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Diabetes Canada Data

Canadian Journal Of Diabetes

Canadian Journal Of Diabetes

Check the status of your submitted manuscript in EVISE Once production of your article has started, you can track the status of your article via Track Your Accepted Article. CiteScore: 1.74 CiteScore measures the average citations received per document published in this title. CiteScore values are based on citation counts in a given year (e.g. 2015) to documents published in three previous calendar years (e.g. 2012 14), divided by the number of documents in these three previous years (e.g. 2012 14). The Impact Factor measures the average number of citations received in a particular year by papers published in the journal during the two preceding years. 2016 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2017) 5-Year Impact Factor: 2.415 Five-Year Impact Factor: To calculate the five year Impact Factor, citations are counted in 2016 to the previous five years and divided by the source items published in the previous five years. 2016 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2017) Publishing your article with us has many benefits, such as having access to a personal dashboard: citation and usage data on your publications in one place. This free service is available to anyone who has published and whose publication is in Scopus. Canadian Journal of Diabetes is Canada's only diabetes-oriented, peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal for diabetes healthcare professionals. Published bimonthly, Canadian Journal of Diabetes contains original articles, resource reviews, a journal watch, shorter articles such as Perspectives in Practice... Canadian Journal of Diabetes is Canada's only diabetes-oriented, peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal for diabetes healthcare professionals. Published bimonthly, Canadian Journal of Diabetes contains original articles, resource revie Continue reading >>

Home - One Drop: Diabetes Management Made Simple

Home - One Drop: Diabetes Management Made Simple

One Drop: Diabetes Management Made Simple Get everything you need, all in one place. One Drop | Mobile empowers you to track and analyze all your diabetes data glucose, medications, food, and activity with just one app. Set goals, track progress, and see results! One Drop | Chrome is a Bluetooth blood glucose monitor that syncs with the One Drop | Mobile app. Get all the test strips you need with a One Drop | Premium or One Drop | Plus subscription. One Drop | Experts is a personal diabetes coaching program designed to help you reach all your health goals. Work with a CDE available 24/7 to get the support you need in real-time. Track all the essentials Blood Glucose, Food, Meds and Activity all in one place. Wirelessly transmit blood glucose data via Bluetooth to the One Drop Mobile app. Get all the test strips you need with a One Drop | Premium or One Drop | Plus subscription. Work one-on-one with your One Drop | Expert, a personal diabetes coach available 24/7 to guide you, support you, and celebrate your accomplishments. One Drop | Experts has been Recognized by the American Diabetes Association for Quality Self-Management Education* and Support. Beautiful visual interface and clear reports that the app can generate for my healthcare provider. Best of all is the news feed articles and community stream where you can see how other users are managing diabetes. Smallest drop of blood! No more entering numbers in my phone! I love it all! This is the app that gets it... Bluetooth blood glucose tracking works perfectly. Medication reminder and tracker in one. . . There is even someone who chats with you and checks up on you. Finally a meter and strips I can afford. Experts are great too.... overall I love it and am totally happy with it!!! Get One Drop | Mobile for free on Continue reading >>

Clarity - Canada | Dexcom

Clarity - Canada | Dexcom

All the Information You Need is on CLARITY's Dashboard Dexcom CLARITY Diabetes Management Software Managing diabetes can be complex. But with Dexcom CLARITY, diabetes data reporting and management are now made simple. You will have quick access to important insights that help in the assessment of your health: highs, lows, daytime, nighttime and best day. Additionally, you can find your estimated A1C, average glucose reading, risk for hypoglycemia and more. With CLARITYs compare feature, you can evaluate your glucose improvement over time. Identify problem areas with the comprehensive data tool and evaluate if your diabetes management solutions are working. Dexcom CLARITYs overlay report compiles each day of glucose trend data into a weekly overview. The Overlay report puts into context the frequency, duration and intensity of patterns of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. This gives you the ability to prioritize problems and find quick solutions. Dexcom CLARITY offers immediate insight to patterns and potential management solutions to discuss with your health care team. CLARITYs Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP) is a licensed, standardized glucose report created by the International Diabetes Center (IDC). AGP provides a big picture view of your diabetes management and is only one part of understanding your glucose patterns. BRIEF SAFETY STATEMENT The web-based Dexcom CLARITY software is intended for use by both home users and healthcare professionals to assist people with diabetes in the review, analysis, and evaluation of historical CGM data to support effective diabetes management. It is intended for use as an accessory to Dexcom CGM devices with data interface capabilities. Caution: The software does not provide any medical advice and should not be used for that purpose Continue reading >>

Diabetes Statistics In Canada

Diabetes Statistics In Canada

Estimated prediabetes prevalence in Canada (n/%) (age 20+) Diabetes complications are associated with premature death. It is estimated that one of ten deaths in Canadian adults was attributable to diabetes in 2008/09. [2] People with diabetes are over three times more likely to be hospitalized with cardiovascular disease, 12 times more likely to be hospitalized with end-stage renal disease and over 20 times more likely to be hospitalized for a non-traumatic lower limb amputation compared to the general population. [3] Thirty per cent of people with diabetes have clinically relevant depressive symptoms; individuals with depression have an approximately 60% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.3 Foot ulceration affects an estimated 15-25% of people with diabetes. One-third of amputations in 2011-2012 were performed on people reporting a diabetic foot wound. [4] Some populations are at higher risk of type 2 diabetes, such as those of South Asian, Asian, African, Hispanic or Aboriginal descent, those who are overweight, older or have low income. Diabetes rates are 3-5 times higher in First Nations, a situation compounded by barriers to care for Aboriginal people.3 Fifty-seven percent of Canadians with diabetes reported they cannot adhere to prescribed treatment due to the high out-of-pocket cost of needed medications, devices and supplies. The average cost for these supports is >3% of income or >$1,500. [5] As a result of stigma or fear of stigma, 37% of Canadians with type 2 diabetes surveyed by the Canadian Diabetes Association reported they do not feel comfortable disclosing their diabetes. [6] Highlights of diabetes-related policy and programs at the federal level Canadian Diabetes Strategy (CDS): Created in 1999 with initial funding of $115 million over five y Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Diabetes In Canada Over 10 Years: Applying Attributable Health Care Costs To A Diabetes Incidence Prediction Model

The Cost Of Diabetes In Canada Over 10 Years: Applying Attributable Health Care Costs To A Diabetes Incidence Prediction Model

Go to: Methods Diabetes risk and incidence To estimate the predicted risk and number of new diabetes cases within the next 10 years, we used the Diabetes Population Risk Tool version 2.0. DPoRT 2.0 is an updated iteration of DPoRT, a predictive algorithm developed to calculate future population risk and incidence of physician- diagnosed diabetes in those aged 20 years and over. DPoRT was derived using national survey data individually linked to a chart-validated diabetes registry. This cohort was then used to create sex-specific survival models using baseline risk factors from the survey for diabetes incidence. Specifically, we assessed the probability of physician-diagnosed diabetes from the interview date until censoring for death or end of follow-up. The model was developed in the Ontario cohort and predictions from the model were validated against actual observed diabetes incidence in two external cohorts in Ontario and Manitoba. Variables used within its two sex-specific models include a combination of hypertension, ethnicity, education, immigrant status, body mass index, smoking status, heart disease and income. Full details on the model specification and validation can be found elsewhere. 7 The regression model can run on nationally available population health surveys and has been updated (DPoRT 2.0) and used to established prevention targets for diabetes.8 For this study, we used DPoRT 2.0 to generate incidence predictions based on the recent 2011 and 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). The CCHS collects information on the demographics, health status and determinants of health of the Canadian population. It is a nationally representative survey that uses a crosssectional study design and is administered on an ongoing basis, with annual data reporting. Continue reading >>

Understand More About Your Diabetes With Carelink® Reports.

Understand More About Your Diabetes With Carelink® Reports.

See the same reports as your doctor - CareLink Personal software is a free web based program that collects information directly from your diabetes management system. It allows you to generate reports that can be used during your doctor’s visits and to monitor your own progress. Get on the same page with your doctor. This report is designed to help you view your glucose management while on your MiniMed® 670G system. You can use this report with your healthcare professional to improve the duration of time spent in Auto Mode and determine what events caused some of your Auto Mode exits. Continue reading >>

Revolutionary New Category Of Diabetes Self-monitoring Systems Recognized In 2018 Diabetes Canada Clinical Practice Guidelines

Revolutionary New Category Of Diabetes Self-monitoring Systems Recognized In 2018 Diabetes Canada Clinical Practice Guidelines

Revolutionary New Category of Diabetes Self-Monitoring Systems Recognized in 2018 Diabetes Canada Clinical Practice Guidelines Franais INNOVATIVE SYSTEM FROM ABBOTT EMPOWERS DIABETES PATIENTS AND REDUCES THE NEED FOR ROUTINE FINGER PRICKS1 MISSISSAUGA, ON, May 3, 2018 /CNW/ - An innovative new category in self-monitoring has been added to the 2018 Diabetes Canada Clinical Practice Guidelines for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. According to Diabetes Canada, self-management of diabetes remains the cornerstone of diabetes care,2 making the addition of the "flash glucose monitoring" class an important tool to help improve patient outcomes. This new class of monitoring technology automatically measures, captures and stores glucose level data continuously so that patients and their doctors can see patterns over time and make adjustments to lifestyle, diet or treatment, when needed. The guidelines are published every five years by the top diabetes researchers and clinicians in Canada and they provide healthcare providers with the most up-to-date information on caring for people with diabetes. Flash glucose monitoring has the unique ability to measure glucose every minute in interstitial fluid through a small filament that is inserted just under the skin and held in place with a small adhesive pad. Glucose levels are displayed on demand when the sensor is waved over, or "flashed", with a hand-held scanner. The FreeStyle Libre system, the first-ever flash glucose monitoring system, developed by Abbott, was authorized for sale by Health Canada in 2017 and is covered by most private health insurance companies. "Flash glucose monitoring is the next chapter in the management of diabetes," says Tina Kader, M.D., endocrinologist, at the Jewish General Hospital and LMC Glen in Continue reading >>

Newsroom | Abbott Secures Health Canada License For Freestyle Libre System For People With Diabetes

Newsroom | Abbott Secures Health Canada License For Freestyle Libre System For People With Diabetes

ABBOTT SECURES HEALTH CANADA LICENSE FOR FREESTYLE LIBRE SYSTEM FOR PEOPLE WITH DIABETES REVOLUTIONARY SYSTEM ELIMINATES THE NEED FOR ROUTINE FINGER STICKS1 AND FINGER STICK CALIBRATION PROVIDES REAL-TIME GLUCOSE LEVELS FOR UP TO 14 DAYS WILL BE REIMBURSED BY TWO MAJOR CANADIAN INSURERS; AVAILABLE IN THE COMING MONTHS ACROSS CANADA ABBOTT PARK, Ill.,June 29, 2017/ PRNewswire / -- Abbott (NYSE: ABT) today announced the Health Canada license of its FreeStyleLibre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, a revolutionary new glucose sensing technology for Canadian adults with diabetes. The first-of-its-kind system eliminates the need for routine finger sticks,1requires no finger stick calibration, and reads glucose levels through a sensor that can be worn on the back of the upper arm for up to 14 days. "The first word that came to mind when I learned about FreeStyle Libre was 'freedom'," saidMaria Miclea, who has been managing her Type 1 diabetes for eight years. "Freedom from the pain of routine testing and from social awkwardness. Also, peace of mind, knowing that I can quickly and easily scan my glucose levels whenever and wherever I want to help better manage my diabetes." With traditional glucose monitoring systems, people with diabetes often have to stick their finger a number of times throughout the day2,3to test their glucose levels. With Abbott's FreeStyle Libre system, people now have a convenient, less painful alternative to get a glucose reading. The disposable sensor is worn on the back of the upper arm. The system measures glucose every minute in interstitial fluid through a small filament that is inserted just under the skin and held in place with a small adhesive pad. The sensor can read glucose levels through clothing,4making testing more convenient and discreet. Continue reading >>

New Data Shows More Needs To Be Done To Keep Kids With Diabetes Safe At School

New Data Shows More Needs To Be Done To Keep Kids With Diabetes Safe At School

New data shows more needs to be done to keep kids with diabetes safe at school OTTAWA Nearly one-third of Ontario parents arent confident that school staff can keep their kids with type 1 diabetes safe, according to new data released today by the Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS), the Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids). Preliminary results from a survey of Ontario parents of school-aged children with type 1 diabetes show that: More than half of school-aged kids with type 1 diabetes do not have individual care plans; 21% of parents reduce their childs insulin at least once a week because they are concerned about hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) at school; and Nearly 13% of parents go to their childs school at least once a week to monitor their care. About 30,000 school-aged children in Canada (including about 7,000 in Ontario) have type 1 diabetes, a chronic disease where the pancreas no longer produces insulin. Children under five years old are the fastest group of newly diagnosed cases. With about 1 in 300 children currently affected, it is likely that every school will have at least one child with type 1 diabetes. The management of type 1 diabetes is a 24/7 task checking blood sugar, administering insulin, planning meals, and monitoring food intake and physical activity, said Dr. Sarah Lawrence, Chief of Endocrinology at CHEO. Considering that children spend about 30 to 35 hours per week in school, it is imperative that staff be educated, equipped and available to support children. To ensure that school staff are adequately trained, the CPS, along with Diabetes Canada and the Canadian Pediatric Endocrine Group (CPEG), have launched a series of new educational videos as part of the [email protected] initiative. Launc Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Canada - Data Blog - Chronic Disease Infobase | Public Health Agency Of Canada

Diabetes In Canada - Data Blog - Chronic Disease Infobase | Public Health Agency Of Canada

Youre reading our Data Blog, a new way of discovering public health data and getting the inside scoop on upcoming publications. Diabetes is a common chronic condition that affects Canadians of all ages. It occurs when the body loses its ability to produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that controls sugar levels in the blood. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. If left uncontrolled, diabetes results in high blood sugar levels, which can lead to serious complications. Fortunately, it is possible to remain healthy with diabetes, so long as it is well managed. What are the different types of diabetes? Type 1 diabetes occurs when cells responsible for the production of insulin, found in the pancreas, are destroyed by the body's immune system. This is why this type of diabetes is called an "autoimmune" disease. In order to function, a person whose pancreas isnt producing any insulin or very little must rely on daily medication the intake of insulin to regulate their blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes typically develops in children and youth, but can also occur in adults. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form. It happens when the pancreas doesnt produce enough insulin or the body cannot properly use the insulin the pancreas produces. The risk of developing this metabolic disorder is higher in certain ethnic populations and people who are physically inactive, overweight, or obese. Type 2 diabetes usually affects adults over the age of 40, but can be found in children and youth. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that occurs only in pregnant women, when high blood sugar levels develop during pregnancy. Although it is temporary and usually disappears weeks after delivery, women who have it are at greater risk of gettin Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Canada - Canada.ca

Diabetes In Canada - Canada.ca

Highlights from the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects Canadians of all ages. If left uncontrolled, diabetes results in consistently high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia), which can lead to serious complications such as cardiovascular disease, vision loss, kidney failure, nerve damage, and amputation. Fortunately, it is possible to remain healthy with diabetes through appropriate management and care. The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), in collaboration with all provinces and territories, conducts national surveillance of diabetes to support the planning and evaluation of related policies and programs. This fact sheet presents an overview of diagnosed diabetes data (type 1 or type 2 combined) from the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System (CCDSS, Box 1 ). Diabetes is a chronic condition that occurs when the body loses its ability to produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that controls sugar levels in the blood. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. Other types are uncommon. Footnote 1 Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, leaving the individual dependent on an external source of insulin for life. It typically develops in children and youth, but it can also occur in adults. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder. It occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin and/or when the body does not properly use the insulin produced. Individuals who are overweight or obese, physically inactive, or of certain ethnic origins, and those who have a family history of diabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. It typically appears in adults older than 40 years, but it can a Continue reading >>

Pen: Practice-based Evidence In Nutrition

Pen: Practice-based Evidence In Nutrition

Plant-based Diet for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes A review of the literature was conducted on the use of aplant-based diet in the management of type 2diabetes as recommended by the Canadian Diabetes Association (1). Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The authors defined aplant-based diet as: a regimen that encourages whole, plant-based foods and discourages meats, dairy products and eggs as well as all refined and processed foods. In observational studies the consumption of aplant-based diet was associated with decreased prevalence of type 2diabetes. The observational studies may be limited in accuracy since people on plant-based diets tend to be more physically active, have more education, and have lower BMIs, which could account for some or all of the differences in diabetes prevalence. In addition, intervention studies indicate that aplant-based diet is equal to, or more effective than, other diets in managing type 2diabetes. Plant-based diets were associated with improving body weight, cardiovascular risk factors and insulin sensitivity. Two of the five intervention studies recommended lower glycemic load foods only for their plant-based diet intervention groups, which may have contributed to the positive findings. It is not clear whether the benefits seen in the intervention studies were due to a lower consumption of meat and animal products and/or refined and processed foods or due to an increased consumption of vegetables. Recommendations are included in the paper for increasing client's acceptability and implementation of plant-based diets along with ways to enhance the capacity of health professionals to support the adoption of plant-based diets by individuals with type 2diabetes. Coincidentally, the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics r Continue reading >>

Diabetes, 2016

Diabetes, 2016

In 2016, 7.0% of Canadians aged 12 and older (roughly 2.1 million people) reported being diagnosed with diabetes. Note 1 Between 2015 and 2016, the proportion of Canadians who reported being diagnosed with diabetes remained stable. Note 2 Overall, males (7.6%) were more likely than females (6.4%) to report that they had diabetes. Diabetes increased with age Note 3 for both males and females up to age 64. The prevalence did not increase significantly for those aged 75 and older (Chart 1). This table displays the results of Data table for Chart 1. The information is grouped by Age group (years) (appearing as row headers), Percent and Confidence Interval, calculated using Lower 95% limit and Upper 95% limit units of measure (appearing as column headers). Note: Population aged 12 and over who report that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having diabetes. Source: Canadian Community Health Survey, 2016. Canadians aged 18 and older who were either overweight or obese were more likely than those who were classified as having a normal weight Note 4 to report that they had been diagnosed with diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes among obese Canadians was 13.2% in 2016, compared with 6.6% among overweight Canadians and 3.6% among those classified as having a normal weight. The prevalence of diabetes varied notably with household income. The percentage of Canadians aged 12 and older who had been diagnosed with diabetes was lowest amongst households that fell within the highest income quintile (4.9%). Note 5 Households among the lowest and second lowest income quintiles were most likely to report being diagnosed with diabetes (Chart 2). This table displays the results of Data table for Chart 2 Percent and Confidence Interval, calculated using Lower 95% limit and Continue reading >>

Launch Of The Diabetes Action Canada National Diabetes Repository

Launch Of The Diabetes Action Canada National Diabetes Repository

Launch of the Diabetes Action Canada National Diabetes Repository Launch of the Diabetes Action Canada National Diabetes Repository Diabetes Action Canada, part of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research SPOR Program in Chronic Disease, is thrilled to announce the launch of the National Diabetes Repository. The National Diabetes Repository will be a major step forward in the monitoring and treatment of diabetes in Canada by enabling discovery through research in a secure and controlled environment. The core elements of the repository will be created with Electronic Medical Record (EMR) data starting with existing primary care repositories in three provinces (Ontario UTOPIAN; Alberta NAPCReNandSAPCReN; Quebec RRSPUM). This represents data for over 50,000 patients with diabetes. Plans are underway to expand data holdings. Diabetes Action Canada has oversight of the use of the data through a Research Governing Committee. 50% of the Research Governing Committee members are patients; members also include physicians providing EMR data, researchers with expertise in observational and clinical research and subject matter experts in research ethics, privacy and law. The National Diabetes Repository will be available to Diabetes Action Canada Researchers. The aims of the research include improving appropriate screening for complications and facilitating effective and timely intervention to ultimately improve the lives and health of Canadian living with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Mortality Due To Diabetes

Mortality Due To Diabetes

Canada receives a C and ranks 15th out of 17 peer countries on mortality due to diabetes. Two million Canadians suffer from diabetes, a figure that is expected to increase to three million over the next decade. The prevalence of diabetes in Canada continues to increase. Putting mortality due to diabetes in context Diabetes is a global epidemic and, according to the International Diabetes Federation, one of the most challenging health problems in the 21st century. In 2011, diabetes accounted for about 4.6 million deaths worldwide. 1 Globally, it is estimated that more than 350 million people suffer from diabetes; this number is expected to jump to over 550 million by 2030, if nothing is done. 2 An estimated 280 million people worldwide have an impaired glucose tolerancea precursor to diabetes. This number is projected to reach 398 million by 2030, or 7 per cent of the adult population. 3 Diabetes has also shifted down a generationfrom a disease of the elderly to one that affects those of working age or younger. According to the International Diabetes Federation, as a result of decreasing levels of physical activity and increasing obesity rates, type 2 diabetes in children has the potential to become a global public health issue. 4 Your e-mail was not in the correct format. It should be in the form [email protected] Diabetes is a chronic, often debilitating, and sometimes fatal disease that occurs when there are problems with the production and use of insulin in the body, ultimately leading to high blood sugar levels. Long-term complications from diabetes include kidney disease, diminishing sight, loss of feeling in the limbs, and cardiovascular disease. Type 1 is sometimes called insulin dependent and is considered to be an autoimmune reaction that attacks the insulin-produc Continue reading >>

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