. Read more in our carbohydrate counting and diabetes factsheet. Continue reading >>

Carb Counting - What Is Carb Counting And How To Count Carbs

Carb Counting - What Is Carb Counting And How To Count Carbs

Tweet Carb counting is a way of better understanding how carbohydrates affect your blood sugar, medication requirement and insulin requirement. For people with type 1 diabetes and those with type 2 diabetes who require insulin, carbohydrate counting is a way of matching insulin requirements with the amount of carbohydrate that you eat or drink. For people with type 2 diabetes who don’t require insulin, carbohydrate counting is a way of regulating the amount of carbohydrate you consume and monitoring how this affects your blood glucose control, weight management and medication intake. Carbohydrate counting requires patience and diligence. Learning it successfully means understanding carbohydrates, learning how to adjust your insulin or medication accordingly, and measure yor blood glucose levels regularly for clarity. What are carbohydrates? Every carbohydrate we eat is converted into glucose and has an impact on blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates are commonly found within the following foods: Grains (breads, pasta, cereals) Fruits Vegetables Root crops (potatoes, sweet potatoes, and yams) Most alcoholic drinks (Beer, cider, lager, most cocktails) Desserts and sweets Most dairy products, except cheese, Sugars including sucrose, fructose, dextrose, maltose How should I count carbohydrates? Most people count carbohydrates using grams, with one serving equal to 15 grams of carbohydrate. Most foods are only partially carbohydrate (although some foods are entirely carbohydrate), but the effect of 15 grams carbohydrate will be the same whether it is from bread, biscuits or other foods. To ascertain the carbohydrate content of these foods, it is necessary to use food labels, reference books or computer programs, and a scale and list of carbohydrates. There are two methods of c Continue reading >>

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