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Potential New Diabetes Treatment Being Tested In Vancouver

Potential New Diabetes Treatment Being Tested In Vancouver

Potential new diabetes treatment being tested in Vancouver Jan 16, 2018 |For more information, contact Brian Kladko Note to news media:The researchers and a research participant will be available for interviews Tuesday, Jan. 16, from noon to 1 pm at the Diamond Health Care Centre, Vancouver General Hospital, 2775 Laurel St., Room 11177 (11th floor). The University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health are testing a possible diabetes cure that replaces a persons damaged pancreatic cells with new ones grown in the lab. The replacement cells are grown from embryonic stem cells. Researchers believe that if the new cells mature, multiply, and behave as hoped, recipients would be able to lessen or even eliminate their dependence on self-injected insulin. They might also be spared from having to continually monitor their blood sugar, usually by pricking their fingers several times a day. If these replacement cells restore a persons ability to produce their own insulin when needed, it would prevent dangerous episodes of low blood sugar and lessen the complications resulting from high blood sugar, such as blindness, heart attacks and kidney failure, said Dr. David Thompson, a principal investigator in the clinical trial, a UBC clinical assistant professor of endocrinology and medical director of the Vancouver General Hospital Diabetes Centre. Eventually, it might even free people from a lifetime of constantly checking their blood sugar and injecting themselves, transforming treatment of this disease into a more manageable condition. The trial could involve about 10 or more people in Vancouver with a severe form of type 1 diabetes, in which a persons immune system attacks the pancreas, degrading or eliminating its ability to produce insulin. A UBC-Vancouver Coastal He Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Screening For Adults

Type 2 Diabetes: Screening For Adults

Topic Overview Experts do not recommend routine testing for type 1 diabetes. Experts differ on when is the best time to start testing for type 2 diabetes. Talk with your doctor about what is putting you at risk for diabetes and whether you should be tested. The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC) recommends using a risk calculator such as the Canadian Diabetes Risk Questionnaire (CANRISK) to determine your level of risk. CANRISK is available at The CTFPHC recommends:2 Not testing if you have low to moderate risk. Testing every 3 to 5 years with an A1c test if you are at high risk. Yearly testing with an A1c test if you are at very high risk. The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) recommends testing every 3 years if you are age 40 or older. If you are at very high risk, the CDA recommends that you get tested more often and/or begin testing at a younger age. Some risk factors for type 2 diabetes include:1 You have a parent, brother, or sister who has type 2 diabetes. You are of Aboriginal, African, Hispanic, Asian, or South Asian descent. You are overweight (especially around your middle). You have vascular disease, such as heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, or peripheral arterial disease (PAD). For more information, see the topic Type 2 Diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Screening Tests Made Easier

Diabetes Screening Tests Made Easier

Canadian doctors have another option when testing people for Type 2 diabetes. Single measurement considers average blood glucoses levels over about 3 months Posted: Apr 08, 2013 9:24 PM ET | Last Updated: April 9, 2013 Canadian doctors have another option when screening people for Type 2 diabetes. On Monday, the Canadian Diabetes Association unveiled its 2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines to prevent and manage diabetes. It's estimated a third of Canadians will have either diabetes or prediabetes by 2020. People age 40 and older should check for diabetes, says Dr. Alice Cheng of the Canadian Diabetes Association. (CBC) The group hopes that a new standardized blood test, called the A1C, will encourage everyone over the age of 50 to get screened once every three years. The single measurement considersaverage blood glucoses levels over about three months. The A1C does not require people to stop eating for 12 hours before taking the test as was the case previously. The test can also diagnose prediabetes before full-blown diabetes occurs. "Pre-diabetes I like to think of as the waiting room to diabetes," said guideline chair and Toronto endocrinologist Dr. Alice Cheng. "We want to be able to identify who is sitting in that waiting and get them out of there as much as we can." Through lifestyle interventions such as diet changes, exercise, losing weight, quitting smoking and self management of blood glucose levels, the group aims to prevent people with prediabetes from worsening. In some cases, blood sugar- and cholesterol-lowering drugs will also be prescribed. Diabetes and Cardiovascular DiseaseABCDEs Heart disease is a major cause of death anddisability for people living with diabetes. The new guidelines encouragethem to know their heart health ABCDEs and work to educate he Continue reading >>

Coverage For Test Strips For Manitoba Diabetes Patients Reduced

Coverage For Test Strips For Manitoba Diabetes Patients Reduced

Coverage for test strips for Manitoba Diabetes patients reduced WINNIPEG Its not a boast worthy statistic but Manitoba has the highest number of people living with diabetes per capita in Canada. And Friday, the province announced it will reduce the number of testing strips it will pay for meaning more of a financial burden on a growing number of Manitobans. Bob Swaffer has been living with diabetes for 25 years. His son, twin brother and niece all have it too. I passed it down, my twin brother he passed it down to his daughter so it does get passed down, Swaffer said. Right now, 327,000 Manitobans have diabetes or could soon develop it, thats 25 per cent of the provinces population. Which means the most important part of their day is testing their blood glucose levels, anywhere from three to 11 times a day. RELATED: Rates of diabetes staggering in First Nations communities These little test strips cost a dollar a piece but now the province has reduced the amount itll cover by 350, from 4,000 strips a year per person to 3,650. What happens is, people are not going to be testing as frequently as they need to, said Andrea Kwasnicki, Regional Director for Diabetes Canada. The province defended its decision saying its only following the guidelines put out by Diabetes Canada, but Kwasnicki says the money saved should go towards public education Were hopeful the government will revisit and reconsider investing in education so people will know how to test with a purpose, Kwasnicki said. Swaffer worries if people dont test as often they could end up in hospital, costing the health care system more money. 2017Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc. Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes does not increase the risk of birth defects or the risk that the baby will be diabetic at birth. Also called gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), this type of diabetes affects between 3% and 20% of pregnant women. It presents with a rise in blood glucose (sugar) levels toward the end of the 2nd and 3rd trimester of pregnancy. In 90% if cases, it disappears after the birth, but the mother is at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. Cause It occurs when cells become resistant to the action of insulin, which is naturally caused during pregnancy by the hormones of the placenta. In some women, the pancreas is not able to secrete enough insulin to counterbalance the effect of these hormones, causing hyperglycemia, then diabetes. Symptoms Pregnant women generally have no apparent diabetes symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms occur: Unusual fatigue Excessive thirst Increase in the volume and frequency of urination Headaches Importance of screening These symptoms can go undetected because they are very common in pregnant women. Women at risk Several factors increase the risk of developing gestational diabetes: Being over 35 years of age Being overweight Family members with type 2 diabetes Having previously given birth to a baby weighing more than 4 kg (9 lb) Gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Belonging to a high-risk ethnic group (Aboriginal, Latin American, Asian or African) Having had abnormally high blood glucose (sugar) levels in the past, whether a diagnosis of glucose intolerance or prediabetes Regular use of a corticosteroid medication Suffering from ancanthosis nigricans, a discoloration of the skin, often darkened patches on the neck or under the arms Screening The Canadian Diabetes Association 2013 Clinical Practice Gui Continue reading >>

Tests For Diabetes Care

Tests For Diabetes Care

The following are important tests for basic diabetes care. Your doctor may recommend some tests more often than indicated. Target blood glucose (sugar) and blood pressure levels may differ, depending on your health. When What test? At diagnosis Type 2: ACR*/Kidney test: Urine test performed at the lab Eye examination: Through dilated pupils by an eye care specialist Nerve damage test: Using a 10-g monofilament or 128-Hz tuning fork Cholesterol and other blood fat tests: A blood test Approximately every 3 months Type 1 and 2: A1C blood test** (goal: 7.0 per cent or below for most people with diabetes) Blood pressure (goal: below 130/80 mm Hg) Review of home blood glucose (sugar) monitoring record Every year Type 1 and 2: ACR*/Kidney test: urine test performed at the lab (at least once a year and for type 1: Once a year if you have had diabetes for at least 5 years) Foot exam at every visit right away for an ingrown toenail or any cut or sore that doesn’t heal Meter check against the results of a blood test at the lab at least once a year Cholesterol and other blood fat tests Every 1 to 2 years Eye examination by an eye specialist Type 2: every 1–2 years (if no eye disease present)† Type 1: once a year† if you are over age 15 and have had diabetes for at least 5 years Regularly/periodically Type 1 and 2: Questions about erection problems Questions about depression and/or anxiety Questions about healthy eating and physical activity For young children and pregnant women, the timing and type of test may be different. * Albumin/creatinine ratio ** A1C targets for pregnant women, older adults and children 12 years of age and under are different. † More often if eye disease is present. ^ More often if treatment is initiated. Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Diabetes - Canada.ca

Diagnosing Diabetes - Canada.ca

A diabetes diagnosis is confirmed by means of a blood test that is administered by a physician or health care provider to measure blood sugar. Blood glucose levels vary with food intake, so the timing of this test in relation to meals is important. There are a number of tests that a healthcare provider may request for someone who he or she suspects may have diabetes: a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) is a test in which the blood sugar measurement is taken when the person has not eaten for at least eight hours; the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is one in which the person being tested fasts for at least eight hours, is then given a 75 g glucose load (in the form of a very sweet drink), and the blood sugars are measured at one- and/or two-hour intervals thereafter. If you are diagnosed with diabetes, your healthcare provider will talk to you about next steps, including a treatment plan and the role of the healthcare team. The earlier diabetes is diagnosed, the sooner an affected person can take steps to manage it well and prevent or delay any complications. If left untreated or isn't managed properly, diabetes can cause many other health complications. The information you provide through this survey is collected under the authority of the Department of Employment and Social Development Act (DESDA) for the purpose of measuring the performance of Canada.ca and continually improving the website. Your participation is voluntary. Please do not include sensitive personal information in the message box, such as your name, address, Social Insurance Number, personal finances, medical or work history or any other information by which you or anyone else can be identified by your comments or views. Any personal information collected will be administered in accordance with the Depar Continue reading >>

Criteria For Diagnosing Diabetes

Criteria For Diagnosing Diabetes

Topic Overview To be diagnosed with diabetes, you must meet one of the following criteria:2 Have symptoms of diabetes (increased thirst, increased urination, and unexplained weight loss) and a blood sugar level equal to or greater than 11.1 millimoles per litre (mmol/L). The blood sugar test is done at any time, without regard for when you last ate (random plasma glucose test or random blood sugar test). Have a fasting blood sugar level that is equal to or greater than 7.0 mmol/L. A fasting blood sugar test (fasting plasma glucose) is done after not eating or drinking anything but water for 8 hours. Have a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) result that is equal to or greater than 11.1 mmol/L. An OGTT is most commonly done to check for diabetes that occurs with pregnancy (gestational diabetes). Have a hemoglobin A1c that is 6.5% or higher. (This test is most reliable for adults. Some experts recommend using one of the other tests to diagnose diabetes in children.)1 Your doctor may repeat the test to confirm the diagnosis of diabetes. If the results of your fasting blood sugar test are between 6.1 to 6.9 mmol/L, your OGTT result is between 7.8 to 11.0 mmol/L (2 hours after the beginning of the test), or your hemoglobin A1c is 6.0% to 6.4%, you have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is above normal but not high enough to be diabetes. Discuss with your doctor how often you need to be tested.2 Continue reading >>

Why Take 2 Minutes?

Why Take 2 Minutes?

The Body Mass Index (BMI) is an indicator of body fat based on height and weight. Most adults with a high BMI have a high percentage of body fat and extra body fat is associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes. Indicate your height (in feet and inches) and weight in lbs. Being overweight or obese increases your risk of developing diabetes. The more overweight you are, the higher your risk. Your body mass index is According to the World Health Organization (WHO), BMI scores of: Below 18.5 = Underweight 18.5–24.9 = Normal 25.0–29.9 = Overweight/Pre-obese 30.0 and over = Obese To help you calculate this, use a tape measure; place it around your waist at the level of your belly button. Breathe out. Do not hold your breath, then measure. You can also enter the information by typing it in the box. Do you usually do some physical activity such as brisk walking for at least 30 minutes each day? (This activity can be done while at work or at home) * Increasing physical activity is a key element in controlling weight and reducing the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. Brisk walking is a great way to become more active, and every step counts. Aim for an average of 30 minutes per day, or 150 minutes per week. Consult your family doctor or health professional before increasing your physical activity level. By eating foods that are rich in fibre, reducing the amount of fat and salt in food selections and adding more fruits and vegetables, you can help control your diet and maintain or lose weight. Canada's Food Guide recommends 7 to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables each day, depending on your age and sex. Watch your total calories as well as the amount of fat, fibre and salt (sodium). Have you ever been found to have high blood sugar? * A previous test re Continue reading >>

Info Gestational Diabetes

Info Gestational Diabetes

What is Gestational Diabetes? In order to understand gestational diabetes, it is necessary to understand how insulin works. The hormone insulin which comes from the pancreas controls blood sugar. The role of insulin is to get the sugar into the cells. If for any reason the insulin is not working properly or there is not enough of it, the blood sugar will rise and if it rises high enough we call it diabetes. The difference between diabetes and gestational diabetes is that diabetes simply means your blood sugar is too high whereas gestational diabetes is any diabetes that arises or is first identified during pregnancy. During pregnancy the afterbirth or placenta releases hormones that circulate through your body. These hormones block how the insulin works and thus raise the blood sugar the purpose being to provide energy for the baby. Therefore, even in a normal pregnancy the pancreas has to make a lot of extra insulin just to keep the situation controlled. When the pancreas is not making enough insulin to overcome the blockage from these hormones, the blood sugar will rise, and this is called gestational diabetes. What causes it? The main problem is a mother’s pancreas not able to make enough insulin. There is a resistance to the insulin being made caused by the placental hormones but a normal pancreas can usually make enough insulin to overcome this insulin resistance. If the pancreas does not make the extra insulin, the sugar will rise and gestational diabetes occurs. What are the risk factors? The mothers weight can be a factor. If cells are swollen with fat owing to weight problems prior to pregnancy or if during the pregnancy excess weight is gained, it is more difficult for the insulin to get sugar into the cells. You are expected to gain weight in pregnancy, jus Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Testing Offers Little Value To Some Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Study

Blood Glucose Testing Offers Little Value To Some Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Study

When Margaret DeNobrega was first diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, she meticulously monitored her eating habits and blood sugar levels. The 68-year-old would write down what she ate for breakfast, lunch and dinner, pricking her finger to test her glucose levels before and after each meal. "I used to test before my meals, so I would know what my blood sugar was at, and then I would test two hours after," she says. "I did that for quite a while. "I guess maybe I did … obsess a little about it because I didn't want to go on medication." It's a daily ritual for many with Type 2 diabetes, aimed at helping them keep their blood sugar levels in check. But according to a new U.S. study, that common finger-prick test may have little impact on managing the chronic condition. Type 2 diabetes is one of the fastest-growing diseases in Canada, with about 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year. Complications associated with the disease — including kidney disease, heart disease, blindness and stroke — can range from serious to life-threatening, making proper management of blood sugar levels important. Insulin-dependent patients will frequently test their blood sugar before delivering a shot of the hormone. But the majority of Type 2 patients aren't treated with insulin, and can instead regulate their glucose levels through diet, exercise and sometimes medication. Rejecting routine testing In a paper published this week in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers found that self-monitoring of blood sugar for non-insulin Type 2 patients offers virtually no benefit. "From the study, what we find is that glucose monitoring should not be routine," Dr. Katrina Donahue, one of the study's authors, told CBC News. To conduct the study, the researchers tested 450 adult patients with Type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

Take The 2-minute Test For Type 2 Diabetes

Take The 2-minute Test For Type 2 Diabetes

Take the 2-minute test for Type 2 diabetes Are you at risk of having pre-diabetes or Type 2 diabetes? According to the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA), Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body cant properly processinsulin (called insulin insensitivity) or does not make enough insulin so that sugar builds up in the blood instead of being used as energy. About 90% of people with diabetes have Type 2. It is more typical in adults, but children can be affected too. The CDA has developed an online quiz for Canadians to see if they are at risk. Currently more than 9 million people in this country either have the disease or are in pre-diabetes. You can find out in just two minutes. Click here to take the test. Canada is a global leader in diabetes research. Almost 100 years ago, Frederick Banting and Charles Best discovered insulin and gave diabetics around the world the chance to live full lives. Now, Canadian stem cell researchers are working on ways to make those daily insulin injections a thing of the past via stem cell transplants. The Canadian Stem Cell Strategy & Action Plan will help make it happen. Click here to tell your federal candidates that you support the Action Plan and that they should, too. Continue reading >>

Postpartum Diabetes Testing Rates After Gestational Diabetes Mellitus In Canadian Women: A Population-based Study.

Postpartum Diabetes Testing Rates After Gestational Diabetes Mellitus In Canadian Women: A Population-based Study.

Postpartum Diabetes Testing Rates after Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Canadian Women: A Population-Based Study. Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: [email protected] Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Canadian Vigour Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Canadian Vigour Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Can J Diabetes. 2017 Dec;41(6):613-620. doi: 10.1016/j.jcjd.2016.12.013. Epub 2017 May 12. OBJECTIVES: We assessed the rate and type of postpartum glycemic testing in women with impaired glucose tolerance of pregnancy (IGTp) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We examined whether the likelihood of testing was modulated by patients' characteristics and pregnancy outcomes. METHODS: Our population-level cohort study included data from 132,905 pregnancies between October 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011, in Alberta, Canada. Laboratory data within 270 days before and 1 year after delivery were used to identify pregnancies involving IGTp/GDM and postpartum glycemic testing, respectively. Logistic regression was used to identify maternal and pregnancy factors associated with postpartum testing. RESULTS: A total of 8,703 pregnancie Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? It Depends On What Country You're In

Have Diabetes? It Depends On What Country You're In

Open this photo in gallery: "So, Dr. Q, do I have it or not?" asked Michael, a 47-year-old man who had just returned from Michigan. His wife, my patient, had brought him in to see me to clarify his diagnosis. He had undergone blood tests in Detroit and was told by his doctor there that he had diabetes. Upset and disbelieving, he refused to take medications. Once in Canada, he went to see his own family doctor. After doing blood tests here, his Canadian physician told him he was fine - and that he did not have diabetes. "Well, yes and no," I had to reply. It was an unusual situation based on different diabetes-testing criteria in the United States and Canada. The same patient with the same results can be told that he either has or does not have the condition. "Michael, both your doctors are right. In Michigan, you have diabetes. In Toronto, you don't." That didn't seem to help his peace of mind. Doctors are supposed to be without borders, and the diagnosis of common conditions should not change between countries that share so much. But American physicians are diagnosing diabetes even more aggressively than their Canadian counterparts. In January, 2010, the American Diabetes Association essentially made it easier for patients to be diagnosed with diabetes by adding the important Hemoglobin A1C test to the diagnostic list. Now, in the United States, a HbA1C level greater than 6.5 per cent means you have diabetes. Previously, the U.S. gold standard test for diabetes was an overnight fasting sugar (glucose) level of 7.0 millimoles per litre of blood or higher. That still holds for Canada. In fact, Canadian doctors are not even supposed to do the HbA1C test until a person has been fully diagnosed with diabetes by the usual fasting glucose tests. The HbA1C test is used only to Continue reading >>

Changes To Pharmacare Coverage - Blood Glucose Test Strips

Changes To Pharmacare Coverage - Blood Glucose Test Strips

Clinical studies continue to show that frequent blood-sugar testing for persons with Type II Diabetes is unnecessary and for those with Type I Diabetes (insulin-dependent), testing frequency should follow clinical guidelines. Effective June 15, 2017, the Manitoba government is making changes to Pharmacare and Employment and Income Assistance coverage for blood glucose test strips. The changes will more closely align with guidelines endorsed by Diabetes Canada. The new coverage levels include: 3650 test strips a year if a patient uses insulin; 400 test strips a year if a patient uses an oral diabetes agent with higher risk of hypoglycemia; 200 test strips a year if a patient uses oral diabetes agent with lower risk of hypoglycemia or manages diabetes with diet and exercise alone. Patients will also be able to access additional test strips if medically necessary. Frequently-Asked Questions Why is this change being made? Clinical studies continue to demonstrate that routine self-monitoring of blood glucose levels does not significantly improve the conditions of most patients with non-insulin treated, Type 2 diabetes. Additionally, Diabetes Canada, a national organization that supports people living with diabetes through research, advocacy, education and services has developed clinical guidelines recommending blood glucose testing frequency based on the medication prescribed. Manitoba is modifying coverage for blood glucose test strips to ensure benefits are aligned with best evidence and clinical guidelines so patient needs will continue to be met. Manitobans expect a system that improves their health and provides quality care while remaining cost-effective. The changes will also ensure coverage is medically appropriate and financially efficient. It is estimated the change Continue reading >>

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